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guad42
02-08-2008, 01:57 PM
Folks,

While doing some family research on my Civil War ancestor, I discovered several pension and service records that listed his being wounded in the "Battle of Fair Oaks - June 25, 1862". Out of curiousity I attempted to research this battle, but only found brief descriptions in the History of the
19th Massachusetts, and a couple of other sources. The only "Battle of Fair Oaks" that I have been able to find any real detail on occurred weeks before in early June, 1862.

Does anyone know if there were two battles at Fair Oaks in June of 1862, and if so is there any good sources on the battle of June 25th?

Regards,

Sam Dolan

Dignann
02-08-2008, 02:21 PM
Sam,

Since you know your ancestor's regiment, check the Official Records, which are available on-line. There is a chance his regimental commander filed a report of the regiment's activities around that time period.

There was an engagment on June 25, 1862 that occured a mile or so east of the Seven Pines/Fair Oaks battlefield. It became known as the Battle of Oak Grove or King's Schoolhouse. It was the opening engagement of the Seven Days fights around Richmond.

You can find more about it in the ORs, or check one of the more recent battle narratives, such as Stephen Sears's To the Gates of Richmond.

Eric

guad42
02-09-2008, 05:29 PM
Eric,

Greatly appreciated!

Regards,

Sam Dolan

DougCooper
02-09-2008, 06:21 PM
The 19th Mass was heavily engaged at "Oak Grove" on June 25, 1862, losing 13 killed and mortally wounded, 38 wounded and 3 missing. Co G, being the color company, sustained 1/3 of the casualties. This was the regiment's first stand up fight, but was nothing compared to what would come at Glendale a few days later.

I recommend highly the "History of the Ninetheenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry" by Ernest L Waitt.

My favorite quote from Oak Grove is in this book and comes from a letter from 19th Mass Sgt Major Newcomb to his brother after the battle.

"It is not the marching or the firing that wears men, but the suspense of the slow advance and frequent halts, the increasing rattle of musketry, the devilish yells of the our merciless enemy; till finally, when at once the storm of bullets whirs over and on each side begin to fall, and orders come thick and fast, the sweat oozes from every pore. It is not fear, but uncertainty that so strains the nerves and makes men live days in every moment."

john duffer
02-10-2008, 10:16 AM
Volume Two of Douglas Southall Freemanís LEEíS LIEUTENANTS has a very interesting account of Fair Oaks / Seven Pines from the southern perspective. Itís typical of the elaborate but undoable battle plans of early war, where column one triggers column two to march and trigger column three, etc. Freeman uses a split page format showing where each Confederate column actually is versus where Headquarters thinks they are. This was also the battle that saved Richmond by taking out Johnston.

guad42
02-11-2008, 02:34 PM
Doug,

Just today I found a copy of this book online through Tufts University and read the chapter on Oak Grove. I must tell you that I was amazed to see my ggg Grandfather's name among the wounded specifically mentioned by the author. I greatly appreciate the suggestion of this title, now I just have to find an actual edition somewhere.

Regards,

Sam Dolan


The 19th Mass was heavily engaged at "Oak Grove" on June 25, 1862, losing 13 killed and mortally wounded, 38 wounded and 3 missing. Co G, being the color company, sustained 1/3 of the casualties. This was the regiment's first stand up fight, but was nothing compared to what would come at Glendale a few days later.

I recommend highly the "History of the Ninetheenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry" by Ernest L Waitt.

My favorite quote from Oak Grove is in this book and comes from a letter from 19th Mass Sgt Major Newcomb to his brother after the battle.

"It is not the marching or the firing that wears men, but the suspense of the slow advance and frequent halts, the increasing rattle of musketry, the devilish yells of the our merciless enemy; till finally, when at once the storm of bullets whirs over and on each side begin to fall, and orders come thick and fast, the sweat oozes from every pore. It is not fear, but uncertainty that so strains the nerves and makes men live days in every moment."

Dignann
02-11-2008, 04:58 PM
Sam,

Wardhouse Books (http://www.wardhousebooks.com/MA9-19infantry.html), a division of Higginson Books Company, has reprinted Wait's history of the 19th Massachusetts.

Eric