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BrianHicks
03-14-2010, 06:48 PM
Find below, the Orders which were given to the Commanders throughout the event. Also attached are two PDFs which are of the maps the Officers were given.

sthabig
03-14-2010, 11:43 PM
No complaints, excellent event...had a great time.

Johnny Lloyd
03-15-2010, 09:34 AM
As I tiptoed into work today, my heels aching from blisters, I thought of how much fun I had being so miserable. ;)

The pain is temporary, but the pride lasts forever...

Highlights for me:

1) The attack on the Federal fortifications. Great fun and exhilirating feeling of 'we're going in'... well, almost. :rolleyes:
2) Meeting new friends and seeing old ones.
3) Lots of time to think on a long road march- reminded me of the total boredom of war between its 'mad minutes' of action that we read about in period accounts. It is still so true in today's warfare.

Lowlight:

1) Evicting Beelzebub or Azazel (or other lesser incubus, I think) which resided in my bowels on the road march back to start point on Sunday. I think it was some bad bacon that I ate or or full demonic posession (whichever comes first). This is what I get for touching the flesh of the unclean animal.:rolleyes:

Thanks, Brian, for a superior event! I haven't done that in awhile.

Good times and all the best! -Johnny Lloyd :wink_smil

cwpilgrim
03-15-2010, 10:14 AM
2 grueling days of being: Cold, Wet, Tired and hungry.

Absolutely loved it.

Proud Survivor of the LBL 2010 Mud March

BrisbaneReb
03-15-2010, 11:31 AM
I'll post more on the actual event later but I need to get this out first:

Missing: A big white Australia Post cardboard box with PAUL NORRIS and two address written on it: an Australian and a US address. I left it for Nic Clark near his gear at the photography studio after the event (in the parking lot) but he didn't recognize it. If someone has picked it up, please talk to Nic Clark.

Thanks.

DougCooper
03-15-2010, 12:19 PM
Well done boys. Its cool to see continual advances at events like this in command and control - simulating higher authority that effectively compensates for the lack of numbers at our better, smaller events. Way to push the ball forward again!

BrianHicks
03-15-2010, 12:32 PM
I'll post more on the actual event later but I need to get this out first:

Missing: A big white Australia Post cardboard box with PAUL NORRIS and two address written on it: an Australian and a US address. I left it for Nic Clark near his gear at the photography studio after the event (in the parking lot) but he didn't recognize it. If someone has picked it up, please talk to Nic Clark.

Thanks.

The box, remaining unclaimed as the parking lot was empty, was handed to me.

It is secure at my residence. Please advie via e-mail to: brian_hicks@usa.net as to how you wish me to dispose of it.

thad gallagher
03-15-2010, 01:04 PM
Well, cold, wet, tired, and sore, I enjoyed it.

Had a great time 'building up' the fortifications with my squad. Amazing what a little motivation and initiative can accomplish, even though at the completion of said works we were evicted and the the works turned over to another company (again living what we read in their accounts). There was satisfaction in knowing they may have saved the bacon of our forces though, as we watched the assault get repulsed.

Long live the 'Flying Eagle'!

As always, it is always great to see old friends and make new ones.

Jeremy Bevard
03-15-2010, 01:25 PM
Does it mean it was a good and tiring event when after noon on Monday there are only a few AAR's?

Thanks to the men in Company C. I enjoyed being your LT for the weekend and it being my first time being a company officer besides Bummers, which was different. I hope I served you well. 2nd platoon did a fine job in any of the commands I gave considering we never drill together before hand.

Thanks to Company B for the works on Saturday! I sent my platoon in there at a run to meet the enemy and was very happy they were there. When the rest of the company came on line I felt even better seeing what was coming. We could never have held our ground without those works! After the fight was over I told someone, don't remember who now, thank God and say a prayer for Company B for building this redoubt. Lots of little memories that I will not go in to detail on but will always remember.

To the men who built and slept in Fort Drizzle and survived the Owen's Mud March (sorry Skip  ), welcome home.

Old Reb
03-15-2010, 01:43 PM
Good events are few and far between. Backwaters had a unique vision and the foundations to implementing that vision were excellent. My hat is off to Brian Hicks and Josh Fieldhouse and all those that worked behind the scenes to move water and logistics. It takes a lot of work to pull off an event. It takes vision to come up with the idea for a good event. Both criteria were obviously present in the planning and implementation of Backwaters. Congratulations to the Backwaters team and a pat on the back to all that actually showed up to experience the event. It takes both!

Will Eichler
03-15-2010, 01:47 PM
Gentlemen of Company C,

Well done! Thank you very much for dedication to come out and portray the men of the 63rd IN. You did an excellent job in all your work. Jeremy and NCOs, you made sure that the leadership we received from above was passed down and orders were carried out efficiently and quickly. Well done.

To our Brothers in Company B,

Thanks for sharing the weekend with us! It was an excellent experience marching next to you. I hope our picket posts to the left of your excellent redoubt gave you comfort that your flank was secure, both when you built it and we all came a 'runnin during the thwarted CS attack.

Skip and Eric,

Thanks for your leadership. It takes a lot more that re-enactors realize to lead these things. It takes even more when you have no idea what will be thrown at us and have to respond on a moment's notice (even if all of us officers were sleeping quite nicely Friday).

Hank,

Thanks for brining your specific story to our experience. It was a new one for me and I'm still processing what I took away from it.

Brian, Art, Josh and the rest behind the scenes,

Thanks for doing this. It's given many of us a much better idea of what the men we portray went through - and plenty of sore feet, strained calves, stories and good laughs.

To Fort Drizzle - GOODBYE!

Best to all,

Will

PlainOlSmitty
03-15-2010, 02:53 PM
Here is Company H after coming out on Sunday.http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs452.ash1/24871_1314404872023_1587721544_741751_6975030_n.jp g

Sam Harrelson

Phil McBride
03-15-2010, 02:53 PM
I'm sore in every joint and the pads of my feet are especially testy this morning. But what a fine weekend. The term boot-sucking mud has a whole new relevance and the concept of straggling is now more than theoritical. The weekend offered a lot of memorable moments stemming from the marches, the combat, and the camping. Like Tom Yearby, I was impressed with the obvious preparation and organization of the whole event.

The appearance of the especially ragged young Rebs in one of the companies was quite an image. Those fellows went to the edge with their impressions and I compliment them. Posing for a still photo is one thing, but marching 16 miles and camping in those rags for two days is quite another. I hope the one who appeared to wear no socks in his shoes, does not have bloody feet today.

I'm also working on an article for the Camp Chase Gazette about the event, and if there is a Federal participant who would be interested in sharing some behind the Yankee lines experiences, it would sure help me write a balanced article.

Phil McBride
Co A
54 Georgia

robert-m
03-15-2010, 03:05 PM
I had a very good time. Met some people that I have only conversed with via e-mail, or on the phone. and look forward to seeing and fighting with them again.
Got back from the doctor a little while ago. I did high-per extend my left knee. He said it will be good to go in a few weeks and to take it kind of easy. This happening only added to my experience. the muddy march in to the backwoods and then not knowing what was happening until we deployed and went up a ridge at a run and getting to the top to just see a wooded breast works and getting fire coming down on you. It makes me admire those men even more. Then sleeping in the cold, wet woods and not having the comfort of my sweetheart to keep me warm, I only wanted to go home at this time. Re-living a lot of things that they went through. We only commuted through roughly 36 hours of their life, and those men did it for years. Then on Sunday forming up in the drizzling rain and blackened cold March morning, and getting hit and fighting most of the way back in the even muddier road/path ways that we came from the day before was kind of demoralizing. But again Re-living the true life of the men that came before us. I look forward to getting back in the field and doing more events like this one.
Thanks Brian and crew for a awesomely great event.
God's speed, Robert

Michael Comer
03-15-2010, 03:26 PM
So a friend sends me a message and asks how Backwater was. I told him it was miserable but educational. The mud made every step twice as difficult. Each hill seemed like two because of the effort involved to raise your feet out of the muck and not lose your shoes. The rain made everything wet but there were good moments looking back. I didn't see them at the time because I was so miserable. But there were good stalwart men in the company and I appreciate them being there. I drew strength from all of you.

It was probably the toughest event I have done and I've done quite a few tough events: Rich Mt., both Piney Wood and Banks Grand Retreat, 2 previous LBL events etc. I woke up Sunday feeling dizzy sick and nauseous, thought I was going to pass out a couple of times and didn't know if I would make it out on my own but used a little mind over matter and told myself I was walking out of there with my men.

Well, I walked out with some of my men. Several of us straggled badly as we got tired out. I've never straggled at any of those other events but this time my heels were in shreds and bleeding, my legs were about worn out and my shoulders were absolutely killing me but I finished it on my own steam and that gives me a sense of accomplishment. Was I ready for the event? Yes, I was and I made it out before others that are younger than me. But sometimes things happen that defeats your planning and I do apologize to Co. A for not making it out with the rest of the column. I wanted to but it just got harder and harder to walk at the pace I needed to be going to keep up. I can't wear a pair of shoes today so I'm at home trying to get my feet back into shape.

biggumbo
03-15-2010, 03:28 PM
Not having participated in previous events like Grand Retreat or Piney Woods, this was my first experience with a march-intensive event, and it was without a doubt the most arduous experience I have encountered in this hobby, and one that probably brought me closer to what that true experience and appreciation of what the real men endured on a daily basis. Cold, wet, mud, and marching, and exhaustion. Even the sense of demoralization, marching back over the route you came in, through terrible conditions, defeated, with the enemy right on your heals, thinking all the while "it's the end of the war, what the hell are we still doing this for?". The march through the mud pushed me up to and past what I thought my threshold of endurance could take, especially on that long trek out on Sunday, and I cannot thank my comrades in Company A of the 54th Georgia enough, because it was their encouragement (and chiding and abuse), that helped to get me through it. Throughout the entire weekend I was fortunate to be with men who willingly shared what they had, joked, complained, and always looked out for each other, and I thank all of you for your generosity and good-will.
Even though our 36-hour event seems trivial to 4 years of unabated hell 150 years ago, I hope I now have a far greater appreciation of the trials the men we portray went through. I know I take away a sense of pride of making it through, because Mr. Hicks put it at the end, that's what we can all take away.
My thanks to everyone who put in their time and effort to bring this event together and to all of those who participated. May your blisters heal fast.

c.irelan
03-15-2010, 03:33 PM
Great event a test of mental and physical strength, Loved every moment of it........

Missing 1. Black pre-tied Cravat.
Thought I rolled it up in my blanket in the early morning hours... but to no avail to be found.
If anyone has picked it up please let me know or it could still be in the federal fort down by the bottom end ?

GWagner
03-15-2010, 04:40 PM
Here is Company H after coming out on Sunday.http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs452.ash1/24871_1314404872023_1587721544_741751_6975030_n.jp g

Sam Harrelson

That is a great pic Sam!

Iceman
03-15-2010, 04:40 PM
Mr. McBride,

Thank you for taking notice of the amount of effort those of us in Co. H, 57th GA made to not only look right, but to do it right, too. The condition of my feet today is nothing that a little Betadine 3 times a day won't fix. ;-)

rdykes
03-15-2010, 05:38 PM
I had a great time and Mr. Hicks was not joking when he said that this event would challenge us it did. I led Company D of the 57th GA for the weekend. Due to family reasons and real life we only had half of those registered show up and I ended up being promoted the day before the event as our original CO could not make it so I did the best that I could and went with it. My feet like Mr. Comers above were bloody and swollen so I too stayed home from work today not able to wear shoes. That being said, would I do it again yes (I have that disease that makes me want to put myself in miserable situations over and over again like most of us) Did I and my company have a good time yes we did. I have never straggled before at an event but after 4 miles on the way back on Sunday the skin on my heels was gone so I couldn't keep up and thus experienced what it was like to straggle and keep looking over your shoulder to make sure the Feds weren't going to capture me, and I made it out on my own which makes me feel better about falling out and leaving what was left of my company. Picket duty on Saturday night was quite an experience as well because it was so dark and cloudy we had a hard time seeing each other let alone keeping an eye out for the enemy. I really enjoyed the terrain and the camaraderie of this whole event and besides a few tired complaints I don't know anyone who didn't have a good time. I would Also like to compliment the boys of Co. H 57th GA pictured above yall by far in my opinion were the best looking group of late were rebs I have ever seen and hope to see yall at events in the future. Overall this event is one I won't forget and Thanks to all who put it together.

DougCooper
03-15-2010, 06:29 PM
Somebody needs to enter that 57th GA photo in next month's photo contest. Take that photo and compare it to the various real deal CS prisoner photos, east and west. Its right in every detail...including girth of the subjects. Wow - well done.

Tom Craig
03-15-2010, 06:38 PM
Somebody needs to enter that 57th GA photo in next month's photo contest. Take that photo and compare it to the various real deal CS prisoner photos, east and west. Its right in every detail...including girth of the subjects. Wow - well done.

What Doug said!! That is one of the best, if not THE best CS group image I have ever seen...there really should be no contest for next month's cover photo.

Tom Craig

Lewis Robinson
03-15-2010, 07:08 PM
Missing: A groundcloth that is green plaid on one side and black on the other was lost at some point during the foray on the federal works.

PM or email at robinslmusgrove@gmail.com if you find it.

Thanks

WestTN_reb
03-15-2010, 07:47 PM
Overall, the event was very realistic. It was cold, wet, long marches, commands and commanders many felt were stupid, in short we were miserable. Our company's consensus was that the fires of hell would've been a welcome relief to the cold, rain, and pitch dark nights. It gave one a new appreciation for what the original cast went through.

Unfortunately, I could not make the march Sunday, as my right knee was roughly the size and shape of a grapefruit. It did allow me to have some interesting first person with the Feds when they came through.

mootpoint
03-15-2010, 08:37 PM
Incredible experience! Top notch leadership, fantastic pards on the line, and ferocious enemies. I could truly feel the desperation of our southern brethren as they attacked the barricades. Maybe looking for food, but mostly just worn out but still mad as hell. The mud on the march was an added bonus. I kept asking myself how long it would take for the pain to just numb my senses and how many weeks of marching it would take to truly toughen up my feet. This event was the first that gave me a true sense of what our brothers went through 145 years ago. I look forward to the next one.

BrianHicks
03-15-2010, 08:41 PM
Rations.

Issued to cover 30 hours of event time (Saturday Morning to Sunday at noon)

This is what we planned on, and issued in the sufficient quantities to satisfy the number based on registration.

Federals

6 Officers
69 Enlisted

Confederates:
14 Officers
113 Enlisted

Independent Scouts/Partisans
18 Enlisted

For the Confederates Enlisted:
8-ounce Portion of Slab Bacon per man
5.5 ounces of Cornmeal per man
2 ounces of unbleached flour per man (the cornmeal and flour was premixed)
4 ounces of parched corn per man
7 ounces of peanuts per man
4 ounces of Chicory per man

For the Confederate Officers
14 ounces of Smoked Pork Loin per man
5 ounces of Cheese per man
5 ounces of Coffee beans per man
3 ounces of unrefined raw sugar per man
1 and half - 3 ounce loaves of soft bread per man

For the Federal Enlisted men
8-ounce Portion of Slab Bacon per man
5 ounces of Cheese per man
5 ounces of Coffee beans per man
1 ounce of unrefined raw sugar per man
1 and half - 3 ounce loaves of soft bread per man

For the Federal Officers
14 ounces of Smoked Pork Loin per man
5 ounces of Cheese per man
5 ounces of Coffee beans per man
3 ounces of unrefined raw sugar per man
2 x 3 ounce loaves of soft bread per man

For the Independent Scouts/Partians
10 lbs of Hungarian Chebais (Sausages) -closest thing I've ever found to what I understand as period preserved sausages
2 lbs of Cheese
3 lbs of sweet potatoes
3 lbs or red potatoes
2 onions
1x clove of garlic
2x loaves of 3 oz fresh bread per man
4 lbs of Salt Pork
10 ounces of Coffee
3 ounces of unrefined raw sugar

Old Reb
03-15-2010, 08:53 PM
Had the Yadkin Independent Scouts been in the area, they would certainly have appreciated the bountiful rations. Also, they would have appreciated the abundant supply of firewood gathered by the rebs before the rebs changed positions. At least the ones that would have been lounging around boiling coffee safetly behind the reb lines. I could not have spoken for the ones behind the yanks lines had they been present. But, as I stated else where, we were on a benevolent mission to East Tennessee and no where near the Backwater area.

Bushrod Carter
03-15-2010, 09:05 PM
Here is Company H after coming out on Sunday.http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs452.ash1/24871_1314404872023_1587721544_741751_6975030_n.jp g

Sam Harrelson

THAT is a GREAT image! Thanks for sharing!

KPavia
03-15-2010, 09:28 PM
From the three of us who made the drive out from Utah...

We all agreed that the 26 hours spent there and the 26 hours spent back was well worth it and we loved it! For two of us, this was our first campaigner event and we chose wisely.

Thanks to Mr. Hicks and all those behind the scenes and to our chain of command in Co. C for an excellent event.

Pvt_M
03-15-2010, 10:04 PM
I second what Kenny said, I'm just now unloading my gear and cleaning myself up. It was one long drive, but so worth it! Thanks to everyone in company C, it was a good time. Special thanks to Will Eichler, Skip Owens, and a sergeant (don't remember which, I was kind of tired) for keeping me in the fight on Saturday night with that blessed lemon powder! Great leadership, from the corporals up to the battalion commander. Thanks again for everyone that contributed.

Scott Gutzke
03-15-2010, 11:14 PM
This was without a doubt the toughest event I've ever done, and I've done a few tough events. This event was the opposite extreme from Vicksburg: Life on the Line in 2007 with 109 degree temperatures and 100% humidity that had previously been my toughest event.

I was cold and wet through most of the event and only slept a few hours. The mud was horrendous and made every step twice as hard. My feet are tore up, but I still made it in to work on Monday. My students were all asking me why I was hobbling around the classroom. When I explained it to them, they just couldn't understand why I would put myself through that!

For me, this was the most realistic event I've ever done. It felt more like being back in the regular Army again than I have ever felt before. I was legitimately scared when the Johnny wave came rolling toward us during the second attack on Saturday. I quickly realized that I didn't have my haversack and blanket roll and didn't want to be captured without them. Fortunately our musketry stopped the onslaught before they could gobble me up.

The Federal companies worked very well together. We had excellent leadership and comradeship. The negative things that happened were the same type of things that happened to me when I was in the regular Army--and most couldn't be avoided. The men complained (as all soldiers do and with good reason) but we adapted and overcame. And my file partner had a Spencer repeater that made me feel real safe. Yes Jim, I only liked you for your repeater! :D

I would like to say a big thank you to all those who worked so hard to put on Backwaters 1865. The amount of effort, planning, and care that you all put into the event was obvious and made it more enjoyable for all who participated. Even though I was miserable and in pain I would do this event again in a heartbeat.

Scott Gutzke
Lately, Corporal, 2nd Squad, 1st Platoon, Company B, 63rd Indiana

Mark Susnis
03-15-2010, 11:25 PM
I definitely needed this past weekend. The 21st Century Army has consumed me and this was an opportunity to see my friends and get away from the Blackberry / cell phone and daily grind.
On Friday a.m. I called the Co. B 63rd Indiana Orderly SGT Joe Liechty up in Ohio and let him know we were in a torrential downpour at Fort Campbell which is only 25 minutes from the event site. I told Joe to prepare accordingly. The rain let up on Friday p.m. and John "Tiny" Grimes called to let me know he was already on site. I went home and packed my gear consisting of only my overcoat and gum blanket and drove 25 minutes to the event site. Tiny and I linked up at McDonalds and saw a few obese Confederates downing some Big Macs. We both remarked that "they aren't going to make it". More on that thought later. Tiny was one of the planners of the Bentonville Preservation March in 2000. Where did those 10 years go? The last time I attended an event at LBL was five years ago at the "Wood Gathering Detail". Suffice it to say I walked away from that one disappointed and "Backwaters" was definitely a 360 degree improvement. Hats off to Gunny Hicks, Josh Fieldhouse, Bill Little, and Art Milbert for pulling off a winner!

Sustain:
- Ration Issue for the Federals. Ration issue was conducted in a period correct manner in darkness with only a few campfires to light the way

- Gut check march at the end. I know I had no sleep over the course of the weekend and with little rations coupled with mud covered rolling hills I was definitely
operating on sheer guts those last few miles. This is what the Soldiers on '61-'65 did almost day in and day out. This small taste of misery gave me an even greater
appreciation for the Soldiers that we portray. Those little voices in your head will definitely screw with your mind but you learn to overcome and Soldier on.

- Incorporation of repeating rifles. This was the first time that I have fired a repeater at an event. Orderly SGT Liechty let me use his Henry during one of the engagements.
After 10+ years of only handling a muzzleloading rifle at events I can truly appreciate the efficency and fire power of a repeating rifle. Easy to see why members of the 63rd
Indiana would have bought repeating rifles.

- Younger generation of living historians. The group of young ragged CS soldiers looked awesome and the great lengths they went through on their impression were appreciated by all.
On the Federal side one of the companies had a large majority of young 18-20 something Soldiers with good impressions to boot! I have known Sam Harrelson over 10 yrs back when he was the drummer boy in "Wicked Spring". Great to see Sam this weekend on the CS side and friends carrying the torch with awesome impressions as seen in the image he posted.

- Home Guard impressions. The shotgun toting Home Guards on the CS side definitely looked the part!

- Eric Fair's "thousand yard stare" said it all!

- Use of the LBL site. Challenging terrain with minimal modern intrusions and lots of maneuver area to operate. Land Between the Lakes National Forest is definitely a great place to host an event of this nature.

- There's something to be said for paying a little more for quality gear. The MJN Federal bootees I bought in 2000 are still hanging tough. One of my pards had on a pair of Robert Land Federal bootees only two years old that were ready to fall off his feet. Evan ended up taking off his shoes and going barefoot a few miles on Sunday's march.

Improve

- As men who who portray Soldiers we all have room where we can improve our levels of physical fitness. Lots of young Soldiers that we passed on Sunday's march should have hung in there with their pards. When Skip Owens posted on this forum that participants needed to get in shape for the event he meant it. The guys bordering on obesity eating at McDonalds before the event need to put down the Big Macs and get out and exercise. This gut check march should have been a wake up call for everyone!

- Saw too many knapsacks on the Federal side. I know Capt Reinholz's pre-event communication called for no knapsacks and to go with either a blanket or greatcoat. If we are going to follow impression guidelines then lets follow the guidelines.

- I must admit I was a little confused about portraying a March 1865 scenario in the woods of Tennessee situated between the site of Fort Donelson and Fort Henry.
Hopefully someone will put together a February 1862 scenario at LBL with a march from the Fort Henry trail in LBL to Fort Donelson NBP with strict impression guidelines that call for State jackets and smoothbore muskets only.

- Safety and muzzle awareness. NCOs and Officers have to keep an eye on safety and muzzle awareness during engagements. Blank rounds have the capability to seriously maim and injure someone.

I was definitely walking a little funny after the rough 25 minute drive home on Sunday. There's nothing a litttle Tylenol PM won't cure. Funny how a shoulder aches after carrying a rifle all weekend but it was a good soreness confirming that I want to continue in the hobby. I've had my doubts recently especially after attending a day LH at Stones River in January where I saw some of the worst impressions of Soldiers. I walked away from that one ready to give it up. This event reminded me why I will continue in this hobby and one of the reasons is the friendships I have made over the course of 10+ yrs. I swear that the lack of sleep while trudging along on Sunday kept messing with my head and I felt like I had been constantly on the march day after day especially since I attend events with same guys the past few years.

Best regards,
Mark Susnis
Co B 63rd Indy and proud to be part of the "Advanced Guard" for the Federals

Michigan Yankee
03-16-2010, 12:33 AM
The weekend started out with the federals being delivered to our camp area. Then later that same night a prisoner by the name of James Pieble who is a private in the 12th New York Infantry was delivered to the camp of the 63rd Indiana and he was being charged with 1 count of rape and 2 counts of attempted rape. He was placed under guard, until we could deliver him to the Third Division Provost Marshall. We formed up to receive our food rations then we hunkered down for the night. We didn’t put out any pickets out the first night because there was no action expected.

We were awaken by the silent reveille so that the bugle didn’t give away our position. We tended our fires and cooked our meat ration. Around 5:30am in the morning we formed up in full gear and inspected our rifles and were then ordered to load. We right faced without doubling and started our march. We marched until around dinner time and sent out pickets because there was a reb spotted a ½ hour before we reached our spot where the battalion rested. It was decided that 2ed section of C Company would be the second rotation of pickets. While on picket duty we heard B Company get hit by the rebs. The rest of C Company formed up to enter the fight the pickets were pulled in so that if needed we could go into the fight as a reserve group. We were called back to return to our ranks. We then proceeded to form a line of battle to go into the fight as needed. We were not needed in the fight so once the engagement was over we went to the side of the road and made small fires. Five rebs were testing to see if we were trigger happy by firing at out pickets. Then B Company was being hit again so we formed up and we marched to the road and then we marched toward where the confederates were at and we had to wait to fire because the rest of the battalion was running. We fired a few rounds into the reb line and redeployed in the breast works that B Company had made earlier the same day. The rebs formed up ½ way down the hill that the breast works were on, and slowly marched towards the breast works where and where the 63rd Indiana was waiting. We held our fire until we saw their chests then opened fire and had a constant flow of hot lead flying towards the reb battle line. The rebs kept marching towards the breast works and they fired as they marched toward us. They got to the point where we didn’t have time to reload so our rifles turned into clubs, and we fiercely fought in hand to hand combat. We repelled the reb attack and took 2 prisoners from the 54th Georgia. We didn’t see any action for the rest of the night. While I was on picket duty with my file partner we were instructed to allow any rebs that passed us to pass and in there were 5 or less to let them pass, and if it was a whole company to yell rebs coming post 4 and hide under our gum blankets. Some time early in the morning was a third reb captured, in a small engagement which lasted just a few minutes.

We woke up and got ready to move out. We formed up on the road and around 5:30am we started marching in line of battle towards the pine tree line where the reb pickets were. We hoped to press the reb pickets back but they were recalled and we caught them as they were going back to the main reb body. We pressed them using street fighting and we came upon part of the main body and continued to press them and they kept retreating or surrendering to the 63rd Indiana and it got to the point where we were not taking any more prisoners because we didn’t want to have more prisoners then men in our unit. We cased the reb army all the way out of the woods and out of the event.

Great event everything seemed to go very smoothly i wouldnt change anything.

James LaLone
Sally Port Mess

Irishvol79
03-16-2010, 01:00 AM
As I recall the event guidelines also said no repeating rifles and I saw plenty of Henry's as we breached the fort on Saturday.
Hats off to Brian Hicks for an event well done!!!

coastaltrash
03-16-2010, 01:18 AM
First off, Mr. Spain, I'm sorry you felt some of the commands and the commanders were stupid, more so, I'm sorry others felt that way. I've sent you a PM in order for you to directly voice any criticism and opinions to me personally as I was the Chief Idiot of the Confederacy and if my actions directly affected the outcome of anyone's weekend then I apologize.

Now, my heels are BLACK and BLUE! I woke up Saturday morning to the news that Tripp could not be there and was a little perplexed. Due to a series of unfortunate events, I went from commanding the Independent Rifles that weekend, to commanding the WIG, to commanding a smaller hand picked battalion. I say hand picked, because it was mostly made up of guys I work with on a regular basis. I have no delusions about the fact that a great number of people in this hobby do not like me, even though I would guarantee the vast majority of those people have never spoken to me. So when the word got passed down to me that I would be in charge of "Mercer's Brigade" for the weekend, I was not really looking forward to it. The fact that happened with about 30 minutes warning from step off didn't help. But, life is tough.

I attempted to follow the orders handed down to me by "Division" (ie The Event Staff- See attachments) and while some thought this was a tactical, I hope most now know there was a scripted set of order the commanders had to follow. That should be known to the Confederates, because if Skip didn't have a script, he would have been REAL aggressive. Saturday we were ordered to advance to the East/West Road, which we did, and Sunday we were ordered to rejoin division, taking essentially the same route we went down the day before. Rather than pitch an assault, I figured a series of delay and retreat action was the right way to do it. Did I push the CS column too hard? Probably. But I did it so we could get out quicker. I fell out. With no water, I took a few handfuls of peanuts offered to me and started catching cramps and fagged out the last 10 minutes. So my punishment for that was not getting to look everyone of the CS participants in the eyes, shake their hands and tell them thank you for putting up with my demanding and cantankerous nature for the weekend.

I want to also take this time to publicly thank Co H 57th Georgia that are pictured in this thread. I told Jay Stevens and TJ I was going to run the guy to death, and I darn sure tried. They were at the advance of the column the vast majority of the time Saturday, and covered our retreat a lot of the time on Sunday. After all that, they stood the first guard mount on Saturday evening as well. I was proud to have them for the weekend, and think I can speak for the guys in the Independent Rifles when I say if our paths ever meet, I hope you guys find a home at an event with us, it was an extreme pleasure.

Thank you to Hicks and Company for putting on THE most demanding event, both physically and mentally, I have ever been a part of. Thanks to Nate Petersburg for serving as my Sgt Major of 1st Battalion as well as Kaelin Vernon for serving as 1st Battalion's Adjutant. Thank you to Russel Dykes for stepping up at the last minute to command the Independent Rifles Company as well. To Mr. Hancock, Comer, Cooper, Lewis, Dykes, Ricketts and Bruegger and NCOs, job well done. And to Kiev, the commander of 2nd Battalion, thank you very much for your continued friendship on the field and off.

BenjaminLDavis
03-16-2010, 02:16 AM
Hey to all,

Very tough event, and a great memory. My thanks to all who worked so hard to bring
this one off (and the Rebs do not know what they missed by way of rations unless they
captured some of that soft bread - I was as happy as a real soldier not to see hardtack!)
My special thanks to those who helped my good friend Poague in his time of trouble.

Memories: rain, rain, cold, rain. It never rained hard, just constantly. I think I was
dry (mostly) once for about an hour. Felt very real. Very little sleep for anybody.
And the mud. Sunday's march out, a Johnnie standing there as we went by, holding
something in his hand - we had a conversation in four syllables: "Oh - o!" says I.
"Un - Hunh!" says he. He was holding the entire bottom of his brogan, sole and heel
pulled loose by the mud.
Saturday's battle - I was on our left at first, down in a shallow ravine, using my Spencer
to help hold them off, then up near the road, then across the road in some trees, watching
the whole attack on our fortifications there, firing as fast as I could. The entire Confederate
force hesitated, recoiling at the effects of our fire, until a few of our men shrank back a few
paces ~ this was all it took, and with a yell they advanced. But Captain Reinholz had seen
what was coming, formed up most of the men down by the road in a flanking line, and pushed up
into the treeline to lay down fire on the advancing Rebs. The Confederate commander saw he
was caught between two fires, and they retreated. I will not soon forget those images.

I have rarely been to an event where so many comrades were so well schooled in what
it was like to be a common soldier that if someone needed help, extra food, a kind word,
whatever, it was done with good grace and sense of humor that you will not find in any
normal bunch (hell, what normal bunch would do this and find it fun!) We will never go
on to the next world saying "We could have . . ."
We did.
Attached is a pic Jasper took at the event - it was one of those rare moments when it
was not drizzling. What a great start to the 2010 season!!

sam H
03-16-2010, 03:56 AM
I Left for the event puking my guts up with food poisoning on Thursday. Finally walked through the door of my apartment after a mile long trek home from the Greyhound station. It was worth it. Had an awesome time doing research and helping put together Company H. Spent the weekend with the best group of guys I have met in the Hobby in almost 15 years. Suprisingly my feet are not sore and I only have one hot spot. I spent the weekend with some wet rags around my feet and shoes that fell completley apart after the first mile of the march.
It was good Seeing Mark Susnis and Tiny Grimes for the first time in a while. Almost made me wish I had done federal to spend the weekend hanging out with them.

Thanks to Pat Landrum for Letting Company H do our thing. And Thanks to Brian Hicks for putting on a Bad Ass event. This event will be a tough one to top in my book.

Benedict
03-16-2010, 07:37 AM
taking notice of the amount of effort those of us in Co. H, 57th GA made to not only look right, but to do it right, too.

Way to go. Keep up that good work!

Hope everybody had a great event. I knew I would regret not coming over for this one ...

Jeremy Bevard
03-16-2010, 08:08 AM
I used a knapsack at the event because the guildlines left a loophole for them. If it had said "No Knapsacks" I would have gone without as I plan to do at Crampton's Gap which has that wording. Jon is right and the guildines do state "no repeating rifles" for this event. Two men in our company were told no when asked to bring theirs. An apology has already been sent to them. Anyhow, having them in the works Saturday to hold off the Rebs was nice so I won't complain!

usmcskipper
03-16-2010, 11:24 AM
This was my first EBUFU event and I LOVED it! I have been reenacting for nearly 30 years by starting as a drummer just before the 125th events and this was my number one Civil War experience in all that time. This was the first event in which I lived the life of a Civil War soldier and I look forward to attending more with the great people I met at the event.

Fortunately, my job as an infantryman already had me prepared for the physical part of the event and some of my pards went hiking with me in our gear to prepare for the event so that side was no problem for us. I think the event planners and staff did a fantastic job with the event. The rations were great, the terrain was incredible (although Eastern North Carolina is flatter but the rain was fitting for E. NC!), the water points were well placed, and everyone I met was extremely friendly and helpful. My biggest complaint was that we were finished at the end of the march on Sunday and I had to return to my modern reality.

I kept a journal during the event and wrote a narrative for folks in a reenactment unit local to my current posting. I attached it here as a PDF so it would take less space. Remember, it is from the perspective of a Pvt in 2nd Plat, Co B so I didn't see everything and definitely did not know the big picture!

Thanks for the great experience and I hope my assignments allow me to attend more!

Old Reb
03-16-2010, 12:03 PM
"I have no delusions about the fact that a great number of people in this hobby do not like me, even though I would guarantee the vast majority of those people have never spoken to me."

Brevet Major Landrum,
I have spoken to you and still don't like you.:cool: I suggest we conduct a poll and see if you are truthful in your statement that a great number of people do not like you. I conducted an internal poll exclusive to Texas Ground Hornets and you will be pleased to know that the favorable opinions far out numbered the negatives. However, it seems that in San Angelo you are hated.

Seriously, Pat, don't waste your time with the whiners and complainers. Just make a list and get them when they sleep. It is how we do things. Carry on.

elcid01
03-16-2010, 12:35 PM
Great event!

Seems most listened to me when i harped about getting in shape. I was happy to see that at the bottom of the hill at the end of the weekend all the smiling faces of B and C companies of the 63rd. We had a tough weekend, and you all performed to the highest standards making me proud to be your commander.

Eric, As usual we make a great team. Sorry for pushing you off the ground cloth into the water during our short slumber on sat night. Cheers my friend for helping me this weekend

Will and jason, could not have asked for better companies this weekend. You performance was superior and knowing that my commanders intent was being carried out to the fullest was a great feeling. Your 2 companies were top rail this weekend and you should be proud!

To all of 63rd IND. I hope you know that I pushed you this weekend, made you taste a little of the real soldiers life. Bottom line your safety was top priority for me, but additionally knew when pushed the effects would be worth it in the long run. Bully for you to stepping up and making the event a success.

Brian, I appreciate all the effort this weekend. you did give the participants a small taste of the extreme hardships those faced who fought this war. Appreciated the ability to make decisions as a commander and allowing us to determine the path of the task.

Commander comments- I came into this weekend knowing i would be outnumbered. I knew there was a loop hole on the repeaters. The 63rd IND did NOT have repeaters, BUT there are accounts in their Brigade that some did private purchase them while in DC. This allowed for me to make use of the limited manpower with a more effective weapon system.

We did stick to our task in the orders. we were content with staying in the high ground fort we established. As most realized with out that we would not have with held the Johnny charge on Sat. I thought all the deserters, prisoners, criminals, and contraband who were in my possession made for some interesting situations and added to the difficulty/headaches of command. Well done on the additional senerios. One thing that made it more real as a commander were these factors. Most don't realize that just leading men in battle is not all that the commander would worry about. this was held true with this weekend. When my men were short on rounds grabbing the shotty ammo from the rebs replenished the boxes of my men. As for the deserters, i would make then sign the oath, empty their boxes then push them on their way home. We treated the reb prisoners better than the "rapist". At one point if he didn't keep his mouth shut I was going to shackle him to the tree ( I was about 2 secs from actually doing this, as i was getting them out) Mr milberts interjection was your only saving grace.

All in all a great weekend and enjoyed the pleasure of leading such a hard working fine group of men.

Bully to you all!

Skip

Hank Trent
03-16-2010, 12:55 PM
A year ago, Brian Hicks asked me if I'd be willing to portray a prisoner at this event. He explained that he wanted something to be a handicap for whichever side needed it, and guarding a prisoner on the march would suck up logistics and resources. He wanted it to be a serious crime so the guards would have to take their job seriously, and suggested something like a spy. I recruited another fellow to do it with me, and we were going to go with a generic role, but I decided to see if I could find any real people.

I found no spies, but it turned out that several war criminals on the federal side were actually being taken to Goldsboro for trial at the same time and place as the event setting. I couldn't find anything equivalent on the CS side, but Brian assigned us to the US side, so that made it easy.

Most of the easiest-to-find information was available for two men, Pvt. James Preble (http://books.google.com/books?id=UiATAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA81&lpg=PA81&dq=%22james+preble%22+%22sixty-third+indiana%22+date:0-1865&source=bl&ots=5j5isaa-fl&sig=6nQBn7JyebIMTNnehAv2MEq2_GA&hl=en&ei=SJ-fS4DzHYjmM-O_-cIM&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CA0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22james%20preble%22%20%22sixty-third%20indiana%22%20date%3A0-1865&f=false) of the 12th NY Cavalry and Sgt. A. W. McCarty (http://www.78ohio.org/Scandal/Scandal.htm) of the 78th Ohio Infantry. With Brian's permission, we decided to portray them. As Brian announced at the end of the event, we don't know what regiment escorted Preble between Kinston and Goldsboro, but the chaplain of the 63rd Indiana was one of the two chaplains at his execution.

A few days before the event, I found out that our "Sgt. McCarty" got a new job and couldn't get the time off from work, so it would be just me. Normally, I'd never do a cold weather event alone, because I do not do well at all in cold weather and always pre-plan one or more people to share blankets, spooning, etc. On the other hand, I was mystified by the "prayer meetings" requiring kneeling and removing hats on Sunday's march, since it took me a while to figure out it was to help cool off the men, as I hadn't broken a sweat yet in my overshirt and greatcoat. So being 10 degrees cooler than everyone else does have advantages. :)

Brian and Josh were kind enough to work around that and allow me access to Art Milbert the Federal event controller to be a liaison if necessary for health reasons. As it turned out, I was warm enough both nights with all the cold-weather gear I'd borrowed and brought, but was glad to know I had permission to get help quickly if a problem arose. It was comforting to know that the organizers always had our safety in mind while simultaneously trying to kill us with the mud and hills of LBL. :)

So with that all squared away, I got locked into manacles and taken out Friday night to the Federal camp, where Brian, portraying a Federal officer, handed me over with orders. I'd agreed that if necessary, I'd do the whole event in manacles. I wasn't sure how that would go, but it amazed me that they didn't bother me at all psychologically. Most of the time, I forgot I had them on, except when I needed to do something. Since I was handcuffed in front, I could get to my canteen and haversack even though it was a little awkward, so they really weren't a problem, but as it turned out, I only had to wear them a short while Friday night and Saturday morning.

This isn't really saying much since I'm not in military camp at many events, but this was absolutely by far the most realistic military camp I'd ever been in, from start to finish. Absolutely. I've been to too many campaign events that are more like theme backpacking outside of the battles, but this was incredible.

As far as the rest of the story, Pvt. Preble was given a court martial in Goldsboro in late March and executed (http://web.cortland.edu/woosterk/Preble_J.html) for the attempted rape of Mrs. Rebecca Drake, 23, and Miss Louise Jane Bedard, her cousin, 17, and rape of Miss Letitia Craft, her aunt, 58, near Kinston NC back on the afternoon of 16 March 1865. His execution shows up in several diaries, letters and a civilian memoir, and the crime itself was passed down in the civilian family, so the whole thing is fairly well documented. Most everything I said to anybody during the event was based on real historical information (or the closest I could remember at the time :o ), other than the fact that Preble was 24 years old and I'm, well, not.

Definitely a different kind of role, but hopefully I accomplished the organizers' goal to provide annoyance for the Federals. Overall, the event was great, the mud march was probably pretty typical of spring and fall marches so that was cool, and I had a great time.

(edited to add: is it just my computer, or do the hyperlinks look blank unless you hover over them? Weird.)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

ney
03-16-2010, 01:12 PM
It was a great event. Mr Trent I enjoyed your portrayal. Thanks for everyone that but in the effort.

Hank Trent
03-16-2010, 01:28 PM
We treated the reb prisoners better than the "rapist". At one point if he didn't keep his mouth shut I was going to shackle him to the tree ( I was about 2 secs from actually doing this, as i was getting them out) Mr milberts interjection was your only saving grace.

Manacling me to the tree wouldn't have been a problem, since I'd actually agreed to wear them the whole event if needed, though of course you didn't know that. They were actually kind of interesting as something different to experience, though of course "Pvt. Preble" didn't like them.

But the separation between being the hated rapist and being a fellow reenactor was something the other prisoner and I had talked about before the event, and we actually discussed the Stanford prisoner experiment (http://www.prisonexp.org/). When the other prisoner couldn't attend and I realized I'd have no one to help me deal with the cold, I actually wrote Brian and Josh about it after they made arrangements with Art Milburt as a liaison:

"The only problem I can see is that I'll be annoying and complaining as part of my event duties, but then if I really do run into health problems with the cold, I'll still be annoying and complaining and nobody will pay attention, because *they're* not too cold, so they'll assume I'm not either. In that case, I can just ask specifically for Art (by whatever his rank/name will be) and he'll understand."

In hindsight, I actually stayed warm enough Saturday night just as I hoped and expected, so it was all moot. But that evening, I thought it would save you some 21st century bother if I got quick permission in the evening for the guards to let me warm up at a fire if I suspected real-life hypothermia, rather than needing to go through the chain of command and wake you-all at 2 a.m. or, worse yet, have to fight for permission while actually undergoing a health problem.

I was surprised a quick two-sentence out-of-character conversation didn't work. My guard "got it," but couldn't get it passed on to the officers. It was certainly unnerving to say, "out of character, can I speak to you about a 21st century health problem," and still be treated like a rapist instead of a reenactor and not be allowed to talk. I'm all for first person, but believe it or not, I'm also a stickler for respecting others' modern health and safety. Thank god for Art. But that's why we planned it that way, so I was pleased with the organizers' attention to real-life health and safety, which made the rest fun.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Pvt_Sullivan
03-16-2010, 02:00 PM
Hank,

One quick question... when I schmoosed the guards on Saturday Morning and kneeled down to offer you some hot coffee that you refused, was that because you were being a hard case or that you just don't like coffee?

Hank Trent
03-16-2010, 02:12 PM
Hank,

One quick question... when I schmoosed the guards on Saturday Morning and kneeled down to offer you some hot coffee that you refused, was that because you were being a hard case or that you just don't like coffee?

In real life, I try to avoid caffeine, but for most events I kinda sorta fudge and drink some and act like I miss it if I don't have it, to seem like a normal 19th century person. For this event, I decided it would be simple to just be a hard case and act like I was pissed off at my captors and refuse some favors, and that would be an easy solution to the caffeine issue. So the answer is, um, yes. :)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Jeremy Bevard
03-16-2010, 02:26 PM
Hank,

Sorry about your 21st century concern not being well addressed. The guard never passed on the "out of character" portion of the conversation. At the HQ fire we all thought you were just being a pain in our a@#'s. If it is the guard I am thinking of he was in my company and this was his first cph event so he might have been confused or not understanding. I actually thought you were trying to sweet talk, what you though would be a weaker guard into things that should not be allowed. So, I told the Sgt to replace the guard. I did hear Skip ask Art if everything was really ok in a whisper once it got that far. I am impressed you never built a fire that night. I was freezing with a small fire!! I am glad it worked out.

Eric Fair
03-16-2010, 02:26 PM
When I first accepted Skip’s invitation to serve as the battalion Adjutant, I was excited by the opportunity to manage a battalion while on campaign. As our expectation for numbers declined, we debated changing my role to something somewhat more diminished (a demotion, I should say, that I would have gladly accepted). In the end, we decided to stick with ADJ for me, and I’m very happy we did. I really enjoyed the opportunity to oversee and log the orders received, recording the numbers for men, ammunition, and sustenance, establishing the Order of March, recording guard rotations, etc. (and having all that information readily available for the CO). This event also provided an unexpected dimension – interviewing all of the incoming prisoners/deserters, civilians, and even a runaway slave that entered our lines (I ran out of loyalty oaths!). I had a great time, and I only hope that my efforts added to the event for everyone.

Overall on the Federal side of things, I was really impressed with many of the impressions, the demeanor of the men, and efficiency with which the battalion worked.

Skip, a pleasure to work with you as always.

Will Eichler and Jason Reinholz, were excellent Company Commanders and made my job easy. Their platoon LT’s (Jeremy Bevard and Chris Irelan) were equally as good.

All of the NCO’s were outstanding. Sunday morning Sgt. Liechty reached down to wake me with one hand and gave me his morning and guard reports with the other! Saturday night we had a deserter come into the ranks, and Sgt. Blunt immediately informed me of the situation and of the prisoner’s status. These are just a couple of memories that jump out at me.

I thought the concept of providing maps and orders worked really well. In fact, it forced us to stay on our toes most of the weekend, as we were constantly on the lookout for new and revised orders, especially Saturday afternoon as we were afraid to get too comfortable in our position only to be told to move. The Sunday march, while taxing, provided the experience that many of the men of ’61-’65 knew well – marching – in bad weather, over difficult terrain, and with lousy footing. To Brian Hicks, Josh Fieldhouse, and our guide, Art Milbert (who did a great job quietly keeping me informed as to our location on the Sunday march), many thanks for a well-run event.

Thanks one and all – I look forward to the next one (and I echo Mark Susnis’ request – let’s do a Henry/Donelson scenario!)

Pvt_Sullivan
03-16-2010, 02:37 PM
In real life, I try to avoid caffeine, but for most events I kinda sorta fudge and drink some and act like I miss it if I don't have it, to seem like a normal 19th century person. For this event, I decided it would be simple to just be a hard case and act like I was pissed off at my captors and refuse some favors, and that would be an easy solution to the caffeine issue. So the answer is, um, yes. :)

Thanks Hank... as always it was a pleasure interacting with you in the 19th Century and having new and different experiences.

PogueMahone
03-16-2010, 02:37 PM
First and foremost, I want to thank Jason Rienholz publicly for helping me get out of the woods Sunday morning. He didn't have to, I kept telling him I was fine, but he came back to check on me again and took my bedroll away from me and carried it for me. I was struggling with those slick hillsides and a sore hip.

Other random thoughts in no particular order:

* I could have used more Back and less Water.

* When you are on guard duty, and it is after Lights Out, and clearly everyone around you is trying to sleep, don't talk loudly. In fact, don't talk. Be considerate of others. Otherwise, others may be driven to desperate acts to silence you. I had to tell the same guys to be quiet twice Friday night and I was certain that my first death threat was sufficient. By the way, when you whispered "Mr. Smotherman is grouchy!", Mr. Smotherman was still wide awake and heard your whispered conversation and only got madder. Seriously, what part of "Be Quiet!" did you not understand?

* Overall well executed event plan. Plenty of water and land, the two most important things any event can have.

* I knew the back story to Hank's character and it was funny listening to the rumors in camp about him. Some real grapevine action.

* As always, it was good seeing old friends and making new ones. I was glad to help Pete B. celebrate his birthday for the second year in a row in the cold, wet woods with a warm bottle.

* The raincoat worked out just fine, thank you Don Smith! It was lighter than a gum or groundcloth and just as effective and much more convenient to wear.

* Second platoon, Company B was a great bunch of guys that worked well together.

thanks,

Hank Trent
03-16-2010, 02:39 PM
Sorry about your 21st century concern not being well addressed.

Not a problem at all. That's why the organizers had Art as a go-between, to sort out exactly those kind of crossed-wires, and it worked perfectly, so no complaints here.


I am impressed you never built a fire that night. I was freezing with a small fire!! I am glad it worked out.

With all the winter gear I was packing, I figured it would be warmer to snuggle down in my nest and not come out, rather than hoping I'd wake up often enough to keep a fire going and alternately being warm enough and cold again as it died down. As luck had it, I was right, but it could have gone the other way, too.

I totally admired the CS prisoners who came in with almost no gear and worn-out clothes. There's no way I could have handled the cold like that, but it was very, very cool to see it done, and it really gave a sense of how the Confederacy was worn down to nothing.

Just a great all-around event.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Spinster
03-16-2010, 02:55 PM
As far as the rest of the story, Pvt. Preble was given a court martial in Goldsboro in late March and executed (http://web.cortland.edu/woosterk/Preble_J.html) for the attempted rape of Mrs. Rebecca Drake, 23, and Miss Louise Jane Bedard, her cousin, 17, and rape of Miss Letitia Craft, her aunt, 58, near Kinston NC back on the afternoon of 16 March 1865. His execution shows up in several diaries, letters and a civilian memoir, and the crime itself was passed down in the civilian family, so the whole thing is fairly well documented. Most everything I said to anybody during the event was based on real historical information (or the closest I could remember at the time :o ), other than the fact that Preble was 24 years old and I'm, well, not.


(edited to add: is it just my computer, or do the hyperlinks look blank unless you hover over them? Weird.)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

Hank, indeed that hyperlink does not appear unless the cursor is over it--your comment gave me a clue to look for it and follow it out. That linkage provides various military accounts. I'd be most interested in the civilian accounts, especially civilian testimony of the order of events. I've got a related piece of oral history from Western North Carolina and a theory I'd like to explore, based on the ages of the women.

lambrew
03-16-2010, 03:23 PM
Thank you all for the great event! Mr. Trent's unique impression was a highlight. As well as the Confederate impressions. Watching them fight over the cooking fire was as fine a piece of first person I have ever witnessed. The thread bare appearance of our captives was a pitiful sight, and I was getting cold just looking at you fellows. My hats off for the first rate impression. We were well led, and well fed, And I thank you for the experience this weekend. I now have a better understanding of muddy roads and how quickly they can turn into an impassable morass. We chopped them up with only a few feet passing through. What thousands of feet plus wagons and animals would have done I can only imagine.

My respect for the people we portray has grown a thousand fold with just a taste of what they went through. All my bad days pale in compairson.
Thank you again, and it was fun toughing it out with all of you.

fortdonelsonrelics
03-16-2010, 04:49 PM
Just a quick thanks for all those that came by the shop over the weekend - I'm glad the weather eased up a bit for everyone.

John Walsh

trippcor
03-16-2010, 05:53 PM
Well it sounds like this was an event to remember. I want to say how sorry I am that I was not able to make it. The travel experience from h - e - double hockey sticks caused me to miss the event. Saturday morning found me still in Dallas Texas trying to get any flight out to the southeast. Finally ended up in Birmingham AL and rented a car to get home. The whole time I was wishing I was with you all in the field.

Thanks to Patrick Landrum for taking command of the Confederate forces. He was thrust into a tough job on no notice.

Mtn.Guerilla
03-16-2010, 05:55 PM
Many thanks to Brian and company for all the effort they put forth. This event gave us exactly as what they advertised, and in turn this event provided a reality check for those not expecting or prepared for the long marches we endured, physically and mentally. Personally this the type of "long march" event that I had yet had a chance to participate in. Being a buisness owner I'm not alloted (at the moment) time off for events like ITPW. This was my first trip to LBL and the incredible terrain really helped to "get my mind right".

Like many have already stated, this event provided me the opprotunity to come closer to a true CW expierence than I ever have. During Saturdays march, I tried to go about daily soldier life, as if I wasn't on the march, much like many accounts I've read. I had my breakfast on the march, brushed my teeth on the march, penned a few details in my journal on the march, and I even manged to sew back the crotch in my trousers while on the march. Even at one point I found myself marching and not really knowing it, but sort of off in dreamland, sort of out of body. When I snapped back for a split second I thought I had traveled back in time. It was a very strange expeirence.

The impressions for the most part on the Confederate side were very good, but as stated I have to take my hat off to the gentlmen in company H for their impressions. They really allowed me to have a few "period moments" that will always be in my mind, and have set the bar very high on Confederate impressions and attitude. Bully of a job ! There were a few guys that I wanted to point them out to and say, quit yer' whining and learn something from those boys. They made a big impact on my own way of thinking. Thanks!

I wanted thank Mr. Comer and company A, as well as my borthers in the AG. For the most part first person was honored and we all worked together in taking care of each other.On Sundays march I even carried the gear of wounded comrade for several miles, as did others in our group, doubling our load !

One highlight for me was the fella' that deserted to the Feds on Saturday night. I heard yelling for someone to halt and then a gunshot. All you heard was someone hauling a** down the road, then with a flash, you saw someone appear out of the dark. When he ran past me I yelled at him then fired, I saw his gray uniform and discerned he was a deserter. That was a very cool image that will stay me.

There were almost too many moments to mention. But I was wet, cold, muddy, gettin' stove up from basically living on parched corn, and brought four ticks back to Chattanooga. Oh and my calves are as tight as 10,000 rubberbands.

In short, it was a superb event !

Kace
03-16-2010, 06:58 PM
I would like add my heart felt thanks to the organizers and participant for the event. It was one of the greatest learning experiences of my life. I learn a lot about myself and about the time period and the men we portray. While I could fill pages with praise for the planners an participants, I won't as much of it has been covered. I will share my two biggest take aways from the event. 1) I can do with less than I thought I could: less gear, less food, less sleep.... 2)I do not like blanket rolls. Sorry I tried it but just cant seem to get the hang of one.

One thing for the event planners to think about for their next event - signage. When we hit the event site at 1:30 am on Friday morning I would have been great to see a couple of signs indicating that we were in the right place.

Kace

Hank Trent
03-16-2010, 06:58 PM
I'd be most interested in the civilian accounts, especially civilian testimony of the order of events. I've got a related piece of oral history from Western North Carolina and a theory I'd like to explore, based on the ages of the women.

My apologies. I went to look at the civilian source again on Ancestry.com and it looks like the genealogist just picked up the same information from the military sources and didn't actually get it from an independent family account.

Sergeant McCarty's witness testimony transcript (http://www.78ohio.org/Scandal/Scandal.htm) is available though and might have some useful information (I forced an underline of that hyperlink, so let's see if it looks visible) and I expect that Preble's may have survived in some archives too, but I haven't seen it. Still, McCarty's transcript does give a bit more graphic information on his activities.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com

robert-m
03-16-2010, 07:43 PM
I wanted thank Mr. Comer and company A, as well as my borthers in the AG. For the most part first person was honored and we all worked together in taking care of each other.On Sundays march I even carried the gear of wounded comrade for several miles, as did others in our group, doubling our load !


I am sorry about the more than doubling the load of my fellow men. I tried as much as possible. I know now that I need to dry stuff out as much as possible. Thank you to all that helped me get my gear back. I ended up going to the doctor Monday morning. The meds that I took allowed me to make it out, but barley. Again thank you to all.

jwoodli
03-16-2010, 08:42 PM
Did anybody catch the serial number of the rifle that busted my mouth as we (well some of us) hit the Federal works on Saturday? Awesome event.

Michael Comer
03-16-2010, 09:26 PM
I know that didn't feel good but I have to admit when we reformed the company after that fracas and you were standing there with a bloody mouth and Davis next to you with blood all over his hand from wrestling with a bramble bush on the way in to the attack, it sure looked like we'd been in a real scrap I must say.

Jon The Beloved
03-16-2010, 09:50 PM
What about that totally freaked out local who was in the wrong place at the wrong time when we (1st Battalion CS) were looking for a fight? His look and hands up were priceless.. "For God's sakes don't shoot!" We even made a fearful impression on the local fodder. For all I know this man could have been involved in.. event support?

Oh and btw, I keep meeting the best people all around in this hobby.. or maybe I just keep going to all the right events. Well done, all.

PlainOlSmitty
03-16-2010, 10:13 PM
Man, i had a blast marchin n fitin with company h! Nuthin got me goin like chargein yall fedral boy. If i hadnt of got my dander up so much i wouldnt have climbed over the works after buttsrokin( play) one yank, got thrown down by skip and taken as his personal prisoner. I really enjoyed interacting with Hank all night. He kept up the insults n i kept spittin em back. But the best thing was makein new friends. Marty Rubin especially. Their is a bond that is made when two guys spend tha night freezeing, sleeping, eating, smoking etc within enemy works. If it hadnt been for Marty i wouldnt have got no sleep at all. He let me borrow some socks to sleep in, soo i got to sleep the last hour or 2 b4 first light. Marty, your a first rate guy, im glad to have a new "true friend". Over all a good event. Plenty to eat, a short stroll and an intense fight. what more could i have asked for when i did it with the best company in the whole dang Reb army! I just want compant aytch to remember what and AV is.

Hunter Smith.
Liberty Rifles
Independant Volunteers.

"so this one time i got this job workin at a horse farm........."

Mcguire
03-16-2010, 10:24 PM
This was without a doubt the most physically demanding event I have experienced. Having endured rigourous events in the past, to include Fighting Withdrawal, Banks Grand Retreat, and Marmadukes Raid, this event was the first that I fell out from the main body. With about 3 miles to go to the parking area I just had to sit down to regain my strength and over the course had to stop several more times. I'm no spring chicken but I have always been able to hang with the boys. To have to fall out was demoralizing to say the least. It left me wondering whether I should just get out of the hobby; living history doesn't cut it and the thought of doing mainstream is not an option. After reading some of the posts I feel a little bit better about these concerns. I guess I''l just have to choose my battles with a bit more srutiny in the future.

To Mike Comer and the boys in Co. A: thanks for the commraderie and a great experince. To my file partner (you know who you are) You obviousley didn't read the impression guidelines and you didn't even try to stay in first person! Thanks for ruining the moment! Mike, it was a pleasure to serve under you once again. You always look after your boys and we always appreciate it. You are the type of commander anyone would follow to the death!

Great job by all of the Confederate Commanders, often times this is a thankless job and until those that would condemn your performance have walked a mile in your shoes they have no right to criticize. Patrick, detached, aloof, and somewhat irritable would have probably been the norm for Confederate commanders especially at this time in the war. Thrust into roles that they weren't prepared for due to attrition, having to endure scarcity, four years of suffering, and finally continuing to wage war in a lost cause would have had a profound effect on behavior. Great job this weekend! Some people just can't seperate the impression from the person behind it.

BrianHicks
03-17-2010, 12:13 AM
219 Total registered.

170 Signed in at registration and were active on Saturday morning.

142 Men were active at the start of the march on Sunday morning.

In 24 Hours of active campaigning, 24 men were attrited.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Federals had 74 Registered

Total number of Federals on the field at the start of the event: 57

On Sunday Morning they were down to 52 who started the march out.

-Company C had 30 men at the event on Saturday Morning:

They had 27 make the walk out on Sunday.

-Company B had 27 Men at the event on Saturday Morning:

25 Walked out on Sunday Morning

Confederates had 127 Registered.

Total number of Confederates on the field at the start of the event: 99.

On Sunday Morning they were down to 76 who started the march out.

Partisans had 18 Registered.

14 participated in the event.

Coatsy
03-17-2010, 01:15 AM
Well Brian beat me to the punch, but there is a discrepancy since I forgot to count the Ken, myself, Kaelin, Nate, Landrum, and Chad in our Saturday numbers..... I don't care anymore since the war is almost over anyway.... I need to get back to Georgia!!!!!

At the event the Confederate forces had a unique opportunity to portray portions of 2 regiments of Mercer’s Georgia Brigade. Pat Landrum’s force was portraying portions the 57th Georgia and Kiev Thomason’s force was portraying portions of the 54th Georgia. I say “portions” because according to the documentation the men had been strung out on their travels from Winter Quarters in Mississippi to the Carolinas. Colonel C. Olmstead the usual commander of the brigade had gotten permission to go back to Georgia to round up men on “French Leave.” So the rag tag commands were not uncommon at this time.

57th Georgia

Rickett’s Company: 11
Lewis’ Company: 13
Dyckes’ Company: 8
Bruegger’s Company: 21
Staff: 3

Total: 56

54th Georgia

Hancock’s Company: 14
Cooper’s Company: 9
Comer’s Company: 23
Staff: 1

Total: 47

Brigade Staff: 3

Grand Total: 106

Picket Duty went well enough in the drizzle/rain/wind/cold.. Thank you to all the men of the brigade who stood guard like the men of old. We had one deserter escape during the 10pm to Midnight shift. Sgt Roberts and others told the cowardly deserter (all fun and games here) to halt and then fired upon the man. The deserter received the same welcome form the Federals as we all heard…..

Bruegger’s Company 4-6 pm
Cooper’s Company 6-8 pm
Dycke’s Company 8-10 pm
Comer’s Company 10 pm-Midnight
Lewis’ Company Midnight – 2am
Hancock’s Company 2 am – 4am
Rickett’s Company 4am to 6am

Very exciting stuff!

Sunday was a bit different though. We went from 106 to 76.. Yikes! Prisoners, injuries, and Skunk Ape takes a toll!!!!

My morning reports were either captured or soaked and made illegible. Only by the quick thinking of Lt. Vernon doing a head count of the brigade did the Sunday totals come out in a reasonable sense. Kaelin thank you very much!

It was an interesting event from a staff roll. The constant rain made it difficult to take the time to tally the numbers when. It seemed to always drizzle or rain when I had a chance to compute the totals. Also at this time historical returns for these two units are almost impossible to find. I went with the standard company morning reports and weapons inspections. Then up to battalion morning reports and battalion weapons inspections. My form 13s and 14s got soaked and were useless and one of my form 3’s got used to start a fire…. (Schnapps don’t have a heart attack I had not filled it out yet) Interesting note: The “brigade staff” ended up splitting up between the two commands. Our bugler went with Captain Landrum and the two remaining staff weenies Ken Cornett and some Herb guy went to assist Captain Thomason seeing as his battalion staff was on French Leave in Augusta, Ga.

The stepping up of the “junior” officers to take charge of the companies, and senior captains getting bumped up to battalion and brigade commands made for an interesting command experience.

From my staff weenie vantage point all of the Secehs company commanders did an outstanding job. From Lt. Hancock’s quiet and noble bearing to Lt. Bruegger’s daredevils the command had its different styles of leadership, but they melded together to form a rag tag band of Johnny’s that worked well together. Captain’s Thomason and Landrum did an outstanding job in their positions. (wanted or not!) I was slightly embarrassed that I was not in camp Friday PM to help direct arrivals to their company camps, but alas I was helping ferry participants to their respective drop off points. Lt. Jones of Comer’s Company filled in for me and I appreciate that

Finally to all of the men that I was able to serve with this weekend... Thank you very much for just being there and going through the event recreating the men of 1865 to the best of your ability. I've been very very tired of this whole hobby since after that event that cannot be named last November. If you can believe it in some bizarre way this event helped remind me how much I like being a moron and camping on the ground and eating salty pork. (sho am good!)

Art, Bill, Josh, and that Crazy Brian guy get mad thumbs up for a unique, challenging, and ultimately rewarding event. It wasn't perfect, but it came very close to what I've read in those history books that we read every now and again.

Also I swear I had a Yearby/Baker/Aufmuth/Ox/Mobely/Holler sighting, but I attribute that to severe fatigue.

sam H
03-17-2010, 03:27 AM
Brueggers company actually had 18. 2 guys were no where to be found friday and one cut up his hand soon after ariving to camp. The original Company H at Bentonville had 1 captain 2 Lts. 4 NCO's and 13 privates. So we came pretty close.

Hairy Nation Boys
03-17-2010, 08:48 AM
"Also I swear I had a Yearby/Baker/Aufmuth/Ox/Mobely/Holler sighting, but I attribute that to severe fatigue. "

I was not there. Must have been fatigue.

unclefrank
03-17-2010, 09:28 AM
Did anybody catch the serial number of the rifle that busted my mouth as we (well some of us) hit the Federal works on Saturday? Awesome event.

Or the hobnailed boot that broke one of my toes and sprained the rest of the foot

Greg Barnett
03-17-2010, 10:30 AM
Backwaters.

demoralizing: to deprive (a person or persons) of spirit, courage, discipline, etc.; destroy the morale of: The continuous mud sucking march demoralized the infantry.

Good Times.

Old Reb
03-17-2010, 10:54 AM
Well, I admit it, we were there, but we did no harm to women or children because there weren't any women and children to harm. Below is what my AAR would be if partisans wrote AAR's.


Despite the loss of one third of the effective combat team from the onset including me due to the fact the three squads became separated early Saturday morning while moving in the creek bottoms east of Tharp road the remainder of the team managed to cross north of Tharp road and achieved all objectives of the mission. Cut off behind enemy lines and with shortages of water and adverse weather conditions the operation was successful in forcing the enemy to divert needed resources to defend against a much smaller harassing force and plagued the enemy on its movement out of the area. I contribute this to the quality of the men in the group with special praise for squad leaders Johnson and Mobley who showed expert leadership under adverse conditions. I submit the names of the following men for there above and beyond actions in the Backwaters area.

Adam Johnson
Cody Mobley
Jared Nichols
Geoff Lehman
Ryan Johnson
Caleb Henson
Frank Aufmuth
Cornbread
Joe Allport

wounded:
Steve Boecker

MIA:
Fred Baker
Jake
Holler
Uncle Tom

Submitted 15th March 1865
Tom Smyth
Captain Yadkin Independent Scouts

Phantom Captain
03-17-2010, 11:48 AM
Wow,

Had a miserable (GREAT!) time! I want to thank everyone for putting this on and letting us all take part in it. And especially a big thanks to our officers and NCO's who kept it all together and running as smoothly as possible. Finally a HUGE thanks to Lt. Eichler for the sleeping cap (life saver) and 1st Sgt. Roscoe for lending me a wool issue shirt (huge life saver). Thank you!! I am so happy and proud to have been a part of this event.

Highlights for me...

The ration issue, just amazing. That soft bread and cheese for Feds saturday morning really got our spirits up! I truly felt blessed as the soldiers must have when they got more than hardtack and fatty salt horse. Guarding the prisoner friday night was a really neat addition. Me and my guard partner sat there trying to figure out who he was or what he did. No one had given us any details other than we were to guard the prisoner. Moving out saturday morning on the march as our advance platoon cleared terrain feature to terrain feature through the rain and mist. Had a series of period moments through that morning on that march looking at the men and the moving line. Picket duty once we had reached our objective and being stuck standing out there in the rain and cold complaining to the other pickets around me. Awesome! As soon as we got back from that duty one of my section pards mentioned that as soon as we sat down he had a feeling we would get hit. Sure enough, five minutes after sitting down came the warning that Reb skirmishers had been spotted, gear up! Awesome. Being posted as a flanker and spotting Reb pickets moving down from the woods probing us was fantastic. I even got a few shots off at them. Unfortunately as we were moving back to the brestworks one of there pickets managed to skip a ball off the ground and hit me in the back of the calf (pulled my calf muscle pretty bad in actuality). I stuck to it and did what I could being restricted to pretty much one leg and the other on fire with every step. Good times! I took wood duty within the works and did as much as I could.

Saturday night picket duty was one of the most miserable, cold, wet, awful things I've ever done and I'll NEVER forget it. As terrible as it was it was the BEST thing that I took from the event. I've truly had a taste of the misery those men must have felt EVERY DAY. It was incredible. It was so dark in the clouds and rain I couldn't see my hand in front of my face. The rain was constant except at the times where it picked up and poured instead. Me and my picket partner complained that a whole company could move up between the LP's and we wouldn't be able to see or even hear them due to the rain noise. It was total hell and in retrospect truly incredible.

Sunday morning being roused and formed up on the road in the dark was also a period moment I'll never forget. Moving out and being told to muffle everything and stay quiet as the sky just perceptibly lightened. Hitting those Reb pickets and pressing the fight down that road as dawn broke will never be forgotten by me. I pitched in all I could while limping along to the medical wagons. Unfortunately due to my wounding I had to be evacuated out by medical wagon as I could never have made the march through the mud (very pissed about it actually but what can you do. My pards told me that I would never have made it and been stuck out there in the mud so it was the best thing for me to do).

I too got to bring a few (4) wood ticks home with me as new friends! Just like the real soldiers. I'll never forget it and will hold the entire miserable, wet, cold experience always close to my heart.

Thanks to everyone!

Micah Trent
03-17-2010, 12:00 PM
57th Ga. Co. E
1st Battalion
Rickett’s Company

We arrived in camp shortly after dark on Friday evening. Our battalion was camped along a road in some woods, where we spent a good time in the dark trying our best to find wood for fire. After about an hour of gathering wood, we were ordered to go get our rations. The rest of the evening was spent trying to keep the fires stoked, cooking the rations, staying warm as temps were dropping, and get what rest we could get.
The night was cold with little drizzle at times. For the most part it was pretty quiet only hearing sounds travel from men talking around other fires in the woods. Every once in a while you could hear a pack of coyotes off in the distance making noise but that was it.
Shortly before sunlight Saturday morning, we formed company in the street. Our company was at eleven men strong. Once accounted for, we broke camp and fell in as a battalion. Around this time the rain had begun to pick up and many of us were using our ground clothes or whatever we had to wrap around us to keep our clothing and leathers dry.
After little battalion drill, we began our march down the muddiest roads I have traveled on. The rain had made the roads muddy with water standing in spots, and as each man passed and stomped through one spot, it made that one spot tougher to pass through for the next. Other then a short 10 minuet break, we went six miles before our first major stop for water refill. During this time, there was this one big hill we went up that bothered me for the rest of the weekend. While going up, my left hip popped and the pain from it grew more and more with each step I took. I kept pushing forward, but my pace was much slower.
Several miles up the road we finally made contact with the Federal army. After a few rounds we fell back. At this point Runyon and Adams disappeared from our company. I was placed on picket for a while waiting for a possible advance from the enemy, but no advance was made. Typically I am talkative and so forth, but this afternoon I was more then quiet. The pain in my hip was at the point of I quit.
When orders were given to fall in, Clark and I stayed in camp to keep fires going and rest a bit as we were both not feeling capable of moving a few more miles as the boys were going to go out and find the Federal’s somewhere not too far away.
A couple of hours later we were told that camp had been moved and that we were to join our men about a mile in a half up the road. Disgusted and cursing we slowly made our way to our new camp. The dry socks I had just placed on my feet from the earlier march were soaked within minuets going down the road. We arrived at our new camp tired, hurting, and as a typical soldier I complained and cursed the place and the officers.
The rest of the evening I tried to sleep and get rest. Still not saying much, cold, wet and hurting I slept next to a fire. I got some meds which helped some, but never really got to feeling better till sometime late night.
At four a.m. Sunday morning, we were assigned to Picket Duty. I was assigned to first watch and it did not take long to hear movement up ahead on the main road and in the tree lines up ahead. There was movement going on as campfires were blinking in the distance. I reported to Sgt. Ewing what was happening as we were not sure if it was just federal pickets, a company, or if the entire army was on their way.
We acted as a guard as the battalion was formed. We were replaced by another company as we fell in on the battalion. We fell back forming lines at various points. Our company took casualties as Sgt. Ewing, Cpl. Rector, and Privates Clark and myself were done for.
All in all, other then the pain, I had a good time with my pards. The environment, the surrounding, the setting, etc…it was as close as you could get to feeling what the real boys did. It literally kicked my butt and some. The highlight came after the event as I was pulling out of a gas station there in Dover and a Stewart County Sherriff stopped me for speeding. Ugh…

unclefrank
03-17-2010, 03:17 PM
Boy, what a backbreaker that event was. It really made me realize that old men didn't last too long in the ranks. Biggest lesson I learned was that you can't have too much dubbin on your brogans!

yanksaintgood
03-17-2010, 03:58 PM
I wore no socks, other then a slight bit of corduroy over my toes. I ended with not a single blister or rub. Guess that's what being in Co H from 61-65 does to your feet.

P. Bernardo Abbey

Tejano
03-17-2010, 04:11 PM
Tom,
So going to Backwaters is what you ment when you said that you were going hunting.

ColdSteele
03-17-2010, 05:46 PM
More like Back Breaker 1865!

I had the distinct honor to be 2nd Sergeant of C Company, 63rd Indiana. I must say, I was never so proud to see 1st and 2nd platoons Company C moving about as platoons, street fighting as if they had done it together for years!

Saturday night solidified for me the suffering and misery that must have been felt. The rain, the cold, the lack of sleep and then asking men to pack up in near total darkness. Hats off to the privates who endured the lonely post 5 in the pitch black that night!

Thanks to Cpl Parrott (Ian Fullford) and Cpl Waltz (Frank Perkin) for doing such a grand job as 2nd platoon NCO's! You kept your men ready and disciplined - which was a predominant reason the Federals were able to react in the redoubt as we did to on Saturday. Private Mott stood his post 1, which allowed me to get valuable information to the officers of enemy troop movements.

Lieutenants Will Eichler and Jeremy Bevard did an incredible job as our company officers. They asked a lot from the men and I am proud to have seen the men give it to them. Some of the finest officers I served with.

Capt Owens is definitely a commander I want to fall in with again! He listened to the NCO's, cared for the men and came about an inch from wolluping a Reb who, during the attack, climbed the redoubt wall and stole his hat. A comical, but with visible retraint, Capt Owens sent him to rear as yet another prisoner - AFTER retrieving his hat.

As for Hank, the rapist - in keeping period conversation and first person, I recognized your concern for hypothermia when you mentioned that very "non period" word. From that modernism, I went and retrieved the Parson for you to help you with your needs and concerns. Which I hope it did - perhaps not, but I did try to get you help. I commend you for you conduct and persona that you brought to Company C, even though guarding you was somewhat tedious for Sgt Myer and I.

Overall, I had a great time suffering with all you men! The only comment that I might have - keeping the column together in the forced march might have been accomplished more if we actually KNEW what it was. I truly believe, that given the unit integrity that had been established over the weekend, that knowledge of us being needed in a fight would have spurred us on together.

Good Show Boys!

Joseph Zeigler
2nd Sergeant
63rd Indiana, Company C

elcid01
03-17-2010, 06:03 PM
Mr Steele,
You did a fine job as a NCO and set the example for what right looks like! Bully job! Hope to see more of C Company MEN at RTM in the 26th NY VOL.

Cheers,
skip

BenjaminLDavis
03-17-2010, 06:25 PM
219 Total registered.

170 Signed in at registration and were active on Saturday morning.

142 Men were active at the start of the march on Sunday morning.

In 24 Hours of active campaigning, 24 men were attrited.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Federals had 74 Registered

Total number of Federals on the field at the start of the event: 57

On Sunday Morning they were down to 52 who started the march out.

-Company C had 30 men at the event on Saturday Morning:

They had 27 make the walk out on Sunday.

-Company B had 27 Men at the event on Saturday Morning:

25 Walked out on Sunday Morning

Confederates had 127 Registered.

Total number of Confederates on the field at the start of the event: 99.

On Sunday Morning they were down to 76 who started the march out.

Partisans had 18 Registered.

14 participated in the event.

Among the many things that made this event singular was the very real feel: we did not know
enemy numbers, nor they ours. The commanders were given objectives, but the rest evolved
as Skip and Pat planned or improvised. Dispositions could only be guessed at; deserters popped
up out of the foliage, as did men with shotguns.
Rations up front, no more until further notice (implied, never.) Everybody was light on gear.
How Brian Hicks arranged for the wet and the mud I will never know ~ Sgt. Hicks, my hat is
off to you!
The future unknown cannot be overrated ~ it was the very heart of this event. Combined with
the terrain and the weather, it was the benchmark for future events of this type.
Thanks again to all the organizers. I keep thinking about this one, sign of a really fine experience.

BrianHicks
03-17-2010, 07:41 PM
James,

Thank you for the kind words.

The Genesis for this event came out of a Cofffee meeting between Bill Little, Josh Fieldhouse and myself. While Bill deployed a few months before the event, his ideas, as well as those of Josh and Myself are what resulted in the event all of you enjoyed.

SCTiger
03-17-2010, 10:52 PM
I wanted to wait a few days and compose my thoughts before entering my AAR, however; I have decided to not address the event because most of points have already been stated. The event was a test of field skills and endurance, with the added weather factor; the trails accurately reflected the conditions that Civil War Soldiers, and for that fact, "field conditions" for any Soldier from Biblical times to this era.

What amazes me, is that fact that 200 members of this hobby can show up for something like this, drive from distant places and complete the mission. Nothing was called off, shortened or compromised. We have less strenuous or challenging events were 400 or more show up and the complaints are never ending. When I looked up the hill on Sunday behind the column of Confederates and Union adversaries close behind, I was looking at a sight, that was impressive. I was also looking at 90 percent of the dedicated people of the campaigner hobby and about 5 percent of this board. There was many new faces, but plenty of the "old guard" that I have seen over the years, the same Old Guard that shows to up to every event. They drop their ego's, comply with the standards and make it to the event. It's men like this, that keeps the campaigner wing from slipping into a fragmented force that attends "no standards" events only.

If you want an answer to "who are the campaigners" or "who is us", (as Heath would have said), I would look at Mr. Hicks registration`list. Just wanted to thank Kiev, Hicks, Sean Cooper, the Wildcat Platoon and the boys on the Federal force for a splendid performance. I hope to see all of you in South Carolina later this year, and now I have a good feeling that things will continue to go in the right direction for this hobby.

Johnny Lloyd
03-18-2010, 09:44 AM
If you want an answer to "who are the campaigners" or "who is us", (as Heath would have said), I would look at Mr. Hicks registration`list. Just wanted to thank Kiev, Hicks, Sean Cooper, the Wildcat Platoon and the boys on the Federal force for a splendid performance... now I have a good feeling that things will continue to go in the right direction for this hobby.

Amen wholeheartedly, Greg. I saw many in this end of the hobby this weekend doing their best they could and was I very proud of everyone trying their best. It was rough, but I'd do it over again, sore feet, cold, mud and all. I know most who attended this weekend would do the same.

I really get tired of some in the hobby being so overly-critical of the perceived direction the hobby is going in.

From what good things and great people I saw this weekend, I think we are doing vibrantly well. That gives me great hope. :D

All the best- Johnny Lloyd:wink_smil

ajroscoe
03-18-2010, 10:43 AM
I thoroughly enjoyed the experience of Backwaters and thought that the event turned out great. I had the honor to serve as the First Sergeant of C Company, 63rd IN during the event, under Will Eichler. I've been a sergeant at events before, including Bummers and Piney Woods, but have never been a First Sergeant before, and especially with such a large company, it was an eye-opening experience. I am extremely thankful to Will Eichler and Jeremy Bevard for being as supportive and dedicated leaders as they are and giving me the opportunity. Our company had a large proportion of men who had never been to an authentic event before, probably about a third. Despite that, and us coming from Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Florida, Utah, and a few other places, I was very proud of the way my company performed, especially in the street fighting maneuvers we did by platoon on Sunday morning in the dawn fight. They fought like the veterans they portrayed, and it was a pleasure to work with such motivated and dedicated men. I cannot thank the Non-Commissioned officers enough for the work they did, they were all on the ball all weekend. The boys in B company and Skip Owens and Eric Fair did a great job all weekend. It was a great thing to see the way that the two companies interacted. There was no rivalries or pettiness between the companies, the officers and NCOs interacted and worked together like professionals. Skip did a great job as the battalion commander, and it was a pleasure to finally meet him and get to work with him.
Overall, the weekend was a success. The event organizers did an amazing job with everything, and truly made the weekend both authentic and safe. There was plenty of water, the rations were excellent, and the logistical/medical support was accessible and apparent all weekend. Obviously, there was nothing to be done about the weather, in fact I think it is what made the event so memorable. I've been through worse storms (anyone who went through that Thursday night and Friday morning at Piney Woods knows what I mean), but the persistent rain and the mud it caused made Saturday night and the march Sunday miserable. I am only 22, in good shape, and I still had trouble finishing that march on Sunday. That last long hill about 3/4 of a mile out was a test of wills to complete. I was glad to finish Sunday still at the head of my company with Will, but give fully credit to the men who gritted their teeth and finished it, even after falling out.
My only real negative for the weekend was on Saturday during the fight. The Federals were behind defensive works, with many men carrying repeating rifles, and yet the Rebels came up all the way to the works. That broke my first person and I was furious at the unscripted (and rather lame) hand-to-hand combat that resulted. There were rebels standing along our works pointing weapons point blank in the faces of my men. That included rebel officers. That is an unsat condition for their officers to allow to occur. I can only imagine the consequences if one of those rifles or pistols had discharged into the face of a man at 2 feet. All of us as leaders have a responsibility to keep our men under control and prevent the injuries that occurred in that tussle. I know that Captain Owens was cut, I had a deep muscle bruise on my arm, a rebel got a face full of musket and was bleeding, and one of my corporals had his foot stomped on and broke a toe, on top of any other injuries. Men charging defensive works properly manned and steadily defended never had much of a chance during the war, and this was a situation that realistically and reenacting wise shouldn't have happened.
Other than that, I had a great weekend. It was great to see so many men come out there and have such great impressions and give it their all. Hank did a great job as the rapist, though he was a burden, I am sorry if he wasn't fully cared for during the weekend. Thanks again to the event organizers and staff and all the men who made it out there.

Old Reb
03-18-2010, 11:38 AM
Long long ago while playing Civil War soldier boys, we captured more prisoners than we had guards to adequately guard them. We arranged a truce with the enemy and stated that we would trade our excess prisoners for food. The befuddled officer we confronted asked a deep question, "What will you do if we don't want to make the exchange." The reply from our famous Leader for Life Pigpen was, "then we will kill them all." The officer seemed a bit confused and replied with a statement that says it all about our game, "You can't do that. It is only reenacting." Thus when I think of the game we play without live rounds and with men able to get medical treatment if needed, and the fact that at the end of the day everyone gets to go home, I realize and appreciate, "It is only reenacting." As a firm believer that a good event is one where a good dose of misery is spooned out to the participants, I applaud Mr. Hicks and the others who put on this event and the weather for supplying just a taste of that misery. A soldiers life is one of misery. A good event give folks a taste of that misery. Backwaters accomplished that. Bravo!

Tejano
03-18-2010, 03:00 PM
Tom,
Unfortunately, I could not be there to comiserate with everyone. You know where I am and what I am doing. We shared our misery in January on the AR/OK line, in the Ouachita Mountains, with Choctaw Bill.

ohio volunteer
03-18-2010, 06:49 PM
First off, I had a great time at Backwaters 1865. There were several times during the weekend that seemed as if they were scripted right of the many regimentals I have read. From building breastworks only to be ordered away as soon as they were finished, to just being miserable, wet and tired while marching back on Sunday, this event gave me small taste of what the real boys went through. I especially had a great time on guard Friday night, talking to the prisoner, and harassing a certain soldier who was trying to sleep. When the soldier threatened us, it was game on from there. On the march out, I would have enjoyed another water point, but other than that, well done to the organizers!

I do though have some questions about the event, mostly over impressions. Why were the Federals the 63rd Indiana? Although the pre-event communication was great, where were the “brief narratives” the organizer promised about the unit? The 63rd is one of the few regiments that has little information available on them. If the reason the Federals were the 63rd is so they could oppose Mercer’s Brigade, why not choose the 112th Ill, since there is more information available about them? While the physicality of the event was first rate, first person was a little lacking. Who we (the federals) were as a unit was missing, we had really no identity, except for an off-handed reference to the regiment in Washington every once and a while. I admit, I had some modern conversations, and it is hard to refrain from them, but when these events are in a setting such as LBL, it is a no-brainer for it to be first-person.

BrianHicks
03-18-2010, 08:12 PM
Andrew,

Regarding the charge on the works Saturday afternoon. As it developed and built sudden momentum, as quickly as I could react to the situation, I had the Confederate Bugler call retreat.

BrianHicks
03-18-2010, 08:32 PM
On the march out, I would have enjoyed another water point,

If we'd had the ability to man pack hundreds of pounds of water down those tails, there would have been another water point. As it is, we staged adequate water for each man to consume a minimum of 12 canteens each, during the event. Pre-event hydration, along with forcing water on Saturday night, and downing another canteen pre-march out Sunday easily exceeded any ORM (Operational Risk Management) considerations for the required hydration level for the distance/terrain/duration factor of the march out.


Why were the Federals the 63rd Indiana?

Why? Because it is what we, as event organizers decided upon. Knowing that the 63d had a good veteran history, and was with Schoffield's Corps which actually placed them in the geographic area at the time of the scenario.


Although the pre-event communication was great, where were the “brief narratives” the organizer promised about the unit?

Despite our best intentions, the reality of our daily lives, and concentrating on pre-event logistics/coordinations precluded us from following through with the narratives as we had hoped to be able to provide.

This event was essentially a two man effort. On the day the event started, we where fortunate enough to have good friends contribute their time to assist with the shuttles, and placing of the water drops, but prior to that, everything else was coordinated and carried by Josh Fieldhouse and me.

coastaltrash
03-18-2010, 09:14 PM
Mr. Hicks,
The retreat was ordered well before Chad played the call, so no worries there.

Andrew,
As I was the one screaming "Halt!" on the Confederate side, with a large view of what was happening, I saw vast examples of IGNORANCE on both sides blue and gray. From my point, only Co H of 1st Battalion made it to the "works" and according to the men on the 2nd Battalion there was not a set of fortifications protecting the flank. Either way. I was in the process of going forward to start physically pulling people back when everyone started to fall back.

BrianHicks
03-18-2010, 09:29 PM
Mr. Hicks,
The retreat was ordered well before Chad played the call, so no worries there.

Andrew,
As I was the one screaming "Halt!" on the Confederate side, with a large view of what was happening, I saw vast examples of IGNORANCE on both sides blue and gray. From my point, only Co H of 1st Battalion made it to the "works" and according to the men on the 2nd Battalion there was not a set of fortifications protecting the flank. Either way. I was in the process of going forward to start physically pulling people back when everyone started to fall back.

Yes.. there was much screaming, yelling and confusion at that moment... much as in a real battle. I can't fault anyone, as it was evident that the moment swept most everyone along with it.

I am glad bayonets were not affixed. I think if I had been in command, "Fix Bayonets" would have been ordered prior to the charge!

CornFedComrade
03-18-2010, 09:43 PM
I usually don't post much and I cannot ever recall posting any type of AAR. However, after mulling over the past weekend and reading all the other "reports," I feel obligated to add my $.01 (these thoughts aren't worth $.02).

After ending the event on Sunday I was convinced that the effort I put into the weekend was not worth the return on my investment. I was among the hand full that finished with the column. Now that I have had time to recover, I recant my previous statements. I think one of the most important things that changed my mind is reading about others experiences and realizing that I had participated in something much bigger than myself. Thank you Brian, Bill, and Josh for creating an event that challenged me like no other event ever has. I learned that the body is capable of doing a lot more than your mind thinks it can. I hold my head up high with pride that I was at the event and able to complete it under my own power.

A few down points for the weekend. First person. I realize at some points it is hard to stay in first person especially when you are tired, cold, hungry, and in pain. Several folks didn't seem to try to get into character let alone stay in 1st person, for this there is no excuse. Too much gear! I know I cannot pull off the great look of Co. H, but I still tried to go as light as possible (1 painted cloth, a lightweight coverlet, and one extra pair of socks). It was March 1865 and many appeared like fresh recruits of 61-62. Remember your impression and attitude effect everyone around you.

I would like to thank everyone I encountered throughout the weekend. Each one of you is a part of a memory that will last a lifetime.

MO-Pard
03-18-2010, 11:05 PM
I'll try this again.... The last two campaign events I attended, I waited too long to share my thoughts and never did.... I tried to post on tuesday and lost everything.... The list of highlights, goods and bads......

* Per custom, we arrived a day early and dressed out. God Bless Ernie who had secured two campsites on the lakefront. It was a great evening of fellowship but we were awakened at 4:30 as the rain that had been falling about an hour, intensified and wet us good. The next morning, we lay everything out to dry and hung clothing around the fire. Though they will swear it was due to a small cardboard box I tossed on the fire, I submit the wind changed direction ahead of the incoming storms.... In any event, two men had their new jackets catch fire during the drying. How ironic for this to happen pre-event, just as the accounts in Walker's book.

* When we talked and established Company H in December, and the lean, mean veteran feel, I was asked to be the 2nd Lt. As mentioned, this company had a Cpt, 1st Lt., 2nd Lt. and a 1st Sgt, among it's 20 men. We recruited 21 (how farby I know, lol), and lost two just days before the event. Because of these losses our platoons and sections were off. I volunteered and accepted a "demotion" to cpl of 3rd section. We lost another man in 2nd section to a medical issue that evening, and Saturday morning I was again reassigned and demoted to a pvt in 3rd section. What had transpired served the basis for a running joke (by being twice demoted in 12 hours,) and the opportunity to go into first person as the malcontent or grudge-holding soldier. I was however promoted to 1st cpl sunday morning as Marty had been captured the day before...... but this promotion lasted but 30 minutes, as I was again demoted upon his return. On the good side, this flexibility allowed me to spend time in each of the sections in the company.

* Socks/shoes- About half in the company had socks, and almost none had "good" shoes.

* Does anyone know what the total distance covered was?

* First person- Had some great first person with Hunter on Friday night as we waited for the others in the section. As a result of my FP bad attitude, I came home to an email from a dear friend and brother, wondering if I was upset with him. Guess my FP interaction was spot-on.

* As Nic Clark said, "Enjoy the suck." Like Piney Woods, the consistent rain and cold temps at this event were a highlight. Throwing up shelters, sharing warmth, hot drinks, fires and drying clothing became as important as pursuing/preparing for the enemy. Since the accounts of the weather in the weeks this event was staged were pretty much the same with flooded creeks, stuck wagons and soaked clothing....it was more than appropriate. My shoes had gaping holes in the soles and uppers. My socks were wet the entire weekend. I'll be darning those yet again now as the wet wore holes in them.

* Vanguard/skirmish. The thing I love the most is Vanguard/recon and rear guard work. Even enjoyed sitting out in the rain in the field Saturday for hours watching the Federals in a long skirmish line. We weren't detected until we were actually withdrawing after a couple hours. We were covering while our comrades gathered wood, built fires and shelters. I wonder what if we would have been allowed to probe.

* Repeaters. Although they were not allowed in the guidelines and followups, their presence made no difference to me. The fact they were in the breastworks saturday, was something I was not aware of until we moved on the works. I took a hit anyway so didn't matter. I did carry a Henry at Bummers and it is a treat to carry one. My only complaint with repeaters, is similar to the point Tom made and artillery at an event........ When one carries one, there is an air of invincibility and belief you should be mowing people down which leads to frustration. Been there and you can read the same accounts from Bummers. I think one also tends to do things because of this they would not in a real situation. Sure, one has multiple rounds to launch and might drop someone with each. But in the face of vast nunmbers moving rapildy on one's position, once those rounds are gone, you have no bayonet and a much shorter "club" compared to a musket. Guess the thought being, seeing that horde approaching, repeater or not, I would have got the heck out of there and retired to higher ground/works.

* I feel bad there were some hurting for water. I wish they had asked and we asked many we passed if they were o.k. I unloaded my gear and my canteen was still 3/4's full and would have gladly shared.

* What made this event for me was this company and new, tight-knit group, (Independent Volunteers). It was TJ's idea to recruit our own company, and we wanted the most dedicated, focussed and hardest working guys. I have never been part of a company where so many guys went out and bought the book. Many went on diets to cut 10-40 lbs for that gaunt confederate look, (I was shocked after losing 10 and shopping for a suit, I was now a 38.) We needed some in civ attire, but the rest got the same jacket. We let our hair grow (i.e no modern styles) and didn't shave. The Missouri wing of the group went out no less than 6 saturdays including the last 4 to train on trails, rocks, mud, snow, rain, hills and even dreaded sunshine. They ran, they biked, etc. This all made a difference which many have already commented on. Basically, many were in Piney Woods shape which was evident when Marty needed his pipe lit and caused us to fall out at the last rest stop. We later raced each other up opposite sides of the column back to our company. Was very proud these boys could run, never seemed to tire and never quit. To quote Zombieland, "Rule #1- Cardio."

* This event was spectacular and I didn't want it to end even though the less than ideal weather. Brian, Josh, Art, etc.... you pulled off one of the best events in my experience. You were honest about the challenges and distances, and those who didn't heed them, were exposed for doubting you. Patrick, this is a hobby where if you are passionate and expect high standards of yourself and others, you will have detractors. (There are some keyboarders or others who I am sure I rub the wrong way, although those who have met and suffered with me come around.) I appreciate your stepping up and your faith in us. We would have run through a wall for you and did everything you asked. And we'll do it again for you in the future should you extend the request/invitiation.

Thank you to everyone who showed up, including Mr. Szabo. Seeing the forecast one can tell the anticipated degree of attrition, but it's good to weed those out and the ones who made the trip even if they didn't finish or straggled are the winners in my opinion.

I look forward to the next campaign event and the inviting PM's in my inbox. But most likely, I'll be attending with the Independent Volunteers.....

Best Regards

lawson
03-19-2010, 11:31 AM
Period Rush...... Saturday, as we were advancing on the works, whooping and yelling like mad savages, I paused for a moment just short of the works to survey the scene. ( partly fearing for my own safety.) As I saw Hunter run around the side of the works, and then vanish, more of our men poured over and into the makeshift fortification. As I stood there, in a confused daze, exhausted, watching my pards with their guns leveled on perspective prisoners, holding their ground, I blacked out. I couldn't move, I couldn't hear, I couldn't think. Just starred. With the chaos all around, I felt overwhelmed. I thought I would die right there, never move from that spot for eternity. Suddenly, I felt someone grab my coat and jerk me backward. As I turned I saw it was Lt. Clark of our Co. He was yelling something that i couldn't make out, and I just starred trying to focus on the shape of the words his mouth was making. Then all at once my hearing came back. With an angry gaze he shouted "FALL BACK". All of a sudden, I regained my bearing and turned running for our line through the thorns and muck.

That fifteen seconds was it for me. My apex. Made the entire trip worth it. Everytime I look at our POW image, I feel all of the energy and emotion it captures and I get transported back to the site all over again. That was magical! That is all I wanted to share. I will never have another moment in reenacting close to that, ever again!

MO-Pard
03-21-2010, 11:44 PM
Thanks Lawson.......... you took me back there in that awesome recount....

Don't know how to say it, but I am still back there........ just like Piney Woods/BGR.

c.irelan
03-22-2010, 02:54 AM
* Vanguard/skirmish. The thing I love the most is Vanguard/recon and rear guard work. Even enjoyed sitting out in the rain in the field Saturday for hours watching the Federals in a long skirmish line. We weren't detected until we were actually withdrawing after a couple hours. We were covering while our comrades gathered wood, built fires and shelters. I wonder what if we would have been allowed to probe.

Jay..... Hate to break it to ya but I knew when you all entered the field and when you left. I just didn't know who was on my front until now. You should of tried to probe you would of found that all points in ingress we covered but I would of liked the challenge.

PlainOlSmitty
03-22-2010, 09:34 AM
Well their Mr Massey, Yall sure have a whole lot of buzz round the camp bout how theirs was rebs out on a nearby hill!!!! I set right their n listened to everything i could that yall said the entire time, All i seen yall doin was cuttin down trees on ur right to add to the works.

Hunter Smith.
Liberty Rifles
Independent Volunteers.

c.irelan
03-23-2010, 09:19 AM
And I am talking about my left your right three heads counted popping up and down in a field between the line my men held and the stand of trees I believe most of you slept. If you were able to go unnoticed on the right then more power to you.

c.irelan
03-23-2010, 09:41 AM
Period rush moment:

After review and more review my mind keeps comming back to this one instance that made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Sgt Blunt was escorting Scott the runaway back to our lines to insure his passage back to collect his belongings. I desided that I would come with not knowing 100% where the new post had been set for company B. The night was as black as black could be not a single star nor the moon could be seen. The Sgt sent Scott on his way we looked down the road and waited as he disapeared into the night which was only about 6 to 8 feet away from us. Then we noticed the fires down the road burning in the trees to our left which seemed as bright as a freshly minted silver coin and then after only about 30 seconds or so we heard " Hault who goes there " Scott had been stopped by the Confederate picket line which had been placed within 15 to 20 yards of our own. The Sgt and I looked at each other eyes big and round and he said " Sir. I think we should pull the men back," I responded " Do you think ! I agree I see nothing but trouble comming from this "

The time was between 10 and 11 pm.

Mtn.Guerilla
03-23-2010, 01:08 PM
Period rush moment:

Then we noticed the fires down the road burning in the trees to our left which seemed as bright as a freshly minted silver coin and then after only about 30 seconds or so we heard " Hault who goes there " Scott had been stopped by the Confederate picket line which had been placed within 15 to 20 yards of our own. The Sgt and I looked at each other eyes big and round and he said " Sir. I think we should pull the men back," I responded " Do you think ! I agree I see nothing but trouble comming from this "

The time was between 10 and 11 pm.

Mr. Massey,if it's any concelation we didn't realize how close we were either. I didn't realize that I was basically staring at a Fed. pickett, until the deserter came that ran thru our lines. We shouted and shot, almost an instant later the same was replied from the opposite side! That was probably the most intense pickett I've pulled in a long time. This was about 11-12 o'clock

Greg Barnett
03-23-2010, 01:40 PM
Mr. Massey,if it's any concelation we didn't realize how close we were either. I didn't realize that I was basically staring at a Fed. pickett, until the deserter came that ran thru our lines. We shouted and shot, almost an instant later the same was replied from the opposite side! That was probably the most intense pickett I've pulled in a long time. This was about 11-12 o'clock

Much of the difficulty with our pickett duty that night, was due to the complete and utter darkness. When my squad was placed on our right near the road, I guess we were about 50 yards from the federal picketts. The mind can surely play tricks on one's eyes. When the pickets were changed on the federal side, the footsteps on the road seemed as if they were right upon on us. Pvt Lewis Robinson and I thought we were about to be over run. We were relieved that we did not have to fire into the darkness. It would have been hell to get out of there in a hurry!

BrisbaneReb
03-24-2010, 01:20 AM
One highlight for me was the fella' that deserted to the Feds on Saturday night. I heard yelling for someone to halt and then a gunshot. All you heard was someone hauling a** down the road, then with a flash, you saw someone appear out of the dark. When he ran past me I yelled at him then fired, I saw his gray uniform and discerned he was a deserter. That was a very cool image that will stay me.

Glad to be a part of that. Nearly half of Comp. A had a 'desertion plan' and slipped off during the battle, except me who didn't notice they were missing until our line was shifted. Deserting at night, alone, was a scary experience, especially when the picket didn't buy my BS story and had to leg it. My thanks to the Feds that took me prisoner and the other two prisoners from Comp. H - that was a good moment. My other thanks to the great guys from the South Union Guard, who let me fall in for the event and helped my stay in America.

Phil McBride
03-25-2010, 11:43 AM
I want the participants of Backwaters 65 to know that I just submitted an article about the event to the Camp Chase Gazette magazine. Hopefully it will be in their May-June issue. I included quotes from the posts of two other participants (with their permission) and some general information learned from other AAR's and info from Brian Hicks as the organizer. It's a challenge to do an event report for a broad audience, including mainstream reenactors, especially when you've been a private with only the narrow view and experiences of one rifleman. That makes the AAR's and reflections posted here a great help to creating an accurate and interesting article. My own AAR is that my feet still are tender, I'm embarrassed to have been a Sunday straggler, but still proud to have made the whole trek, and the experience was simply outstanding. We owe guys like Brian and Josh a big thanks for the huge effort they undertook to pull off the event.

Phil McBride

yankee
03-29-2010, 12:53 AM
I'm sorry fellas. I should have said this a while back.....

THANK YOU, BRIAN!!!!!!!!!
There...got that out of my system. :)

Matthew Rennier

BrianHicks
03-29-2010, 09:28 AM
I'm sorry fellas. I should have said this a while back.....

THANK YOU, BRIAN!!!!!!!!!
There...got that out of my system. :)

Matthew Rennier

Matthew,

And everyone else whom have given words of praise and gratitude for the Backwaters event, on behalf of Bill Little, Art Milbert, Jeff Preuett and especially Josh Fieldhouse and myself, Thank You!.

Josh and I where the prime movers and makers for this event. Bill Little helped initiate the effort, and was instrumental in the early stages. Unfortunately his deployment to Afghanistan took him out of the picture before he could participate in the actual event.

Art was gracious enough to step up and help us as the Federal Guide for the Event. And Jeff Preuett (not a reenactor) was the emergency evacuation driver and logistics mover during the event.

Hank Trent drafted the period maps and researched the historical background for his role as the Federal arrested for crimes against citizens, and participate in shackles for a good part of the week end.

The Tramp Brigade of Historical Interpreters where instrumental in helping us get insurance for the event.

Kiev Thomason, Jordan Roberts and Herb Coats assisted with placing water on Friday, and shuttling men to their starting points Friday night.

Josh was the link to the Rangers at the LBL site, and he created and maintained the event web site, I handled registration and the PR on the AC forums. We both solicited, ordered, procured etc. the vast amounts of rations, and then got together and bagged/boxed everything for distribution to the men in the field.

As you can see, this was a collaborative effort on the parts of many people, and we are all grateful that the end result has been so well appreciated.

Without men of the quality and in the numbers who participated in Backwaters, events, and the desire to host events like this, would not exist.

To all of you who came to Backwaters. Thank you!

Pvt Schnapps
03-29-2010, 11:36 AM
Congratulations on what sounds like an outstanding event. I'm especially impressed with the accounts of staff work, both in preparation for and during the weekend itself. Period paperwork in the rain is above and beyond the call. Fantastic work!

unclefrank
03-29-2010, 06:48 PM
Matthew,

And everyone else whom have given words of praise and gratitude for the Backwaters event, on behalf of Bill Little, Art Milbert, Jeff Preuett and especially Josh Fieldhouse and myself, Thank You!.

Josh and I where the prime movers and makers for this event. Bill Little helped initiate the effort, and was instrumental in the early stages. Unfortunately his deployment to Afghanistan took him out of the picture before he could participate in the actual event.

Art was gracious enough to step up and help us as the Federal Guide for the Event. And Jeff Preuett (not a reenactor) was the emergency evacuation driver and logistics mover during the event.

Hank Trent drafted the period maps and researched the historical background for his role as the Federal arrested for crimes against citizens, and participate in shackles for a good part of the week end.

The Tramp Brigade of Historical Interpreters where instrumental in helping us get insurance for the event.

Kiev Thomason, Jordan Roberts and Herb Coats assisted with placing water on Friday, and shuttling men to their starting points Friday night.

Josh was the link to the Rangers at the LBL site, and he created and maintained the event web site, I handled registration and the PR on the AC forums. We both solicited, ordered, procured etc. the vast amounts of rations, and then got together and bagged/boxed everything for distribution to the men in the field.

As you can see, this was a collaborative effort on the parts of many people, and we are all grateful that the end result has been so well appreciated.

Without men of the quality and in the numbers who participated in Backwaters, events, and the desire to host events like this, would not exist.

To all of you who came to Backwaters. Thank you!


My thanks to the men above!

MO-Pard
03-29-2010, 09:23 PM
I want the participants of Backwaters 65 to know that I just submitted an article about the event to the Camp Chase Gazette magazine. Hopefully it will be in their May-June issue. I included quotes from the posts of two other participants (with their permission) and some general information learned from other AAR's and info from Brian Hicks as the organizer. It's a challenge to do an event report for a broad audience, including mainstream reenactors, especially when you've been a private with only the narrow view and experiences of one rifleman. That makes the AAR's and reflections posted here a great help to creating an accurate and interesting article. My own AAR is that my feet still are tender, I'm embarrassed to have been a Sunday straggler, but still proud to have made the whole trek, and the experience was simply outstanding. We owe guys like Brian and Josh a big thanks for the huge effort they undertook to pull off the event.

Phil McBride

Phil- I always look forward to your articles. You are quite the correspondent....

Please let us know what issue.... I am not generally a subscriber but will track down this one. I know you'll pen a heck of summary.

Phil McBride
05-08-2010, 09:56 AM
Just confirming that the May-June issue of the Camp Chase Gazette is now being delivered to subscribers and it does include the article about Backwaters. I don't where else current issue may be bought or seen, but would imagine it's available at some sutlers' tents .

Phil McBride