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Rear Guard
03-20-2007, 04:35 PM
I am preparing for a school presentation and was wondering: Once in a while, I read of a Union Regiment that came from a border state or even a state that had succeeded from the Union. Can anyone give me examples of this? Especially from succeeded states in the deep south.

LHV1861
03-20-2007, 04:48 PM
There were a number of Union regiments from North Carolina. Heres a link to a list. Hope this helps. http://www.nctroops.com/union.htm




Jeff Felton
Liberty Hall Volunteers

Ross L. Lamoreaux
03-20-2007, 04:53 PM
Florida,too, had its share of Federal units made from a combination of unionists and galavanizers from Confederate units. The most well known of these is the 2d Florida Cavalry (US), of which a quick search can turn up its unit history that including shirmishing throughout Florida and a rear-guard action at the battle of Natural Bridge.

Dignann
03-20-2007, 05:00 PM
From Frederick Dyer's A Comendiumof the War of the Rebellion (1908):

Alabama
1st Regt. Cav.
1st Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
3rd Regt. Infy. A. D
4th Regt. Infy. A.D.

Arkansas
1st Regt. Cav.
2nd Regt. Cav.
3rd Regt. Cav.
4th Regt. Cav.
1st Batty. Light Arty.
1st Batty. L. A.--A. D.
1st Regt. Infy.
1st Batt'n Infy.
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Infy.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
3rd Regt. Infy.
3rd Regt. Infy. A.D.
4th Regt. Infy.
4th Regt. Infy. A.D.
5th Regt. Infy. A.D.
6th Regt. Infy. A.D

Florida
1st Regt. Cav.
2nd Regt, Cav.

Georgia
1st Batt'n Infy.

Louisiana
1st Regt. Cav.
2nd Regt. Cav.
1st Reg. Heavy Arty. A.D.
1st Batty. L. A.--A. D.
2nd Batty. L. A.--A. D.
3rd Batty. L. A.--A. D.
1st Regt. Infy.
1st Regt. New Orleans Infy.
2nd Regt. Infy.
2nd Regt. N. O. Infy.
1st Regt. Native Guard Infy.
2nd Regt. Native Guard Infy.
3rd Regt. Native Guard Infy.
4th Regt. Native Guard Infy.
5th Regt. Infy. A.D.
6th Regt. Infy. A.D.
7th Regt Infy. A.D. (60 dys.)
7th Regt. Infy. A.D.
8th Regt. Infy. A.D.
9th Regt. Infy. A.D. (Old)
9th Regt. Infy. A.D. (New)
10th Regt. Infy. A.D.
11th Regt. Infy. A.D.
12th Regt. Infy. A.D.

Mississippi
1st Regt. Cav. A.D.
1st Regt. Mounted Rifles.
1st Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
2nd Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
3rd Regt. Infy. A.D.
4th Regt. Infy. A.D.
5th Regt. Infy. A.D.
6th Regt. Infy. A.D.

North Carolina
1st Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
1st Regt. Infy.
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Infy.
2nd Regt. Mounted Infy.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
3rd Regt. Mounted Infy.
3rd Regt. Infy. A.D.

South Carolina
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
3rd Regt. Infy. A.D.
4th Regt. Infy. A.D.
5th Regt. Infy. A.D.

Tennessee
1st Regt. Cav.
1st Middle Tenn. Cav. (5-Cav.)
1st West Tenn. Cav. (6-Cav.)
2nd Regt. Cav.
2nd West. Tenn. Cav. (7-Cav.)
3rd Regt. Cav.
4th Regt. Cav.
5th East Tenn. Cav. (8-Cav.)
5th Regt. Cav.
6th Regt. Cav.
7th Regt. Cav.
8th Regt. Cav.
9th Regt. Cav.
10th Regt. Cav. <dy_34>
11th Regt. Cav.
12th Regt. Cav.
13th Regt. Cav.
14th Regt. Cav.
Bradford's Batt'n Cav.
Tenn. and Ala. Vidette Cav.
1st Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
2nd Regt. Heavy Arty. A.D.
Batty. A. Light Arty.
Batty. B. Light Arty.
Batty. C. Light Arty.
Batty. D. Light Arty.
Batty. E. Light Arty.
Batty. F. Light Arty. ,
Batty. G. Light Arty.
Batty. K. Light Arty.
Memphis Batty. L. A. A.D.
1st Regt. Infy.
1st Regt. Infy. A.D.
1st Regt. Mounted Infy.
1st Regt. E. M. Infy.
2nd Regt. Infy.
2nd Regt. Infy. A.D.
2nd Regt. Mounted Infy.
2nd Regt. E. M. Infy.
3rd Regt. Infy.
3rd Regt. Mounted Infy.
3rd Regt. E. M. Infy.
4th Regt. Infy.
4th Regt. Mounted Infy.
4th Regt. E. M. Infy.
5th Regt. Infy.
5th Regt. Mounted Infy.
6th Regt. Infy.
6th Regt. Mounted Infy.
7th Regt. Infy.
7th Regt. Mounted Infy.
8th Regt. Infy.
8th Regt. Mounted Infy.
9th Regt. Infy.
10th Regt. Infy.
Nashville Union Guards.

Texas
1st Regt. Cav.
2nd Regt. Cav.
2nd Batt'n Cav. Partizan Rangers.

Virginia
Indpt. Batt'n Loudon Rangers

Note: A.D. stands for "African Descent."


Eric

Bivouac_of_the_Dead
03-20-2007, 05:04 PM
This web site lists all Union military organizations from every state, North, South, East and West:

http://www.civilwararchive.com/regim.htm

J_V
04-11-2007, 07:43 PM
Another interesting angle for your study would be to research the counties from which many of those regiments were mustered. Some geographical patterns can be found in those Union regiments. Tennessee, Alabama, and Arkansas come to mind. From there, it would be interesting to try to drill down on reasons for Union recruitment within those regions. I know that Eastern Tennessee did not practice slavery on a wide scale (compared to Western Tennessee), and the same may be true of those counties in other Confederate states that furnished other Union regiments.

In the case of Kentucky, however, it would be interesting to see when many of those units were mustered and whether the enlistment of some units correlate to Polk's invasion of that state. Speculation all, until research is conducted. An interesting angle though, no?

Jonathan Vaughan

Dan Munson
05-01-2007, 02:07 PM
The list from Dyer's has been posted above, and that gives you a pretty good list. To the "Virginia" roster, I would add the Union troops of "West" Virginia, which after all started the war as a part of the Old Dominion and then broke away -- I understand there were a few East Tennesseans who had the same sort of thing in mind but never got around to enacting it. Perhaps the Union units from Kentucky and Missouri should also be added, because I believe the Confederates recognized their "rump" secessionist governments as the "rightful" state governments there. The fellow above who mentioned the linkage between low slave populations and Unionist feeling has a point. To that end, you might check out William Freehling's "The Road to Disunion." It contains an excellent study of the demographics -- including slave populations -- from the the end of the Revolution to the 1850s. It's a generalization, of course, but the areas of the Confederacy that tended to display the most resistance to secession were those areas, such as the mountainous regions, where slavery was not a dominant local institution. Lincoln and friends had their hands full with "Copperheads" -- and Jeff D. & Co. had to cope with more than a little "disloyalty" within Confederate borders. Look also at the book "Lincoln's Loyalists" for a good treatment on Southern Unionists (sorry - don't have the author's name ready to hand, but I can fish it out for anyone interested.)

Dan Munson
Co. K, 100th Penn'a
"The Roundhead Regiment"

brown
05-01-2007, 02:17 PM
Federal troops for southern states, as noted above, was fairly widespread. What little family I had in this country by 1860 were East Tennessee Unionists (3rd Tenn Cav and 7th Tenn M.I.).
A couple of things to note, while Tennessee's heaviest Unionist population was in the East, when one looks at a map of sentiment, Unionism seems to have followed the Tennessee River to some degree (through North Alabama and into a narrow swath of Western Tennessee.
Also, the effects of divided loyalties within a Southern state had long term implications. In Harper Lee's "To a Kill a Mockingbird" the people of the town do not trust the new teacher in town b/c she comes from North Alabama. Someone from Alabama may be able to share more of the details (and non-ACW) connections to any intrastate distrust.

aaron1stvirginia
05-16-2007, 12:03 AM
sir i don't know if this is to late or not and i wish i had seen it sooner, but i can give you a little history about the 13th tennessee cavalry. they ere mustered in johnson and carter counties in north east tennessee. they were bridge burners and also destroyed railroads. in the book i have called the history of the 13th regiment tennessee vol. cavalry USA, by captain samuel scott captain co g 13th tn tvc and samuel angel adjutant 13th tvc, it speaks of the vote in tn being over 60,000 majority votes for tn to stay in the union and east tennessee having between 30000-40000 men enlist for the federal army and the population of men between 18 and 45 was 45000. that says alot for east tennessee and it's ties to the union. it also speaks of the group riding with stoneman into sw virginia and into north carolina, south carolina and georgia. really good book about southern unionist.

Rear Guard
05-18-2007, 02:40 AM
This is great information and my students were all very surprised that loyalties did not always go the way of their respective states. It is just another example on how this war was full of irony and contradictions. Also makes me realize how the true story of the war is far more complicated than any history book can describe.

Roy Queen
12-17-2007, 03:32 PM
From what I have learned regarding the Waters side of my family, they were born in SC, and GA, and made their home in Fannin County, GA on the GA/TN state line. When war came, the family owned an iron forge along Fighting Town creek which was confiscated by the CS government. So it is not surprising that my great, great grandfather joined the 7th TN Mounted Infantry (US).

Another kinsman did not enlist in the army, but did slip across to Cleveland, TN and work for the Union Army.

Roy Queen
Co B 3rd CS Engineer Regiment

Bob Herr
12-17-2007, 09:32 PM
An equally interesting subject to study is The Southern Claims Comission which was an agency created by the Federal government in 1871 to receive claims and compensate for losses incurred by people in the South who had remained loyal to the Union. There were several thousand claims filed and reviewed. They are several pages long and contain a lot of testimony that provides interesting insight into the lives of these people. Bob Herr

maineman
12-19-2007, 05:14 PM
As far as North Alabama being more pro union, Winston Co. had the only rep. to the Secessional convention to vote against secession, and was jailed. Winston Co. then proceded to seceed from the Confederacy and became the Free State of Winston, formed a number of Federal units 1st Alabama Cavalary (U.S.) for example. To this day it remains one of the poorest counties in Alabama

Spinster
12-19-2007, 06:08 PM
And from the poor hard scrabble farmers of the hills of Winston County, we take our civilian organizational name, Winston Free-State.
http://wcgs.ala.nu/factandfiction.htm

Today, it is coal country, just as rough and tumble as it was a century and a half ago. There is an active mounted organization in our area whose sole portrayal is the men of the 1st Alabama Cavalry, with many of the members from Winston county and the surrounding area.

And to Mr. Queen--Fannin County, especially the areas around Fightingtown and Cut Cane Creeks were hotbeds of Unionist sentiment, with much of the male population going over the gap to join Federal forces, or simply fading into the higher mountains for the duration. Home Guard activities were nothing short of murder, and stories are strongly repeated these long years later. Look for Union veterans buried in the Lovin and Hothouse cemetaries, as well as soldiers of unknown name who died on the road, buried in the Van Hooke graveyard.

JimKindred
12-19-2007, 06:25 PM
Lincoln's Loyalists is a very good book on this topic - http://www.upne.com/1-55553-124-5.html Makes for some enjoyable reading.

Crockett
01-10-2008, 03:08 PM
Two regiments missed on the list from East Tennessee were the 6th and 8th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiments, U.S. I had relatives in both regiments and a relative in the 5th Tennessee Mounted Infantry, U.S. as well. North Georgia and Western North Carolina had strong Union sympathies as well.

Cincinnati Rebel
01-25-2008, 06:19 PM
While Federal history is quick to point out Federal units from Southern states, more interesting research and discussion, because it is almost never mentioned, would be focused on Confederate units or enlistments from northern states. Naturally it was very difficuly for northerners, in occupied territory, to form CS units or to reach them in order to enlist, but this was done to some extent.

A case in point would be Capt. Thorndike Brooks' Company G, 15th Tennessee Infantry, C.S.A., which was from Illinois. Somewhat different, but northern men in CS units nonetheless, is the Confederate 1st Foreign Battalion (later designated as Tucker's Confederate Regiment), raised from Federal prisoners at the CS military prison in Salisbury, North Carolina. This was not a small, isolated concept, since the return in OR Series II Vol. 8 p.254 shows 1,737 Federal POWs recruited into 3 battalions at Salisbury alone.

Further, it is interesting to note that some Federal units that would appear to be from Confederate states were, in fact, men from the North.

Examples, primarily from Dyer's Compendium:
The 1st Louisiana Cavalry (US) was in large part a reorganization of the 2nd Rhode Island Cavalry. According to the Official Records, that reorganization produced quite the mutiny among the Rhode Island troopers who were forced to take on the identity of another state.
Dyer's Compendium alludes to the 1st Tennessee Cavalry (US), organized from the 4th Tennessee Infantry (US) at Camp Dennison, Ohio, being filled out by Ohio enlistments.

Companies G, H, I, and K of the 1st Maryland Cavalry (US) were originally designated the 1st Virginia Cavalry (US), but were merged into the Maryland unit since the Virginia Federal regiment never materialized. Those men were actually from Pennsylvania.
The men who made up the 2nd West Virginia (US) were organized in Pittsburgh, but Pennslyvania did not recognize the unit, so they moved to Virginia.

There are other examples, but this should serve as a g0od starting point.

Roy Queen
03-25-2008, 10:05 PM
Mrs Lawson brings up a very good point regarding the violence in Fannin County, GA. I've done a check of cemeteries in the county, and one can determine the loyalties of a given district by the graves of the Civil War veterans in that district.

In what used to be the county seat, Morganton, there are many confederate veteran graves with the occassional union soldier hear and there. However, moving on to the Noontootla area, and by checking the old cemeteries there, that area was predominately unionist, and incidently, was also the scene of bushwhacker activities. My great great great grandfather F. Waters a veteran of the Union 7th TN Mounted Infantry, is buried next to his brother in law, a Sergeant in the 23rd Georgia Infantry Regiment.

Roy Queen

madasabagofcats
05-08-2008, 08:53 AM
There's some good reading on this subject at the beginning of 'A Southern Boy in Blue - The Memoir of Marcus Woodcock 9th Kentucky Infantry (USA)' edited by Kenneth W. Noe, University of Tennessee Press, ISBN 0-87049-921-1

Woodcock was a native of Macon County in Tennessee and there seems to have been much Union sentiment in the Macon region. On the other hand, Confederate sentiment seems to have been high in Monroe County, Kentucky, just across the State line.

It must have been hell for some of these boys returning from their enlistments on both sides of the State line.

Roy Queen
05-11-2008, 12:56 PM
I've read of accounts of former Confederate soldiers from East Tennessee being expelled from that area to more hospitable areas. Some had moved back after a few years, but many left East Tennessee for good.

Although not having to be forced to relocate, Lt. R.L. Chastain of the 11th GA Cavalry is a good example of what awaited some returning Confederate soldiers. Lt. Chastain's family during the war was one of the leading secessionist families in the North GA counties of Union and Fannin. While serving in his home area, Lt. Chastain chased bushwhackers, deserters, and unioniists, apparently doing too good of a job in this business because after the war, many of the local unionists tried to sue him for damages in the county court system.

Roy Queen

Dusty Merritt
05-11-2008, 02:38 PM
John Inscoe and Gordon McKinney's book, The Heart of Confederate Appalachia, provides some great info on Unionists in western NC, including Unionist guerrillas, volunteers in the 2nd & 3rd NC Mounted Infantry, and some Union units from TN & GA that were active in the region. A lot of Confederate deserters hid out in the mountains, some of them engaging in guerrilla war against NC Confederate troops sent to round them up. Was a civil war within a civil war.

Mtn.Guerilla
05-12-2008, 05:45 PM
I actually had a family line by the name of Kennamer out of Northern Alabama ( Jackson Co.) that formed thier own company of Scouts and Guides for the Union. Needless to say their life was extremely tough at times, for them and their families. Meanwhile on the other end of the valley near Chattanooga, I had family that seemed to constantly harrass the Federal supply lines coming into Sequatchie Valley, (ie: Conderate Guerillas hints, the avatar title) This was only discoverd thru family records I found over the past few years. There is a good book called Mountain Rebels, that we disussed awhile back, that addresses alot of these topics. Although it's extremely tough finding info on Western Federal scouts and guides.