Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

From my files

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • From my files

    Here are two of my own favorites from my files.

    I actually have three of this man, Thomas Reese, Co. A 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters, but I've posted my favorite. This image was struck around May 1862, in Falmouth, VA. In this image, off to the right, you can see the legs, cuffs, and hands of more men waiting in line for a picture! Reese may be wearing a standard issue .58 caliber cart. box with shoulder belt in conjunction with an 1862 model Sharps cart. box (which was worn on the waistbelt...notice how the belt is being pulled down and it looks like it's feeding into the straps on the back of the cart. box) OR he could just have a standard cart. box mounted on both waist and shoulder belts.

    The second image is a full-plate tintype of a guard detail from Co. F 2nd U.S. Sharpshooters in Falmouth, VA. The men are standing in front of the Ford House, a home that belonged to a family of well-to-do Southern sympathisers who left everything behind when the Federals came into town. Company F's Captain Caldwell volunteered his men to stand guard in town for nearly nine consecutive weeks as long as he was allowed to live in the Ford home and be attended by their servants who were all left behind. Caldwell died of typhiod in the house he took such a liking too and not one man from his company shed a tear for the man whose body they bore to the train depot. The Ford House is still standing today right up against a busy 4-lane highway and across the highway and down a hill along the banks of a creek stands the original red brick warehouse that the Falmouth Provost used as a jail; at least one member of Co. F was kept there as punishment for refusing to stand guard duty for a friend who agreed to take his place and then did not. The men in this image are all IDed but I cannot rattle off their names at this hour. This is, by far, the worse copy of this particular image. Inspection of a much better copy revealed that each man is sporting their company and regiment devices on their caps, and the sergeant and musician are both wearing dark green chevrons on their coats and carrying NCO swords. If you look close you'll even that half of the men on guard are wearing camp shoes! The soldier without his coat on at the right is Charles Applin, a private in Co. F, and I think he's posing as if to say, "our officers aren't around right now and look what I'M doing!"

    Brian White
    Brian White
    [URL="http://wwandcompany.com"]Wambaugh, White, & Co.[/URL]
    [URL="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wambaugh-White-Company/114587141930517"]https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wambaugh-White-Company/114587141930517[/URL]
    [email]brian@wwandcompany.com[/email]

  • #2
    Re: From my files

    Great photos!! Note that the two men who I assume must be the Sgt and musician (can't tell in this image but they have no rifles) have their boxes on the opposite side vs their comrades (blox sling over the other shoulder)...can't recall ever seeing that before - is this used as a means of identifying themselves or is this a reverse image and they forgot to move theirs to the other side?
    Last edited by DougCooper; 02-08-2004, 09:05 AM.
    Soli Deo Gloria
    Doug Cooper

    "The past is never dead. It's not even past." William Faulkner

    Please support the CWT at www.civilwar.org

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: From my files

      Originally posted by DougCooper
      Great photos!! Note that the two men who I assume must be the Sgt and musician (can't tell in this image but they have no rifles) have their boxes on the opposite side vs their comrades (blox sling over the other shoulder)...can't recall ever seeing that before - is this used as a means of identifying themselves or is this a reverse image and they forgot to move theirs to the other side?

      Doug

      They are wearing the NCO/musicians sword baldric. :wink_smil
      Robert Johnson

      "Them fellers out thar you ar goin up against, ain't none of the blue-bellied, white-livered Yanks and sassidge-eatin'forrin' hirelin's you have in Virginny that run atthe snap of a cap - they're Western fellers, an' they'll mighty quick give you a bellyful o' fightin."



      In memory of: William Garry Co.H 5th USCC KIA 10/2/64 Saltville VA.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: cool images

        Cool images Brian.....

        I hope to see you at Pickett's Mill .... I'm glad we're all doing Federal for this event. :tounge_sm
        [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

        Aaron Schwieterman
        Cincinnati

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: From my files

          Think Marinos uses that Company F photo to document the presence of canvas shoes in Federal ranks, on the wall of his shop. Are those Colt Revolving rifles?
          Fred Grogan
          Sykes' Regulars

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: From my files

            Yep, Colt-Root Revolving Rifles and .58 caliber cartridge boxes. I believe the image was taken sometime in May 1862, after the regiment recieved new green coats (they had coats made from imported English cloth which were made by Martin Brothers & Company of NYC but those were turned in for blouses in Feb. '62, then Philly Depot coats were issued in the spring) but right before getting their Sharps Rifles with new accouterments (the waist-belt mounted box).

            Here are two more photos:

            Another of Thomas Reese, taken sometime between mid-March and early June, 1863. I thought I had the time pinned down since the U.S.S.S. turned in their coats and drew blouses on June 6th, but then I ran across diary entries stating that some men carried both coat AND blouse during the Chancellorsville Campaign. So it could be that Reese was photographed after being issued his III Corps 3rd Div. badge in March, or after C-ville but before departing on June 11th for the 1st Division of the III Corps! Nevertheless, this is a great image showing him sporting what I THINK is a crushed-down Army hat (with cord!), lined blouse with rubber buttons, cravat, dark green pants, and a civilian belt around his waist (barely visible). Shaved head, smug look, just awesome.

            Late 1861 or early 1862 image of a mess from Co. B, 1st U.S.S.S. called "The Bummers." After the war this image was published in the regimental history with a short song about how these four men could forage better any any one of Sherman's bummers. Left to right they are James Byers, John White, Fred Meyers, and Matt Morgan. It appears that Morgan is wearing a frock and White is wearing a seamless gray felt overcoat on top of a civilian vest, issue shirt, and issue trousers. The overcoat is bound with either dark green or red tape (both variations were issued) and the buttons are hard rubber; the cape, which could be removed by means of large hooks and eyes, is removed. White and Meyers are wearing seamless caps of contrasting quality or condition.

            Brian White

            PS-Mods, before I get carried away, these are the last images I'm posting. Remove if necessary.
            Brian White
            [URL="http://wwandcompany.com"]Wambaugh, White, & Co.[/URL]
            [URL="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wambaugh-White-Company/114587141930517"]https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wambaugh-White-Company/114587141930517[/URL]
            [email]brian@wwandcompany.com[/email]

            Comment

            Working...
            X