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What is going on in this pic?!

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  • #16
    Re: What is going on in this pic?!

    So could this be just some random group shot inside some East coast fort?
    Brett Asselin
    Rebel Death Squad
    Lee's Miserables
    Liberty Rifles
    SC Society

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    • #17
      Re: What is going on in this pic?!

      Perhaps the DC area? Norfolk, VA after occupation? Either one might account for the mix of uniforms and looks.
      Michael Comer
      one of the moderator guys

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      • #18
        Re: What is going on in this pic?!

        The 3rd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery was photographed at Fort Monroe, VA on parade in that full-dress-and-knapsack state. Could this be the location?
        Marc A. Hermann
        Liberty Rifles.
        MOLLUS, New York Commandery.
        Oliver Tilden Camp No 26, SUVCW.


        In honor of Sgt. William H. Forrest, Co. K, 114th PA Vol. Infantry. Pvt. Emanuel Hermann, 45th PA Militia. Lt. George W. Hopkins & Capt. William K. Hopkins, Co. E, 7th PA Reserves. Pvt. Joseph A. Weckerly, 72nd PA Vol. Infantry (WIA June 29, 1862, d. March 23, 1866.) Pvt. Thomas Will, 21st PA Vol. Cavalry (WIA June 18, 1864, d. July 31, 1864.)

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        • #19
          Re: What is going on in this pic?!

          Yes sir, I have searched older threads to no avail but if my memory serves me, this image has been
          up for discussion.
          Never the less the LOC has this image titled "Group Portrait of Unidentified New York State Artillery Unit".http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collecti...em/2006679213/

          As a side note to this image, a look at New York State Artillery Units has the 1st Regiment Marine Artillery_Howard's Artillery;Naval Brigade, for service on gunboats.
          I would ask.., as a New York State unit would they be under Army Command and have nothing to do with the
          U.S.Marine Corps?
          Here is the link and footnotes, http://www.civilwarindex.com/armyny/...artillery.html and another link, http://dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reg...ArtMarMain.htm.
          Last edited by yeoman; 04-17-2011, 12:32 PM. Reason: link and footnote
          Mel Hadden, Husband to Julia Marie, Maternal Great Granddaughter of
          Eben Lowder, Corporal, Co. H 14th Regiment N.C. Troops (4th Regiment N.C. Volunteers, Co. H, The Stanly Marksmen) Mustered in May 5, 1861, captured April 9, 1865.
          Paternal Great Granddaughter of James T. Martin, Private, Co. I, 6th North Carolina Infantry Regiment Senior Reserves, (76th Regiment N.C. Troops)

          "Aeterna Numiniet Patriae Asto"

          CWPT
          www.civilwar.org.

          "We got rules here!"

          The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

          Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the most part contributations by Union and Confederate officers

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          • #20
            Re: What is going on in this pic?!

            While it would be common to have sailors carry no arms in a parade situation, it would be decidely uncommon to have them wearing any other hat besides the flat hat (as a number of these men are). Also, sailors ashore with a boat howitzer, especially in the east, would be armed with cutlass or bowie bayonet and pistol - Dahlgren was quite insistent on that. Also, sailors would not be wearing sky blue trousers for any reason. Regulations were quite specific on hats and pants and the like. You may notice that while some men with any type of hat have dark pants, all that have a flat hat have dark pants. Also, monkey jackets would usually have more buttons than those shown, though the deisgn was variable.

            Steve Hesson might know, being one of the foremost experts on naval uniforms.
            [COLOR=Blue][SIZE=4][FONT=Verdana]Bob Dispenza[/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR]
            [COLOR=Navy]US Naval Landing Party ([url]www.usnlp.org)[/url][/COLOR]
            [COLOR=SeaGreen]Navy and Marine Living History Association ([url]www.navyandmarine.org)[/url][/COLOR]

            "The publick give credit for feat of arms, but the courage which is required for them, cannot compare with that which is needed to bear patiently, not only the thousand annoyances but the total absence of everything that makes life pleasant and even worth living." - Lt. Percival Drayton, on naval blockade duty.

            "We have drawn the Spencer Repeating Rifle. It is a 7 shooter, & a beautiful little gun. They are charged to us at $30.00. 15 of which we have to pay."
            William Clark Allen, Company K, 72nd Indiana Volunteers, May 17, 1863

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            • #21
              Re: What is going on in this pic?!

              Like bob said, monkey jackets typically have more buttons, mine has twenty, heres a link to steve hessons version of the monkey jacket...mine doesnt button nearly that far up, but as stated in the previous post there were variations

              http://www.hesson-clothiers.com/csmonkey3.jpg
              Rob Riley

              1st NC Sharpshooter Btn
              CSS Chicora Landing party
              15th NJ Infantry

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              • #22
                Re: What is going on in this pic?!

                This WAS discussed before and here is the previous link: http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/...hlight=gunboat
                According to the citation this was the crew of the US Gunboat "General Foster" photographed ashore at Point of Rocks, VA, on the Appomattox. That explains the combined arms.These fellows would have been supporting Butler's Army of the James while he was bottled up at Bermuda Hundred. Butler's famous signal tower was at this Point of Rocks.
                Bob Williams
                26th North Carolina Troops
                Blogsite: http://26nc.org/blog/

                As [one of our cavalry] passed by, the general halted him and inquired "what part of the army he belonged to." "I don't belong to the army, I belong to the cavalry." "That's a fact," says [the general], "you can pass on." Silas Grisamore, 18th Louisiana

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                • #23
                  I think these men could be a company from the 1st New York marine artillery or of Segebarth’s battalion of marine artillery. Nether of which were actually marines but army soldiers trained for duty on ships such as gunboats and what not. As for the Mississippi marine brigade, if I remember correctly the only difference between the regulation uniform and their’s is the cap which I only have a vague discription of. If anyone has information on the uniform please feel free to share.
                  Dan Kohli

                  4th U.S. Artillery, Battery A WI.

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