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  • Tool Kit

    Anyone have an Idea of what kind of tools I would need to build a kit for repairing most major makes of muskets and carbines in the field? (look in the wanted to buy section of this forum) I am looking to provide a service to my pards, not for profit.. (charge what I paid for the part) just looking to keep the weekend rolling. Many times I am at an event when someone in my unit or at the event loses a part for there weapon, or is in need of a replacement part. I am looking for parts and tools to build a repair kit, to keep on hand in the field.

    Any suggestions for a proper tool kit would be apprecieated, as well as any old or spare parts anyone would like to part with.. Moderator feel free to move this if this is not the proper place for this discussion....;)

  • #2
    Re: Tool Kit

    Mike, here's another good place to ask this question: www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fusionbb/index.php

    RJ's gonna tan your hide for stealing his tagline. :D
    Yr Most Ob't Serv't,

    Guy 'Frenchie' LaFrance

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    • #3
      Re: Tool Kit

      A full compliment of tools, such as was issued to the Sgts, should allow you to dis-assemble the weapon all the way down to the last screw, spring, etc. Items such as replacement seers, mainsprings and cones, etc would be useful if you really wanted to get deep into the repair business, but some of these would takes it far beyond what would normally be found in the field. Although anachronistic, a (and I don't know what they are called) but the device which is used to extract rammers which have become stuck in the barrel, would be useful as well.
      Last edited by BrianHicks; 07-18-2007, 01:03 PM.
      Brian Hicks
      Widows' Sons Mess

      Known lately to associate with the WIG and the Armory Guards

      "He's a good enough fellow... but I fear he may be another Alcibiades."

      ďEvery man ever got a statue made of him was one kinda sumbitch or another. It ainít about you. Itís about what THEY need.ĒCAPTAIN MALCOLM REYNOLDS

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      • #4
        Re: Tool Kit

        Originally posted by BrianHicks View Post
        Although anachronistic, a (and I don't know what they are called) but the device which is used to extract rammers which have become stuck in the barrel, would be useful as well.
        I purchased a ramrod puller from Jas. Townsend (http://jas-townsend.com/product_info...roducts_id=176) and can tell you that it's worth every penny. If it was worth $1.00 each time I've used it (or had a pard use it) in the past 2 years of owning it, it would have more than paid for itself . . . perhaps this is a sign I'm hanging with the wrong pards? :-D

        Seriously, it's a great item, has good sized handles, and is designed in such a way that one could even use a stratigically placed tree crotch if one had to use it by oneself.

        Bill Kane

        P.S. I'm highly interested in specific items that people suggest in this thread also.
        Last edited by wmkane; 07-18-2007, 08:35 AM. Reason: adding post script
        Bill Kane
        Tar Heel Mess
        [url]http://www.tarheelmess.org[/url]

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        • #5
          Re: Tool Kit

          It is unfortunate how often I have seen individuals whom some how get their ramrods stuck in the barrel. Now.. not meaning to disperage any of those folks to whom this has happened, but it most often seems to occur due to some slight error in the way in which the weapon is cleaned.

          My observations have been that this problem has most often occurred due to one of two reasons (ands sometimes from a combination of both).

          1. Failing to remove the cone before putting a patch (or any other cleaning implement) down the barrel.

          2. Rapping the patch around the bulb end of a Springfield ramrod, or threading it through the tool slot on an Enfield ramrod.

          If you remove the cone before putting a patch down the barrel, you're allowing for the air between your patch and the bottom of the barrel to be pushed out were the cone had been. If this isn't done, sometimes the carbon will seal the fire hole in the cone (especially after water has been in and out of the barrel, then you get the gummy wet carbon) which can create a vacuum if the patch fits tight in the barrel as your pushing it in.

          Rapping the around the bulb end of the rammer, or threading it through the tool slot of the Enfield rammer will often make the fit too darn tight, which causes the ram rod to get stuck in the barrel.

          Each man should have been issued a worm with his weapon (the little corkscrew looking attachment). The better way of punching the bore, is to simply stuff the patch into the top end of the barrel, and with the worm threaded onto the end of the ram rod, push the patch down to the bottom of the barrel, give the ram rod a twist so that the worm gets hold of the patch, and then you pull it back out.

          Using these recommended methods will greatly reduce the likelihood of a ram rod getting stuck in the barrel.
          Brian Hicks
          Widows' Sons Mess

          Known lately to associate with the WIG and the Armory Guards

          "He's a good enough fellow... but I fear he may be another Alcibiades."

          ďEvery man ever got a statue made of him was one kinda sumbitch or another. It ainít about you. Itís about what THEY need.ĒCAPTAIN MALCOLM REYNOLDS

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          • #6
            Re: Tool Kit

            Hallo!

            "Repairing" IMHO goes a little too far both in terms of tools and in most lads' gperiod gunsmithing knowleldge and skills and abiity to use them in a field setting...

            However.... IMHO, the most common "event" problems I have experienced and dealt with over the years are, in order of frequency:

            1. Stuck ramrods most always due to the use of modern cleaning jags and over sized cleaning patches combined with modern range cleaning techniques of a dry bore and a damp patch.

            2. "Failure to fire" caused by fouled cones (niples) from inadequate cleaning and/or the use of modern undersized "N-SSA type" competition cones (nipples) with too small a hole that cokes closed in sustained reenacting/living history use.

            3. Spring breakage. Typically, the stamped metal sear spring. But I have seen the cast mainsprings crack three or four times in the past few decades.

            4. Lock part failure. Due to random Italian Quality Control, internal lock parts are such as sears, bridles, and particularly tumbler notches, are soft or too hard and fail.

            5. Loose Nut Behind the Trigger Problems. A variety here ranging from rusted and fused lock internals caused by letting the gun out in the rain make it "authentic," to all manner of fouling problems caused by no cleaning or inadequate cleaning filling the flash channel or breech end with coke or sludge or oil, etc., etc., or lost patch blocking the flash channel, or....

            During the Civil War, it could be argued that during a battle if one's weapon failed, there were plenty lying on the ground in a few minutes to replace it with. Today we are more limited.

            However, having the issue "appendages" such as pick, wiper, ball screw, and combo-tool/wrench/screwdriver can get a lad out of most field problems if a weapon is properly maintained going in and "there" ....

            IMHO, the ability to clean a badly fouled weapon, to replace a coked fused "N-SSA" cone (nipple) and the ability to replace a broken spring will keep all but the worst-case scenarios and examples of abuse and neglect "in action." A small kit or box "back in the parking lot" can keep a pard in the game with the common ailments....

            Others' mileage will vary...

            Curt
            Curt Schmidt
            In gleichem Schritt und Tritt, Curt Schmidt

            -Hard and sharp as flint...secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster.
            -Haplogroup R1b M343 (Subclade R1b1a2 M269)
            -Pointless Folksy Wisdom Mess, Oblio Lodge #1
            -Vastly Ignorant
            -Often incorrect, technically, historically, factually.

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            • #7
              Re: Tool Kit

              The only other tool I've every used in the field is a sight wrench. Somehow someone always seems to be working one of those things loose.

              Luckly they've come to me BEFORE it falls off.
              Bob Sandusky
              Co C 125th NYSVI
              Esperance, NY

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              • #8
                Re: Tool Kit

                Originally posted by mrgrzeskowiak View Post
                Any suggestions for a proper tool kit would be apprecieated, as well as any old or spare parts anyone would like to part with.
                Mike,

                The unasked question is for you to inventory your own implement pouch, and bounce that against what is supposed to be in that often ignored, but quite valuable resource. Those little items are worth their weight in gold when you need them.

                (Bill, I have fond memories of the 26th NCT back in the Jeff Stepp days.)
                [B]Charles Heath[/B]
                [EMAIL="heath9999@aol.com"]heath9999@aol.com[/EMAIL]

                [URL="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Spanglers_Spring_Living_History/"]12 - 14 Jun 09 Hoosiers at Gettysburg[/URL]

                [EMAIL="heath9999@aol.com"]17-19 Jul 09 Mumford/GCV Carpe Eventum [/EMAIL]

                [EMAIL="beatlefans1@verizon.net"]31 Jul - 2 Aug 09 Texans at Gettysburg [/EMAIL]

                [EMAIL="JDO@npmhu.org"] 11-13 Sep 09 Fortress Monroe [/EMAIL]

                [URL="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Elmira_Death_March/?yguid=25647636"]2-4 Oct 09 Death March XI - Corduroy[/URL]

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