Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Looking to put on an event

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Andrew Jarvi
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    I know of a fellow that is looking for a mess in the New England area. Anyone that would like to work with this fellow please email me at andrewjarvi@alltel.net. It would be much appreciated being I can't do much from Ohio.

    Respectfully,
    Andrew Jarvi

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    The 28th Mass., Co. K is putting on its second living history at the Old Manse in Concord, MA from Jul 31 - Aug 1. The Old Manse is a historic home that overlooks the North Bridge and was home to such people as Hawthorne and Emerson. We worked very well with the museum's folks last year to provide a quality living history event and hope to do even better this year.
    For those who don't know us, we are the group that split off from the other 28th Mass. several years ago to redirect our impression. Like many other former mainstreamers, we just wanted to stretch our wings and try something new. We have fielded with both the Columbia Rifles and the Potomac Legion at numerous events including the Civil War Museum, Antietam, and the Gettysburg living history last year at the Penn. monument. Our wives (who are far more hardcore than we are) are Columbia's Daughters. I don't think that I am speaking out of turn when I say that we have developed what I consider a good reputation. We aren't perfect by any means, but we always try to raise the bar.

    Webpage for Old Manse http://www.concord.org/town/manse/old_manse.html .


    YMOS,
    Capt.Todd Bryda
    TBryda@28thmass.com
    www.28thmass.com
    Last edited by dusty27; 06-24-2004, 07:24 AM. Reason: No recruiting in this folder.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    I've personally never been to New England. Free beer? Even at a farb event! You guys should put your heads together and put one on. Maybe just maybe you can turn some of them! Bully, Cpl Dan Morgan 10thVA(IVR)

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Craig
    replied
    New England opportunities

    Matt, et al,

    As has already been noted there isn't much in the way of "high quality" events in New England. There are however loads of great sites (I know of an outstanding one in VT, and a real good one in MA) and a seemingly growing list of campaigners up here. Let's follow Tripp's advice and get something going!

    On a realted note there is a brewing "campaigner adjunct" opportunity coming up. The Borderland event (July 22-24) in Easton, MA is a solidly mainstream event, but it is held on a great piece of property. Some of my pards are getting together at the event to do stuff like picket duty, patrols etc. Again, it will be part of a "streamer" event but it will be a chance to do some period stuff with a good group of local like-minded guys without driving 5-plus hours. If you want more info feel free to email me at: firstmasscav@att.net

    Take care,
    Tom Craig
    Columbia Rifles

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Rover
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    How does one start an event?

    Practice Binge Drinking for 3 months prior to announcing it, and then enroll in AAA classes to start the day after the event.

    Pards,

    Leave a comment:


  • billwatson
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    Sounds like Pierre King and the 27th Connecticut have a viable site for a public high-quality living history.

    What helps tremendously in putting these things on is a real partnership with some kind of venue with an interest in history, like the fort. But you really need to consider all that "partnership" means. In our case, it means both the living historians and the site get something of value from the activity. That might seem simple -- both a historic site being actively interpreted and Civil War living historians would seem to have a wide common ground of interpreting history. But it can go awry.
    If a site sees itself as the kind of place that interprets history to three or four people at a time, while its staff is involved primarily in research, there could be lukewarm interest in a Civil War weekend that "threatens" to bring in hundreds of people to trample the flower beds, scratch the floors, poke into places they aren't supposed to go and otherwise upset the calm and tranquility.
    If a site sees itself primarily as a tourism draw and isn't particularly interested in the precision of its historic interpretation (Oh, I don't know, want an example: The Wax Museum in Gettysburg?) then it might find itself not interested in hosting a living history group that frets about whether the unit they're depicting had bulls eye or smoothside canteens in 1863.
    If a site is serious about history and eager to interpret it to masses of people, it may have reservations about turning the job over, even for a weekend, to reenactors. Many reenactors have no objection to accurate history, but do not feel compelled to depict it themselves. And some have bad habits -- swinish partying, re-interpreting history to fit their feelings rather than the facts, etc. I know of places where reenactors are no longer welcome because of damage to artifacts caused by after-hours partying. I know of other places where reenactors are not welcome because they didn't know their history.
    You also get into a competition thing sometimes with those who run a site permanently, who may know a lot about the site, and who suddenly find themselves confronted with people who have incredibly deep knowledge about one slice of stuff, to the extent that they can go through the museum displays and say "Nope, that's a bayonet for a Lorenz, that unit never had them, what's it doing with that musket?" It's that bottom rail on top thing and it can upset people. But you'll have to simply be aware of it, because they won't say why they suddenly think maybe the whole thing needs to be thought through again, and do you have this much insurance, and wouldn't 2011 be better?
    So the very first step in putting on something like this, unless you have access to a farm or something where you can do your own thing and invite the public, is to find an appropriate site with an agenda that will complement yours. What you do and what they do can go together, on a limited journey. There's a common destination.
    Then, they will want someone in charge. They will want someone who can deal with the site and speak for the living history folks. They don't want to deal with a mob. But whoever stands up to be counted for THAT job then runs the danger of being accused of wanting to be The Great I Am by all the other living historians who didn't really want the aggravation of the post, but don't want anyone else to look like they have any clout either.
    Then they will want a program, so that they can tell the public "At thusly and such you will be able to see this, this and this at these three locations on our site." That's where you really get down to what's in it for you guys and what's in it for the site.

    That may all sound daunting, but it really isn't, it's McDowell, Fort Delaware, Antietam NPS last fall and any other number of events where history-heavy living historians got to do their thing.

    There's more. A partnership needn't be solely event-based. It's entirely possible that a site where you do a public interaction thing that helps the site would also make itself available at another time (like off season for them) for you to do your own learning workshops -- including full immersion experiences so you can prepare yourself to better interpret history by trying it on for size for a weekend.

    This is by no means the only way to go. But something like this, where folks have carefully identified the opportunities and tried to stay within the areas that a partnership benefits both partners, does work. Like much that we do, it simply requires folks to stay focused on the main mission and not get bogged down in personalities and irrelevant agendas. Job One is to identify an opportunity, Job Two is to make it happen.

    Hope that helps a bit.
    Last edited by billwatson; 06-18-2004, 08:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • trippcor
    replied
    Steps to a successful event

    Here is the formula we used for Pickett's Mill and it worked well.

    This assumes,as your previous post indicate, you already have a site and a general idea of what you want to protray.

    First do the research. Find out what units were there, what they did, what they ate and so forth. No detail is to small. You may find some great little tidbits that you could incorporate into your event.

    Next decide what type of event you want to do. Will this be a Living History? Will it be 3rd or 1st person? Immersive, Semi-Immersive or not at all?

    Next setup guidelines for the event and registration that covers all those that may attend Military & Civilian. As part of creating your guidelines you also need to set up your general command structure. This gives people points of contact if they have questions. We have found down south individual registration works best due to all the small messes and independant folks that like to come to events. It is a good idea to post this information to the web for folks to see. a website also helps draw interest from other area of the country and makes folks think you are serious about the event.

    Next plan your event schedule. It does not have to include every little detail just an overall outline of things that will happen.

    Then decide if your event will have some additional purpose such as raising money to help the Fort on a specific project. We had two for Pickett's Mill, build a split rail fence around one of the fields and to help finish a period cabin. We raised a good bit of money and the effort helped draw interest to our event.

    Lastly do a smaller version of what your are planning as a run through. It will give you a chance to see what works and what doesn't. It will also help earn you some credits as an event coordinator.

    I hope that helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • JimConley
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    Why don't y'all do some research, set guidelines, and draft an event for your area? Just because you don't have epic battle history in New England doesn't mean that you must drive hours on end to attend a good event. I suggest you begin small. Get some boys together and set up something like a drill or living history event (or, hell, combo). Get some good info on a New England regiment and portray them for a weekend as they were mustering and organizing for the call to campaign. Just a suggestion, and I'm sure you have some options.

    Leave a comment:


  • riverratmess
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    So if were interested in working something out, how does one go about organizing an event? I'd be our first.

    Much thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Curtis
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    I'm in Stoughton, MA. If this becomes a reality, I'll be there.

    Also, if there's any way I can help(being 16 and jobless), let me know.


    Chris Curtis

    Leave a comment:


  • poncho
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    Greetings all!
    My unit is based in Connecticut and for the past 2 seasons we have been putting on a garrison impression at a 100% restored 3rd system fort built in 1852. The location and setting is absolutely amazing! especially when manned with accurate reenactors, it is a total time warp. We have been toying with the idea of getting other quality units in there so that we could garrison the fort with a full size company, complete staff and all. Our chairman lobbied for years so that we have exclusive rights to put on events at this state park. It really has potential to be a really excellent authentic event. What's really unique is the fact that it's an authentic location. We won't be reenacting a battle of so and so that originally occurred in Virginia. This location was actually garrisoned by a CW unit of regulars during the war. Any interested parties contact me via e-mail and perhaps we can organize something for next year, barring approval of the park officials and our unit board. This could really be great!

    Leave a comment:


  • pvt_dirty
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    howdy pard
    Im in NC right now in the 82nd but live in VT and i always wanted to set up a farb free event. Ill be out in june of 2005 we should plan something for next summer. Im all for it if you are really interested let me now and we can talk and get more people in to get this started. Pick a site to hold the event
    you can email me at
    pvt_dirty@yahoo.com
    or my cell is 910 286 6847 - or 910 904 1990
    your pard
    tyler Goodrich

    Leave a comment:


  • Csayankee
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    Being that I went to Hign School in Maine.. But live in Kentucky I would attend give me more reasons to visit. Bu I can see the put of wanting more authentic events in New England. There use to be one in the town I lived in and I use to think that they were top notch until I started in this hobby ion Kentucky.

    Thanks
    Daniel MacInnis

    Leave a comment:


  • billwatson
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    I'll come park cars for you. New England isn't that far away.

    Leave a comment:


  • trippcor
    replied
    Re: Looking to put on an event

    Sounds like several of you are interested. So why don't y'all get together an built the event you want. That is the only way it will happen. You can't always expect others to do it for you.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X