Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rmhisteach
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Awesome work ! Mike and Jeremy you both did a great job on AAR's

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Comer
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    I respectfully submit my report concerning the recent activity near Guntown, Mississippi. The men of Co. K, 7th Kentucky Mounted Infantry did a splendid job following their orders to patrol, report and gather prisoners in the aftermath of our great victory at Brice's Crossroads.

    We were partially mounted since we have suffered a shortage of good horseflesh on this campaign. My command had approximately 50% mounted and the rest operating as regular infantry as we once did. Since the men had served as infantry previously they were well seasoned as such and were able to operate successfully against the enemy either mounted or on foot.

    We established our camp where a surgeon had set up his aid station. He was not happy with us being at what he called a neutral spot, but it was the only well cleared area nearby that we could establish ourselves at. We began to patrol our assigned area on Saturday Sept. 6. It was a very rough area and offered the enemy many places to hide. My company immediately ran into a small group of Federals in skirmish formation and we proceeded to move to contact. After a spirited fight, the enemy was forced from the field, falling back through some willow thickets. We pursued but became too disorganized due to the terrain and stopped to reorganize and began to systematically ferret them out of their holes. It was a difficult job due to the makeup of the land which favored small groups of men who did not wish to be caught. We did see a few Federals on Sunday in the distance that we had missed but they were heading toward the area that Company H had been assigned and we did not bother to pursue; the men being quite tired from the strenous efforts they had made. We encountered no civilians in the area with the exception of a single pastor who offered divine services to the men on Sunday. The absence of local inhabitants made it more difficult to gather intelligence about where the enemy might be.

    The enemy showed fight and moved upon our forces several time in attempts to fight their way out of the trap that was closing in. We were successful in killing several of the enemy and capturing several through the course of our efforts but were thrown into confusion by one attack on our left where laxity led the men there to not throw out proper guards. Those responsible have been put on report. Our loss was one killed and two wounded - one mortally most likely. Through constant patrols and skirmish work we were able to capture 6 of the enemy including one officer. They were all from the 113th Illinois and were tired and hungry. One man only had a few hard crackers in his haversack. I do not know if that is evidence that their entire force is in such bad shape or not. My men feasted quite well on captured stores acquired at Brice's Crossroads and we were in fine fetter and up for the work at hand. We finished our assignment and escorted our prisoners to brigade headquarters to turn them over to their charge.

    I wish to single out Corporal Fleming who led several patrols with great enthusiasm and succeeding in capturing two Federal soldiers and dispatching another. He showed energy and valor in pursuit of his orders.

    Co. K showed itself to be unit that can be relied upon by the general to accomplish any and all missions assigned it.

    I remain humbly your obedient servant
    Michael Comer,
    Lieutenant Commanding

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeremy Bevard
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    September 1884

    Since my experiences during the war to put down the rebellion I have told a few stories to interested parties and family. Certain memories have been kept to myself because of the sadness and difficulty they bring me. Some of these involve my capture in 1864 and subsequent stay in Libby Prison for just short of a year. After over twenty years since the start of those events the time has come to write down my recollections while I still have them.

    At the battle of Brices Cross Roads in Mississippi I was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 113th Illinois. During this failed attack which we were expected to carry out on empty stomachs and exhausted bodies we were scattered. I believe about 20% of our brave regiment became captives to suffer in various Confederate prisons with many spending time in the infamous Andersonville.

    Myself and nine other men were together trying to find our way through the terrain of Mississippi to the rest of the Army and hopefully what was left of the Regiment. The next morning after the main fighting we were chased across a large field losing one man. The rest making an escape by heading deep into the wildness of a swampy area. After staying low for some time we ventured on our way again. A couple men foraged some vegetables from a farm.

    Unfortunately, soon as they returned we saw horsemen coming down the road. We hid the food and ran into some tickets. After they moved on we came across a 113th Illinois man that had lost all his equipment, his coat and his rifle, carrying just a large stick as a club. This gave us all a laugh in a tough time. We returned to get the hidden food and moved into an area to try and rest and eat. About an hour later we heard shots fired at a detail that was sent for water. They came at us hard this time and we scattered. Myself and two others found our way into some pines and laid down. After an hour of things being quiet we headed back out not knowing what happened to the others.

    Thankfully we found the man with the club first and then three more. Two had been captured it seemed. The other group of three said they came across a small group of Rebs who were too comfortable in their recent victory to not put a guard on their left while resting. We took this opportunity to take them by surprise, which we did. We captured several rebel horseman and had some others pinned. Sadly the attack leads to one of their men getting shot and they had two prisoners, which one was killed during the attack. We grabbed the other man and ran into the wilderness to hopefully not be seen again.

    After some travelling we found a parson on a wagon that sold us some cabbage and ham for some confederate scrip one man had on him. I didn’t ask where he picked it up. We found a place that proved to be safe for the night to eat our meal. Early in the morning I had the men on the road early to try and make it back to the Federal lines. After sometime we came to a large field with a road running along it and we found another rebel outpost. It seemed these small parties were all over the area rounding up the scattered union men in the area. How sad for such brave men who’s only fault was following the orders they were given to be hunted like small game in the thickets by the bands of hunters. I decided that this road lead to home for and this band stood in our way. I was done running so I gave the order to attack with the hope of pushing them from our way. The small attack started in our favor but did not end in a victory for us. Myself and a private became cutoff on the left of our meager skirmish line having several rebels advancing on us. The rest made a retreat but two were quickly caught up with and brought in.

    The officer in command of this group of rebel horseman treated us with respect. He provided us with a couple slices of pork and some “pea bread” crackers to eat. He seemed to be a good man who had been hardened by war but was also tired of it. While he seemed ready to go home like so many of us, not so much he was willing to lay his arms down with any compromise to his beliefs.

    The guards showed the Confederacy was on its last legs. They were a mix of boys to young to shave and men with white beards. As I was being asked questions by all of them I felt this observation was a sad one but almost brought me joy in a depressing moment that I should not be in a prison long with those conditions in their ranks. With each change of guard the same questions were asked. I finally stopped responding all together and just say in silence accepting my fate.

    Not long after more useless bloodshed took place. Once of my men saw an opportunity as a young guard became relaxed with his pistol and the other guard was looking the other way. He dove and tackled the one with the pistol and another prisoner ran for the trees. The commotion had the second guard spin around and fire killing the man going for the trees. The guard who was tackled won that affair as well. It all took place in a blink of an eye and ended with two more loyal union men not making it home except for their spirit.

    That evening those of us left were on our feet being marched to the rails to endure a level of suffering and deprivation we could not fathom before having to endure it.

    Leave a comment:


  • lambrew
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Thank you to Rod and the gang for putting this event together. I got to see what it was like to be outnumbered and on the run constantly. Hounded on all sides, doing our level best not to get caught. Sunday will be a highlight in my reenacting career. Just the four of us on the move for the better part of eight hours. We would lay low for a spell, then spot a confederate patrol and get up and move elsewhere. Feeling pressured all day, and having no real way to lash out at our tormentors was a new experience. I have often read about the same, but never before had a chance to experience this level of intensity. We had our moments of military glory on Saturday, but being a fugitive on Sunday was a thrill. Again thanks to everyone who came out. I got to make some new friends, and see some old ones. "I had fun, how about you?"

    Leave a comment:


  • DBVaughn
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Let me thank Rod Miller for a great time this weekend. Not just for the great time of moving through tall grass and the willow thicket, getting lost in a seemingly small space, guarding prisoners, being out on picket in dark or light, getting attacked at odd hours and a wonderful reenacting experience, but for the endless hours involved in organization and site preparation. I also want to thank you gents that came in from all parts-- Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Illinois to demonstrate what a quality Civil War experience can be for the people of my home town. Thanks as well to our commanders Mike Comer and Jeremy Brevard for making it a great time for those under your command. Thanks again to you all for coming and to Rod for putting it all together. I hope more of you will take advantage and join us next year in Bourbonnais.
    Mark Hess
    Last edited by DBVaughn; 09-08-2014, 11:57 AM. Reason: left out Mr. Comer's home state

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeremy Bevard
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Less then two weeks till Routed at Guntown. Where is your registration?
    https://sites.google.com/site/routedatguntown/

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeremy Bevard
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Summer has flown by! Routed at Guntown on Sept 6-7 is right around the corner. Only a month to go so time to get that registration sent in. I am craving a quality immersion event and I know that is what Rod Miller will provide. I have heard so many great things on this event from quality first person along with a public that is engaged with what is going on while not taking away from our experience.


    https://www.facebook.com/groups/378472008907818/

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank Trent
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    I'll add that the spectators last year were some of the most interesting and most knowledgeable I've encountered at an event, and I have no reason to believe it won't be the same this upcoming year. Here's something I posted on another forum after the previous event:

    ---

    I just came back from a living history with maybe 50 reenactors, US, CS and civilian, interpreting the situation around Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, 1863. My role was to be a representative plantation owner living under Yankee occupation for the last year, and to talk about what that was like.

    There was a steady trickle of spectators most of the day, but few enough that you could generally interact with just one or two families at a time.

    I'd give a 2 or 3 minute summary, then wait to see if they asked questions, looked expectant for more, or walked on. Most either asked questions or wanted more, so I'd give another minute or so of more detail, then pause again, and eventually they asked questions or went on.

    Here are some of the things they asked and/or topics they wanted to hear discussed. I could answer most of these, certainly not all, and some better than others, but the primary goal of first person intepretation is to keep the illusion going, so it's easy enough to brush off a hard question and shift it onto a similar topic you know more about.

    "Did they grow different varieties of corn in the north and south?"

    "Why don't you want slaves educated?"That morphed into a discussion on the different philosophy about education in the north and south for whites too.

    "Do you use local plants for medicine? [Picking a handful of seed from a nearby dock plant] What's this? What's it good for?"

    [After I said I'd done well in the 1830s, till the price of land and slaves dropped] "You mean due to the panic of 1837?" [Visitors are not necessarily stupid.]

    "What do you miss most since the blockade?"

    "Didn't the United Methodist Church split due to slavery?" [Then after a discussion of how the various Protestant denominations were affected by the slavery controversy:] "How did the Catholics feel?"

    "What do you think of Henry Clay?"

    "When slaves reach Canada, are they free?"

    "Do you think slaves have souls?"

    "How do you get low-pectin fruits to gel without adding extra pectin?" [We weren't making jelly. It's funny what people would want to know if they could step into the past.]

    "Christmas isn't a very big holiday, is it?" [Not sure if that was a trick question or if he didn't realize how big it was on plantations compared to earlier and/or more puritanical attitudes]

    "Do they use dogs to catch slaves north of the Ohio River or is that more when they're still in the south?" [resulted in a long discussion about training dogs to catch runaways]

    "What's the Biblical justification for slavery?"

    "Did they sometimes sell families together so they'd be less apt to run away?" [resulted in discussion about transporting slave coffles]

    "How do you learn about new plants to grow?" [Started from a discussion about educating slaves, morphed into the pre-war US patent office]

    There were lots more I can't recall, but that gives a good sampling.

    Hank Trent
    hanktrent@gmail.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Rmhisteach
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Originally posted by bdacus View Post
    Interested.. So you all are doing Brice's Crossroads that happened in Guntown MS? But the event is in Illinois. Would Mississippi not let y'all in?? Just kidding.
    Brent
    The folks involved in this effort have been part of LH events at most of the civil war battle fields in accross the US . We have done immersion an semi immersion events in the midwest for a few years now. Mostly an attempt to have a quality event in which we don't have to drive 8 hours or more to get on sight. Let me know if you have additional questions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brent Dacus
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Interested.. So you all are doing Brice's Crossroads that happened in Guntown MS? But the event is in Illinois. Would Mississippi not let y'all in?? Just kidding.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rmhisteach
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    thanks for the diary post ,Terre!

    Leave a comment:


  • Spinster
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    As I prepare some other folks for an event on the historical ground at Brice's Crossroads in a few days, I though y'all might enjoy this. Today, the quiet field and forests of GunTown, Mississippi provide a good bit of period dyestuffs for my iron kettles and copper pots.

    From the larger diary of Samuel Agnew, as transcribed in the collection of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Documenting the American South Collection
    http://docsouth.unc.edu/imls/agnew/agnew.html


    June 9, 1864

    Forrest gone towards Rienzi

    Many days have intervened since I wrote in this journal, but now (June 14) I will proceed to the task. On the 9th during the forenoon I assisted Uncle Jo in making some rope on our rope works. The news we had was that Rucker had gone with his Brigade towards Rienzi. General Forrest with his entire command has gone towards Rienzi. The Yankees were reported to have gone in the same direction. We hence felt very easy, thinking that for the present we would not be troubled with Yankees. Late this evening Thompson Phillips came over, telling us that Oliver Nelson had sent word down that the Yankees were coming down the Ripley road this evening, and it was not known whether they would go towards Baldwyn or Guntown. Sent the mules off to the wood lot. Went over and told Uncle Joseph of the facts, Brought the mules in at dark. We were discredit[ing] the Yankee news. The day was pleasant.

    June 10, 1864

    Yankees coming--

    The morning was cloudy. At breakfast learn that the Yankees

    Page 301
    camped at Stubbs' last night. Although we did not suppose they would travel this road I went out early with the mules into the woods back of the Watson field. Went over to Uncle Jo's to notify him of the report. Got lost on the way. While at Uncle Jo's hear a roaring towards Lyons Gin which I did not understand. Came on back. Stopped at the far end of the lane to take observation. While there hear two horsemen approaching down through the thickets back of the farm. Await untill I could hear them conversing, then put my horse to the run and escaped to the thickets. I have reason now to think that the approaching horsemen were Yankees. Got back to camp. Loll about and read Harris Highlands of Ethiopia. About 10 o'clock heard the report of cannon towards Baldwyn. Suppose that the enemy had gone down the Baldwyn road and had met Forrest there. Walked over to the western fence of the Watson field to note directions of the cannonading. Concluded it was about the Cross Roads. The cannonading continued with brief intermission for several hours. While at the Watson field saw Arch skulking through the woods. He told me that the Yankees were at our house and had taken everything we had to eat. About 50 waggons were in the front of our road, and the yard was full of thousands of negroes. This was bad news but I hoped that Arch being badly frightened had exagerated. His news caused us to keep quiet, and not attempt to communicate with the house. Listen intently and anxiously to the firing.

    The battle--danger from shells

    The battle raged long and doubtfully for some time in the

    Page 302
    direction of the Cross Roads. About 5 o'clock the firing evidently drew nearer, and I was satisfied it was near Holland's. About 6 o'clock to my surprise shells began to fall in the woods where I was hid. At the time I first noticed them, I was near the Watson field, taking observations. Shells coming over rapidly with a whizzing noise we deemed it prudent to get out of the way. Just as we were leaving the back of the field I heard some persons talking near us. I supposed it was Pa conducting Mother & Nannie and came very near going to their assistance, but just then a shell came whizzing with a peculiarly unpleasant noise over my head and I betook myself to the mules. The negroes there told me that a shell had fallen near them, cutting off a limb from a tree. As speedily as we could we moved down. Saw Uncle Jo in the woods. He told me the Yankees were in our wheat field in thousands. It was them that I heard just before I left the Watson field. He could give no intelligence from home. I was greatly uneasy. The battle evidently was then raging there.

    Battle at the Cross Roads

    I rode with the mules down near Uncle Young's and stopped N of his home farm. Walked over and got supper, Erskine with me. They could give me no news from home. The battle was fought principally around the Cross Roads. 12 Yankees had come on a scout to Uncle Young's. They fired on him as he was leaving home. His fine clothing and hat was captured. He was taking them to a place

    Page 303
    of safety, but in the race lost them. The battle at the Cross Roads was very severe. The ground all around the Cross Roads is covered with the wounded and the dead. Gen. Lee had a son killed. The enemy fought desperately, making a stubborn fight, but finally were driven back and at last accounts the fighting was going on about our house. Forrest was in the front, pursuing with vigor.

    June 11, 1864

    Appearances about home

    Was in the woods all night. It was showery. By light was up, and walked over to Uncle Young's. Got no additional information. I was very anxious in reference to the family and came on up home cautiously. Find that the Yankees have been driven away. Our once pleasant home was a wreck. My very heart pained me when I beheld the desolation wrought. Thanks to a merciful God the lives of the family were preserved although they were exposed to great danger. The garden and yard fences were torn down. Our yard was full of horses. Soldiers were stalking through the yard and house, without any ceremony. Yankee waggons line in the road. Before I reached the house I found the road filled with shoes, and articles of almost every description which had been thrown away by the Yankees in the retreat. Dead negroes lay stretched cold in death on the road side. I saw 2 before I came to the gate. The road was filled with soldiers passing to and fro. When I saw these things I knew that Forrest had gained a great and complete victory, but my heart sank within

    Page 304
    me at the prospect of our own losses & found Mother, Nannie, Mary and Margaret in the back piazza. They were laughing and talking but under their mirth I could see a sadness conceiled.

    House plundered--no food left

    They told me that the Yankees had taken away every ear of corn, and every pound of meat, leaving us nothing to eat. That they had not eaten a bite since the previous morning. That the house had been plundered. I walked through the rooms and find everything turned upside down and nearly everything we had taken from us. Dead and wounded men were lying in the house. The walls of the house had been perforated by a good many canister and grape balls. One shrapnell struck the guttering on the south side of the dining room. Negroes and white men both plundered the house and nothing could move their hearts to pity, but with vandal hands they rifled trunks, bureaus and rooms. They entered every room but the catch-all. Destruction seemed to be their aim. I have heard of many things they took away, but cannot recapitulate. Even the negroes were robbed of their clothing &c. The expedition was commanded by Gen. Sturgis, a resident of Chicago, Ill. Grierson commanded the cavalry.

    Negroe troops--insolence

    The negroes were especially insolent. As they passed the road they shook their fists at the ladies and told them they were going to show Forrest that they were his rulers. As they returned their tune was changed. With tears in their eyes they came to my Mother

    Page 305
    and asked her what they must do. Would Mr. Forrest kill them. Poor fools, many a simpleton lies rotting along the road this day. I felt sorry when I saw the first one, but when I heard how they did I lost all my sympathy for the black villians. The Yankees as they went along estimated their force at 50,000. As they went back they said they had 12000 while Forrest had 30,000. They acknowledged on the retreat that they had got the worst whipping they ever had had. On the retreat Sturgis was in the front going at a trot. 2 Yankees surrendered to Mother before the battle here.

    Our yard a battle-ground

    While the fighting was going on at the Cross Roads Yankees were on the place all the time. When it was evident that there would be a fight here a Yankee told Mother that she had better leave the house as the Rebs were agoing to shell it. They told the negroes that if the whites left the house they would burn it. When the fight commenced Mother and the rest of them closed the doors and window-blinds and lay flat on the floor in Margaret's room, and remained safely untill our men drove them away. The Yard was a battle ground, the Southerners on the South side and the Yankees next the crib. The Yankees made a breast work of the fence between the Yard and Crib lot. The Yankee battery was in front of our gate. Rice's artillery was just below the garden. The fight here was nearly as stubborn as at the Cross Roads. Capt. Rice told me that the artillery saved the day here. When he came up the cavalry were retreating. The cavalry say this is the only

    Page 306
    time the artillery ever did them any good. In front of the house the marks of the bullets are plainly to be seen. These and many other things I heard.

    Uneasiness about Pa

    Crowds thronged the whole country. Many came from distant neighborhoods to view the battleground. Rode down to Uncle Young's. My heart was so full at our situation that I could hardly talk. Came back and Pa was still absent. Mother & May were crying about him and I must acknowledge I myself was uneasy about him. Rode over to Uncle Jo, and with him scour the branch bottom this side of his house, but with no success. Then came on home via Lyons' Gin House. Saw many waggons filled with ammunition, crackers and many other things. The dog Lincoln was out with Pa. He came in this evening. Some fear that he has been found by the Yankees and killed, others that he has been captured and taken off. While others think that he has become faint in the woods, and perhaps has lain down, unable to go. He was seen yesterday evening, back of the Davis patch by J. N. Haddon. He, Uncle Jo, Martin Beaty, Hickey Holmes and myself commenced searching in that direction and found him in the thickets after a brief search. He has seen the trains of waggons on the roadside, and supposing they were still held by the Yankees he kept the bushes. His discovery lifted up a load of anxiety from my breast. The neighbors are very kind, Uncle Jo especially so. Forrest today is after the Yankees, we have various reports from him.

    Page 307

    June 12, 1864

    Burying the dead--rain

    Sabbath. A very rainy day, and such crowds have been passing: so many guns have been firing and so many persons have been about the house that it has not seemed like a sabbath. Pa, Uncle Jo & Martin took the negroes and buried the Yankee's negroes whoose bodies lie near. It rained so much that operations were suspended untill the afternoon. Some Yankee prisoners--4 in number--were brought out this evening, to assist in burying the dead. They were from Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Illinois. They are down upon their officers, say that in a fight they are always in the rear, and on a retreat at the front. Three white men are buried near us, viz Rice of the 7th Tenn. King of Rice's Battery, and A. J. Smith. The Yankees are buried shallow, the negroes especially so.

    Wounded and sick with us

    I sat about the house the entire day, doing nothing of great moment. Pa had the negroes repairing his fencing. Some Kentuckians are camped under the crib. Some just from Paducah report the draft progressing in Ky. A good many of the drafted men are joining our army. Of 4500 drafted in Cincinnatti only 50 have reported. We have with us a Mr. Carr of Yallabusha Co. who is seriously wounded in the abdomen. Dr. Jackson is waiting on him. The Dr. seems to be an intelligent, steady physician and kind man. A Mr. Alex Bobo and Jessie Andrew of Panola. Co. belonging to Chalmers' 18th Reg't

    Page 308
    are also here. They furnish their own rations. These all seem to be nice. Three other wounded men were here but they were removed to the Hospital on saturday. The people are riding over the battle field from some distance. Although the day has been rainy I notice many ladies riding over the road.

    June 13, 1864

    The stench--return of Forrest

    The road has been still the scene of continued travelling by the soldiers. The waggons which were captured are being taken down the road. Forrest has made a rich capture.

    This morning walk over the ground near us. Find many dead horses and mules and the stench is great. Gen. Forrest passed back today. I noticed nothing special in his appearance. Understand he is in a bad humor--having been informed that the citizens have been "stealing" many of the articles from the Yankee waggons. Gen. Buford also passed. He is a large chuffy man. Gen. Lyon also went down. A good many troops passed down today. The pursuit of the enemy has been discontinued. They were followed to Salem. Some troops followed farther. At Ripley an Saturday there was a sharp fight. Pa rode over to Hollands to concert some measures in reference to obtaining some supplies from Forrest. His provisions were taken from him and were all captured by Forrest, and he thinks that perhaps he can have it restored to him. Officers tell him that they think an application will be successful. Holland and Brice will act with him. And will go down and see the General as

    Page 309
    soon as matters get quiet. 800 Yankee prisoners passed down today, under guard. It is impossible to find one who will acknowledge that he ever plundered. One remarked as he came up here's the man that caught your Turkeys. Another was heard to say here's the place where we got the wine. Some officers were among them. Nice looking men they were. A few negroes brought up the rear. The most of the negroes were shot, our men being so much incensed that they shoot them wherever they see them. It is certain that a great many negroes have been killed. The prisoners pointed out their positions here. One was in the yard, one in the road, another in the woods & one pointed out a tree and said I shot at a big fat rebel from behind that tree. A good many regiments were along, I do not know all, the 9th Minnesota, 2 Iowa Cav'l'y, 81st, 104 Illinois, &c. The day was showery.

    Wrote to Mrs. McKell today in haste to give her an account of the recent battle and assure her of our safety.

    June 14, 1864

    At the Cross Roads--sad scenes

    Affairs are becoming quieter, but there are many still passing. Commence bringing up this journal. This evening rode over to Hollands' to see him about the proposed application to Forrest for provisions. Find the roads badly cut up by the waggons and artillery that are passing every hour. The lane of Wm. Phillips has become impassible, and the waggons go in by Mrs. Phillips house now. See

    Page 310
    several graves on the road-side. The negroes are covered with very little dirt. The stench from dead horses is almost insupportable. It is sickening to pass along the roads. With Holland rode on over to Brice's. See the marks of the battle: but not so apparent as I had supposed. His house and yard are public property now. Sick men occupy the rooms. Some poor fellows are mortally wounded. I felt sorry when I looked on the poor fellows, dieing so far from the dear ones at home. They are lying on pallets. Some Yankees are also there. The Church seems to be occupied by sick prisoners. The principle surgeon was operating on a Yankee while I was there. He was lieing on a table insensible being under the influence of Chloroform. His right foot had been amputated and his left hand 1/2 taken out. As I came home saw a gentleman just from Johnson army. On the 8th he was still about New Hope Church in quietness. See a Prairie News of this morning. It called the battle of friday the battle near Baldwyn. In Virginia Grant and Lee very near each other. The battles of the 4 & 5th of May were not decisive. In some places the lines of the armies are only 50 yds. apart. The decisive battle is yet to be fought. In Georgia the armies present about the old appearance. And the decisive battle is yet to be fought there also. The N. Y. Herald of the 8th announces that on the 8th the Republican convention nominated Abraham Lincoln for the Presidency and Andrew Johnson of Tennessee for the Vice Presidency. They are a delicious duo. Mr. Boyd, the gentleman just from Johnston's army lives near Portersville Tenn. A Mr. Sergant of this county is here tonight. He is

    Page 311
    just from Richmond on the 4th June. Luther Richey and William Agnew were well at that time. He says Lee cannot be whipped.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rmhisteach
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Registration fee goes for Rations . This event is what they used to call a n empty haversack event:-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeremy Bevard
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    I have heard nothing but great things about the last events Rod has done at this site. I am looking foward to being part fo this one. It will also be the next event I can get to this year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Utley
    replied
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Rod,

    Can you send me an email to chris@southunionmills.com so I will have your email address? I've tried sending PMs but your inbox is full. I wanted to get with you about some USCC things.

    Thanks!

    Chris

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X