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  • Primary Accounts Thread

    I'll be posting research and primary accounts in this thread in advance of the event.

    Today we start with Henry J. Wieneke. Wieneke was a baker and cabinet maker from Iowa City, Iowa who enlisted on the 14th Iowa in October, 1861. His diary provides a unique insight into the life of the battalion, as he was a musician detailed as a cook during our period of interest. His diary is detailed in Mildred Throne's article, "Iowa Troops in the Dakota Territory, 1861-1864.” Iowa Journal of History. Vol 57, No 2. (April, 1959).

    Henry's first entry:

    "W[ednesday] Oct 23rd1861 Sworn into U. S. service. Cold that I could hardly finger the fiffe."

    So on this day in 1861, the men of companies A, B and C are sworn into government service. The adventure begins.
    Bob Welch

    The Eagle and The Journal
    My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

  • #2
    Re: Primary Accounts Thread

    Bob, consider posting images of the area where the event will take place, and an overview of purpose.
    Ray White

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Primary Accounts Thread

      Ray-

      I'll post images soon, both past and present soon. Here's an aerial view of the fort in 1862 that I posted in another thread. http://www.fortwiki.com/images/c/ce/...ndall_Plan.png

      As to a purpose, this is intended to educate the general public about the garrison life of an outpost in the Far West, but it's also an opportunity to experience garrison life and all of its boredom. These men enlisted to put down a rebellion and ended up sitting out on the plains of Dakota for the length of the war. It's our goal to honor their service.
      Bob Welch

      The Eagle and The Journal
      My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Primary Accounts Thread

        November 2, 1861.

        Today's account comes from the diary of Amos R. Cherry, a sergeant in Company B. A native of New York, Cherry lived in Iowa City before his enlistment. He was a prolific diarist, and we will see much more from Sergeant Cherry.

        "Saturday Nov 2nd. Left camp at Kirkwoods at eleven Oclock A. M. and marched ten miles and encamped at or near the residence of Mrs. Douglass in Clear Creek Town Ship. We arrived there at half past three Oclock P. M. We was all somewhat tired with this our first days march but after a good nights rest we came out as good as ever again and was ready for the next days march. While we was in camp at this place we was presented with a beautiful Flag by the Ladies of Clear Creek. They apeared in camp about eight Oclock in the evening acompanied by Mr Evans Esq.r who presented the Flag in behalf of the Ladies. The Battalion was ordered into line and large Bond Fires was built in front of the line when the Ladies was escorted in by the Band and marched up in front of the ranks when they was greeted with three cheeres from the troops. Mr. Evans then addressed the men and presented the Flag to Capt Pattee” with some very approprate and soul stiring remarks which was responded to by Capt. Pattee with a fiew but approprate remarks. Lut Luse” of Co. B. was then called upon and came out and made some very spicey remarks which was then loudly cheered by the Battallion. Miss Washburn then appeared and adressed the troops in a very able manner and exorted us to prove ourselves true and brave men and allso to prove true to this just cause and that she hoped and believed that we as brave men of Iowa would maintain the honor of that beautifule emblem of our Country's glory which they as patriotic Ladies had presented us with. When she withdrew and as she finished speaking three times three cheeres was given and this was not enough, cheer after cheer went up for Miss Washburn and the patriotic Ladies of Clear Creek long may they wave. Co. B. was then called upon for a Song and we of course complied and sang the happy Land of cannain which was cheered loudly by all pressant. We was then dissmised and we all retired for the night. Several Ladies was in camp at this camp from Iowa City that I was acquainted with. One of them was Miss Della Zimmerman from our old neighborhood."
        Bob Welch

        The Eagle and The Journal
        My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Primary Accounts Thread

          On November 3, Henry Wieneke penned a letter to the Iowa City Republican which the paper will publish on November 6.

          Homestead, November 3, 1861
          Messrs. Editors: - Companies A, B and C, of the 14thregiment, are all right, have just eaten their dinner, and are moving westward. They are as good boys as ever trod terra firma and should they ever have a chance on the bloody field of battle, they will add new laurels to the honored name of Iowa. The Ladies of Clear Creek township came to ‘camp Washburn’ last evening, and presented this portion of the Iowa 14th with a magnificent Flag. Mr Evans, in behalf of the Ladies, made an appropriate speech, and was responded to by Capt. Pattee and Lieut. Luse. The most captivating And patriotic address I ever listened to, was delivered by Miss Washburn of Iowa City. Patriotic songs were sung by Prof. Kelly and others. The Professor is one of the cleverest men in Iowa, and in his new position of Orderly Sergeant, will sing a different song, provided he is ever permitted to have a class of secessionists to deal with . . .

          Wieneke's Diary: Sunday Nov 3rd 1861 up to within 3 miles of Marengo . . . traveled 18 miles

          Amos Cherry Diary: Sunday, 3rd. Left camp again this morning at eight Oclock and marched twenty miles and encamped two miles east of Marrengo on Bear Creek. We marched very fast this day and was all very tired when we arrived in camp at night and you could have seen the men laying arround in all directions upon the grass or leaning upon their guns. The reason of our marching so fast this day was this. It was Co. C's turn to march to the right (or in front) and they made their braggs that they was going to run Co. A. and B. down before we reached demoin [Des Moines] and they strung out like a pack of wild Bulls and at times they would call out to us (for we was next to them) close up Co. B. close up and we did close up to and tread their heels about as close as they cared abbout. We would have kept up with them if it had killed us all. Co. A. was in the rear and would call out to give it to them Co. B. and I tell you the Wapseys as they call themselves got enough of that days march trying to run Co. A, and B. During this march we passed through Home Stead and the Dutch Colony. Neither of these towns are of much importance. Home Stead has a population of about one hundred. The Dutch Colony” has a population of about five hundred I should judge from the appearance of it. It is a very pretty town and things has the appearance of being well conducted. Every thing appears to be in its place and a place for every thing. It is a beautifull farming Country arround the Collony and it is allso well cultivated.

          For those familiar with eastern Iowa, this means the battalion passed through the Amana Colonies.
          Bob Welch

          The Eagle and The Journal
          My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Primary Accounts Thread

            Henry Wieneke: Monday Nov 4th 1861 Spent a miserable night very strong fever, head felt like bursting. Went into Marengo and bught crackers &c and Carried Crackers until dinner time when I caught up with the team we traveled 13 miles Encamped on mud Creeke.

            Amos Cherry: Monday, 4th. Left Camp this morning at eight Oclock and marched fifteen miles and encamped again on Bear Creek 12 miles west of Marrengo. We passed through Marrengo to day in four ranks and made a very good appearance. We was welcomed by the people of that place who manifested their Loyality to the Union by causing the Stars and Stripes to float from every public building and flagg staff in the town as they saw us approaching the place. When we marched through this place the band played the very approprate air the girl I left Behind me.
            is The Amana Community. Homestead was purchased by the society in You may rest assured that when I heard this favourite air it brought many sweet recollections before my vision. Often now when I hear this air do I think of the girls I left behind me. This morning was the first time we saw a Scarcety of provisions but if eatables was not scarce this morning at our camp near Marrengo they never was scarce if I understand what scarcity means. Well I will tell you what we had to call a breakfast that morning. It was this one flap Jack and a half peice of boild Beef about as large as a good large potato and a pint cup full of coffie sweetned with some very poor brown shugar. Our flap Jacks was one half flower and one half corn meal and mixed up with cold creek watter. Was not this rather tough feed for men on the march but such was our breakfast on the morning of our second days march through a plentifull and peaceable country with plenty of provisions which could have easily been procured at any time but our commanding Officer did not exert himself to get them and we was obliged to get allong without them which we done by calling at Farm Houses and telling the people our true situation and the way we was being treated and in every instance they freely gave to us all as long as they had any thing eatable to give. Co. B this day refused to march in ranks and was of course much scattered. At times not more than fifteen men of Co. B was to be seen in ranks the remainder being scattered along the road for two or three miles back but every man answered to his name at camp at the six Oclock Roll Call. We never left ranks without first asking permission of Lut Luse who was in command of Co. B. He said to the men if they could get what was necesarry to Sustain them on the long and weareysome march before them by calling [at] houses along the road they was at liberty to do so but Co. A and C was not so fortunate their Officers being more ridged in the enforcement of their Diciplin and not allowing a man to leave the ranks under any conditions whatever and at some times when their men came into camp at night they was allmost exausted with hunger and fatigue while Co. Bs men would all be in camp in time for Roll Call and have enough with them for a good Supper besides getting a good dinner allong the road at some kind old Farmers House. On the night of the fourth we had a good supper in camp that we had begged allong the road and brought with us into camp. Our evenings meal that night consisted of Slap Jacks Molasses butter squash cabbage vinegar beef coffie shugar and milk which made up quite a styleish supper and you bet it was rellished by us all. After eating this our evenings meal we all took to cuting up and having a good time in every way we could. Some was jumping others was wrestleing and others siting in their tents singing some favourite peice of music or an army song and another thing we had a fine lot of sport over and it was this. One of the men went out into the woods hunting and killed an Owl and brought it into camp with them. The boys thought this a fine chance to have some fun and at it they went. They would take the Owl and go slyly up to the dore of some tent and carefully draw open the folds of the tent dore and send the Owl in amongst the men that are gathered inside telling over the adventures of the day when in would come the old Owl casting terror amongst the assembled Braves inside and the next thing you would see would be one of the boys running down through the camp as if all the rebbles of the south was after him and some ones head sticking out of the tent telling what he would do if ever he found out who done that and Lut Schell” amused himself by takeing this old Owl and throwing it into our tent and takeing me right fair in the mouth. No sooner had it came in than I went out and if I could have seen any one near I would have snatched him bald at one grab but the sport did not end here. He came into our tent after I had gone in and wanted to know what the trouble was (apearring very innocent). Says I you own up now to the truth or I will clean out every Lutenment in the camp and he roared out laughing which told us very well who done it. Well after awhile he went back to his tent and he and Lut Luse was studying over a pile of papers and in went the old Owl again right into the midst of the papers scattering them in all directions. When Luse says what in thunder does that mean Jo, who was that. Oh says Jo that is nothing but some of the boys fun. Well says Luse that aint as much fun as it is cracked up to be I dont think. So this ends this nights sport and the nine Oclock tattoo told us that the bed time had arrived and we all retired for the night and slept soundly after our nights sport.

            Cherry's diary entry begins a theme complaining about a lack of food on the march. This will be contested by other sources, but it illustrates the onset of a lack of discipline by the men of Company B.

            Map so Far.png
            Bob Welch

            The Eagle and The Journal
            My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Primary Accounts Thread

              Henry Wieneke: Tuesday 5th Went ahead with team and Begged Bread had enough to feed them for dinner. Rested about 3 miles from Brooklyn went into town and loafed until 4 o’clock camped north of town on big Bear Crooked Creek

              Amos Cherry: Teusday, 5th. Left camp at Bear Creek at half past eight Oclock and made a march of twelve miles and reached Brooklyn at three Oclock, and encamped near the town and near a creek of fine watter. Brooklyn is a small town and allso a very pretty town. Its population is about three hundred. The town is situated upon a high Bluff. While we was encamped at this place we was favoured with visits from the fair Sex of Brooklin who sang several very pretty songs and allso some very approprate ones for our benifit. We of course extended to them all the courtesy due these congenial beings. After they had entertained us very agreably for some time they returned to their homes and we was preparing for to retire when it was anounced that we was to be serenaded by the Brooklin Brass Band and soon they apeared in camp and favoured us with some excellent music played Dixey, Hail Columbia, Yankey Doodle and many other favourite National airs. They then returned to their homes and we to our tents but before they left Co. B was called upon for a Song and again sang the good old Happy Land of Cannain which was cheered by all present. While here we was the recipants of many gifts in shape of eatables. The patriotic people of Brooklin will long be remembered by the men of the Battallion. After our evenings entertainment we all retired for the night and slept soundly untill morning it being rather warm in our tents however but we did not mind this for we had the cheereing prospect before us of seeing cool weather before we reached Randall.
              Map so Far.png
              Bob Welch

              The Eagle and The Journal
              My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                Henry Wieneke: Wednesday Nov 6thStarted at Six this morning and traveled 18 miles to grinel Powsheik Co went ahead of the train and begged Bread enough for Supper the Country this day was all prairie and you could travel for [?] Hours without seeing a house. Had another attack of fever this evening being the third got medicine from Surgeon must Start at six tomorrow morning ahead of the train

                Amos Cherry: Wednesday, 6th. Left camp at Brooklin this morning at seven Oclock and marched twenty miles and reached Grenell. We refused to march in ranks to day on acount of not getting enough to eat but we did not suffer you may bet for we called at allmost every house and in most cases found the people very liberal in giving provisions to the Soldiers. I hope they may be rewarded for their kindness at some future time. We found Grenell a very pretty town indeed. We arrived there about four Oclock, P. M. and encamped on some vacant Lots in the Subburbs of the town. We found the people very kind indeed in fact every thing that they had that would add to our comfort was freely given. Rest ashured that we did not suffer for the necsessaries of life while at the town Grenell. We had not only the substantial things of life but we had the luxuries of life. Our camp looked like one vast Bakery or provision Store. I tell you these things was thankfully received and the soldiers friends of this place will long be rememberd for their kindness. While we was here I attended a danceing party at the Read House and had a splendid time. I did not expect to atend another party until I returned to Iowa but I was happily disapointed for as I was preparing to go to bed Seargant Pumphrey" came up along the line of tents calling for Seargant Cherry. I did not at first care much about answering thinking perhaps I would be politly asked to take a squad of men to bring watter or provisions from town or perhaps to get some of the Boys that was up in town on a spree but I answered however. Says he, where are you. Says I, here I am going to Bed, when he came to the tent dore and called me out and said there was a dance up town and wished to know if I would go up. I told him I would exactly so I got out my full uniform and came out and went down to the Oficers tent and there found Pumphrey, Wm. Mahanna” and Lut Luse waiting for me. We went at once up to the Hottell and was [met] politely by the proprietor and escorted into the dressing room. After fixing up in the best of Style and brightening up our brass works we was then invited to walk into the Parlor which we done with all the pleasure imaginable whare we found some very handsome young Ladies and allso some very interesting and intelligent ones allso. We was all introduced by Lut Luse to all the people presant. We soon selected Partners for a dance and at it we went and had a good time. We danced until about one Oclock and after eating a splendid supper we returned to camp. Need I say that us Soldiers was great favourites with the Ladies that evening. We of Brass Button noteritery was all the rage. After sleeping about four hours I was awakned in the morning at the roll of the acustomed Revelle. After eating a good Breakfast we was ready for the march.

                Again, Sergeant Cherry discusses discipline issues in Company B related to perceived issues related to food. When compared with his account of the food available at Grinnell, it is my opinion that these events are actually the men rebelling against army rations and are an expression of dissatisfaction with army discipline.

                Map so Far.png
                Bob Welch

                The Eagle and The Journal
                My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                  November 7, 1861

                  Henry Wieneke: Thursday Nov 7thStarted in good time but on the wrong road and traveled 3 miles when I had to go overland or under land for it was all through sloughs for about 2 miles I traveled purety fast and made Newton by 2 oclock P. M. in the evening went up to town with 200 wt of flour and took it around to different houses for baking. Then unhitched on an open lot and went to sleep

                  Amos Cherry: Thursday, 7th. Left camp at Grenell at eight Oclock and marched twenty miles and reached Newton in Jasper Co. We did not suffer any from want of provisions to day for the good people of Grenell filled our haversacks well before we left there so we had a plenty on this days march and made the march without any trouble and kept good order and kept in ranks. Allso we found the people of Newton very kind but business more dull than at Grenell. Newton has a population of 1,500. Wm. Boyd and I obtained a pass from Lut Luse to go ahead of the command in the afternoon in order to find Mr. Bain and Mr. Teft [?] but they lived so far from town that we thought we would not go to see them. They live about six miles from Newton so we did not go. We stayed in town until the command came along when we joined them and started to go with them down into camp but we had not gone far when Seargant Pumphrey came along and caught me by the arm and says he let us go up town and get our supper. Well says I I dont care. We turned round and went back. When we came up with the rear of the company whare Lut Schell was he asked us whare we was going. We told him we was going up town to get our supper. All right says he and we went on and did get our supper and a good one to. After supper we went down into camp and found it full of Ladies who was singing songs and entertaining the Soldiers in every way they could. We done all we could to make it apear that their songs was listned to with pleasure and that the moral that was contained in many of them was duly apreciated by us. After they had finished singing we thought we should return the compliment by singing one to so we Co. B. struck up and sang the Happy Land of Cannain which was responded to by a Rev. Gentlemen from town in a neat little speech. After he had finished three cheeres was given for the people of Grenell Newton and vicinity long may they live in the enjoyment of heavens choicest Blessings. After they had all returned to their homes we took to our tents and layed ourselves down for a little rest

                  Map so Far.png
                  Bob Welch

                  The Eagle and The Journal
                  My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                    November 8, 1861

                    Henry Wieneke: Friday Nov 8th Capt Mahanna arrived this morning at 5 oclock went around and gathered Bread got about 150 Lbs went down to Camp and went out on the State road Stopped at a farm house and Eat Dinner Went on made 20 miles this day the Sandiest road I ever saw Capt Mahanna gave me a letter from Carie this evening it did me more good than if someone had given me 50 D am very tired this evening about 5 miles of the road was verry bad all sand the Horse Could hardly travel over it

                    Amos Cherry: Friday, 8th. Resumed our march this morning at nine Oclock and marched eighteen miles and encamped on Camp Creek fourteen miles east of De Moin we broke ranks a great deal this day in order to get provisions and was very sucsessfull finding the people very kind and willing to do any thing to make us comfortable. The men was very tired to night and many of them suffering from sore feet. My feet however did not give out yet and I got along finely. Lambert Martins feet was very sore this night so bad he could hardly walk. The night we was in camp here was very cold and disagreable and the men being very near worn out went to bed early. After all was still in camp I and a corprall and our Orderly Seargant went to the cook and asked him if he would cook us some chickens on the shares if we would get them. He said he would so when Co. B. Guards was in I went to Guard No 1 and told him I wanted to go out and take some men out with me. Well says he it is all right. So I got the Boys togather and out we went and paid our respects to an old Sescessionest that lived near by way of paying our respects to his hen roost and after getting a chicking or two apeice we returned to the camp and had a good mess of chickens that night and allso had the fun of stealing them besides. It has been said that stolen fruit is sweet and I geus it is a true saying for nothing was relished more by me than that mess of chickens. On our way up to the house says Corpral Welling what if we should get catched at this. Oh says Orderly Seargant Dennis it dont make any differance. We are all Seargants. Let it rip. Who cares. We will get the chickens you know. Well by the time the chickens was devoured it was one Oclock and we all went to bed and slept until morning.

                    Map so Far.png
                    Bob Welch

                    The Eagle and The Journal
                    My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                      November 9, 1861

                      Wieneke: Sat 9th 1861 Started ahead again and made 15 miles to Des Moines by 12 Oclock had a hard snow Storm this morning but cleared up by noon Camped about half past 3 oclock in the forks of the Des moin and Skunk [sic. Raccoon]Rivers Des moin is about 4/5 as large as Iowa City

                      Cherry: Saturday, 9th. Left camp at eight Oclock this morning and marched fourteen miles and reached Fort De Moin at three Oclock P. M. and encamped in the outskirts of the town in the forks of coon and De Moin rivers. Had a very pretty place for our camp and enjoyed ourselves finely. Found the people very kind but not the same good feeling toward the soldiers that was manifested at Grenell and Newton. When we came into our camping place Capt Pattee marched his company up to the left and pitched his tents. His company and Co. C. went to work and set up their tents and we got orders not to leave ranks and there we stood in ranks with our arms at an order and all attention. Pattee came up and says he Capt why dont you put up your tents over there why do you keep your men standing here for. Says Capt Mahanna” I shall not pitch my tents until I can pitch them on the left whare they should be that is the place for my company and when I get my rights I will break ranks and set up my tents and not one moment before. Why says Pattee what is the trouble. Says Mahanna you have marched your company to the left and pitched your tents whare you had no right to because it was a better peice of ground for a camp. Move your company out here to the right whare it should be and all will be right and not until this is done. My men shall not stack their arms mark that sir. So Pattee had to take up his tents and move them over to the right and we went to the left whare we should be and Pattee found that he could not fool Capt Mahanna much. Well all passed on smoothly for a while until some of the Boys wanted to go up town and Lut Cooper” of Pattees company was Officer of the day and he would not let the Boys be out when they was provided with a pass from Our Captain. They came back and told Mahanna that the Officer of the day would not let them pass the Guard. Well says Mahanna I will pass you out come with me all who want to go up town, when about fifty of Co. B. started with him for town. He went to the out posts and told the Guard to pass these men out. Says the Guard I had orders not to let any one out. Says Capt Mahanna call the Officer of the Guard or the Officer of the day. He called for the Officer of the day No. 1. He came and Mahanna says to him I want you to pass these men out. Says Cooper I had orders from Capt Pattee not to let any one out. Says our Capt I want to know sir if you are going to pass these men out if you dont I will. Says the Officer do you mean that you wont obey the orders of our commanding Officer. Mahanna turned arround and says Boys pass out pass out. I will see whether you wont go out on a pass from a commissioned Officer and out the Boys went and Cooper went off swearing about Co. B. and Captain Mahanna.

                      Captain Mahanna was a former member of the First Iowa, as were other members of Company B. Pattee has no prior military experience and largely owes his rank to his brother-in-law, Governor Samuel Kirkwood. Here we see the first signs of major tension between Mahanna and Pattee.

                      Map so Far.png
                      Bob Welch

                      The Eagle and The Journal
                      My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                        November 10, 1861

                        Wieneke: Sunday Nov 10th we did not move from here this day 1 man in Co C verry sick. Not expected to live . . .

                        Cherry: Sabath, 10th. Still at De Moin. I attended Church in the morning and evening at the Methodest church. I went in charge of a squad of sixty men of Co. B. and many of them went to other churches. I think every one of Co. B. except the Guard was at church that day. The people appeared to be pleased to see us at the church and received us very politely and took great pains to see that we was provided with seats. We heard a very good sermon both in the morning and evening. At night he preached a sermon on the war and complimented us very highly and with dificulty the Soldiers refrained from cheering him in the midst of the sermon. We went to and from church in perfect order and made a very fine appearance and was complimented by the people of De Moin.
                        Bob Welch

                        The Eagle and The Journal
                        My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                          Today a new voice enters the historic record of the 14th Iowa. Dr. S. N. Pierce was the battalion surgeon until the summer of 1862. He wrote a series of letters to the Cedar Falls Gazette documenting the life of the regiment.

                          November 11, 1861

                          Wieneke: Monday Nov 11th 1861 Member of Co C Died last night We staid in Camp all day he was Buried with Military Honors at 2 oclock P. M. it has been Cool and windy all day froz ˝ inch in our kettles last night . . .

                          Cherry: Monday, 11th. Still at De Moin. To day we performed the painfull duty of following one of our fellow Soldiers from Co. C. to the grave. His name was Maxwell” and was from Wappello, Louisa Co., Iowa. He was burried with the honors of war. He was followed to the grave by the whole command in full uniform with unfixed Bayonets and arms reversed. The drums was all muffled which made them sound very solem indeed. We went from the camp to the hottell whare the Boddy was and formed in two ranks in front of the house. The Band then played one or two tunes and the Boddy was brought out before the coller company when the Band again played a very solem air. The corpse was then carried up to the right and the Guard arround it the Band in front. We was then brought to a right face and moved toward the grave yard which was about one mile distant. The Band played the dead march and nothing was heard but the solem sound of the muffled drums the steady step of the men and the subdued commands of the Officers. After we arrived at the grave we was drawn up in two ranks at the mouth of the grave and three discharges was fired over his grave as soon as it was filled up. After this cerimony we returned to town at a quick step the Band haveing taken off the muffles. They played Yankey Doodle, the Girl I left Behind me, and many other favourite airs. After we returned to camp and stacked our arms and looked arround the camp was as still as a grave yard allmost not a loud voice was heard or any thing that would breake the silence and the solemnity of the scene. A large concourse of citizens allso followed us to the cemetary.

                          S. N. Pierce:

                          Correspondence of the Gazette.
                          From the Fort Randall “Boys.”
                          Camp Des Moines, Nov. 11, 1861.
                          Thinking a communication from the Fort Randall expedition might be of interest to the readers of the Gazette, I have seated myself in a wagon, for the purpose of attempting to give you a very brief account of our operations since we left Iowa City en route for Fort Randall. – The train left Iowa City on Thursday, October 31st, and camped abut two miles west of the city, near the residence of Gvernor Kirkwood. There they remained, until Saturday morning, when they started again, and went as far as Clear Creek, a distance of about fifteen miles. In the evening the camp was visited by the citizens of Clear Creek, who presented the soldiers with a beautiful flag. The presentation speech was made by Miss Washburn, and is represented by those who heard it as being one of the most eloquent and patriotic speeches of the season. This camp was named Camp Washburn in honor of this Lady. From this place the company started for Grinnell, which place they reached Wednesday noon. Here they were reenforced by the Cedar Falls Squad who had been there anxiously anticipating their arrival for five days.
                          The citizens of Grinnell gave the troops a hearty welcome. In the evening a large number of citizens visited the camp ground and manifested much interest in the comfort of the soldiers. Those soldiers that were sick were kindly invited to private houses, where they received as kind attention as they could expect even in their own homes. The ladies of the place also exhibited their patriotism, by furnishing the troops with an abundant supply of breads. This, seeing that we were entirely destitute of this necessary article, was very acceptable. You will readily believe that the Cedar Falls boys who had been at Grinnell nearly a week were rejoiced to hear the sound of the drum and fife, which indicated the approach of the army. By the way – those young men acknowledged themselves grandly sold for going to their homes with such uncouth uniforms, when by waiting at Iowa City a few hours longer they could have supplied with a dress uniform good enough for the most [obscured]. Each soldier is now furnished with a fine blue broadcloth cap, and a fine dress coat, also of blue, which makes a very dressy uniform. While at Grinnell, Capt. Pattee (our commanding officer) received a telegraphic dispatch ordering him to take his men to Council Bluffs and go from there by boat. The same communication stated that there had been a boat ordered up there for our express accommodation. This order came from Gen. McClellan, and you may believe that the soldiers were much pleased at the prospect of having their overland trip cut short a couple of hundred miles.
                          At eight o’clock on Thursday morning we were again on the march and reached Newton that evening, making a march of twenty-two miles. Our presence in Newton created a great sensation, and although we encamped two miles out of town our quarters were visited in the evening by large numbers of ladies and gentlemen who seemed very much pleased with our mode of living and were only prevented from joining us en masse by being told that there was no rooms room for them as our company was full. We left Camp Newton Friday morning and reached Clear Creek (No. 2) that night. On Saturday started for this place and arrived here at 3 P. M. We are now camping directly in the city, on the ground formerly occupied by the Fort. I do not know the population of Des Moines, but should judge by the number of persons who have visited our camp grounds, that there must be about 100,000. A more gay scene than our encampment presents in the evening when we are near a town could rarely be found. The Cedar Falls boys all seem to be enjoying themselves largely, and I presume to say that there is not one of them but “is glad he come.” They are all “hale and hearty,” and by their appearance you would suppose that they were natural born soldiers, and had spent all their days in the camp. This morning we were called upon to go through the grand by solemn ceremony of burying one of our soldiers in military style. The deceased was a private in Company C, by the name of Maxwell. He was a resident of Wappello, was taken sick in Iowa City, but was able to go about the camp until Saturday evening, when he was taken very suddenly with congestive fever, and died at two o’clock this morning. This is the only man in our company that has been seriously ill. Our train consists of 300 soldiers, armed and equipped, seven ladies, 23 baggage wagons, and one ambulance for the sick. When at home we occupy sixty houses. Each home is calculated to accommodate six persons. The houses are made of cloth and consist of one room, with no cellar or garret. There is a bigger home provided for each company which is occupied by the officers and is furnished with a cook stove. The soldiers do their cooking in the streets. The officers of Company A have gone in to the extravagance of putting an additionon their house. This addition is designed more particularly for the use of the surgeon and his family. In this house there are three ladies and eight gentlemen, one child, and a dog. We employ the “colored gentleman” who formerly worked at the American House to do the cooking and we manage to get along very comfortably. Capt. Pattee seems determined to do everything in his power to add to the comfort of his men, and is bound to be [last two lines of column obscured] management, it is either through ignorance of the Irish [?] which he has to meet with, or a disposition to find fault at all events, cause or no cause. My experience in this business has been short, but still long enough to teach me that an officer who has the small number of 300 men to provide for and to control, has got a large contract on his hands, and I am convinced that many who never saw an army, but who are constantly finding fault with the management of officers might find it greatly to their advantage to get the benefit of a little actual knowledge of such matters before judging of the conduct of others, as severely as many do.
                          Tomorrow we start for Council Bluffs, which place we expect to reach in about eight days. Will endeavor to let you hear from us when we arrive there. Till then adieu.
                          Respectfully,
                          S. N. Pierce.
                          Published November 29, 1861

                          Wilson S. Maxwell, age 29, died at Des Moines, the first of only two members of the battalion to die during their term of service. He is buried in Northfield Cemetery, Des Moines County, Iowa.

                          Wilson Maxwell.jpg
                          Bob Welch

                          The Eagle and The Journal
                          My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                            November 12, 1861

                            Wieneke: Started at 9 oc[lock] and traveled 14 miles and camped for the night Weather verry fine all day such weather is verry pleasant Camping out if it only stays so until we get to the fort I feel better this eve than I ever have since leaving the City

                            Cherry: Teusday, 12th. Resumed the march this morning at nine Oclock and marched sixteen miles. To day we received only about half rations and Co. B again refused to march in ranks and fell out at every house to obtain the necessairies of life and subsistance for the march and our evenings meal. We are now in camp now as I am wrighting some are singing others dancing some playing the violin some the clarenot and some the Gituar others playing some of their favourite plays and amusemints which gives the camp a cheerfull appearance. To night G. B. Zimmerman and Samuel Kirk are on the sick list but they are neither of them very bad and will probaly be better soon. I forgot to notice in the proper place that we came very near stacking arms and refuseing to march out of De Moin but our Capt got to hear of it and when our company was paraded for roll call he came out and talked to us about it. He did not say you must do so and so but merely advised us to keep up the reputation of the company and to show the others that if Pattee was mean enough to cheat us we was brave enough to stand it without a murmur and he talked us right out of it and we broke ranks with shouts and laughter. We was not base enough to show any disrespect to our beloved Old Captain and when our Captain joined us at Newton he was received as a lot of children would receive their Parrent. When we saw him cumming the company fell in and came to a present arms and after he had returned the salute we gave . nine cheres for Capt B Mahanna

                            Map so Far.png
                            Bob Welch

                            The Eagle and The Journal
                            My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Primary Accounts Thread

                              November 13, 1861

                              Wieneke: Wednesday Nov 13 Camp No 11 Marched 22 miles and waded Skunk River [sic. Raccoon] Camped on west Bank went ahead today and Bought 1 ˝ Bushel potatoes they are verry scarce the farmers say the season was too dry the Country was verry pleasant and fine today large farms and good houses passed through Adel 11 miles from last nights camp and Irish town is on the other side of Skunk from our camp

                              Cherry: Wednesday, 13th. Resumed the march this morning at seven Oclock and marched twenty one miles and encamped on Coon River near the town of Reeding in Dallas County. At this place the men was obliged to waid the river the Bridg being gone. I did not wade the river and was determined not to go through the cold watter for it was as cold as ice. I waited until a waggon came along and then rode over on that. Many of the boys that wadded the river was sick for two or three days afterward. Reeding is a small town of about 200 inhabatants and is mostly Irish people. While we was encamped here the Ladies visited us and sang some very pretty songs. We again sang the Happy Land of Canmain. It was new to them and was cheered by all pressent. We passed through Adell the county seat of Dallas County. It is the finest little town we passed through on our whole march. They have the finest court house I ever saw. Its population is about 500.

                              [Current town of Redfield, IA]

                              Map so Far.png
                              Bob Welch

                              The Eagle and The Journal
                              My blog, following one Illinois community from Lincoln's election through the end of the Civil War through the articles originally printed in its two newspapers.

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