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Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

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  • Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018



    Who:
    The Bully Boys Mess, in conjunction with the 24th Missouri will be recreating the 12th KS Infantry.

    What/Where: The Bully Boys Mess, in conjunction with the 24th Missouri are hosting an EBUFU immersive event set at Fort Larned, KS. Located 7 miles from Larned, KS with no modern structures in sight of the parade grounds and the buildings nearly 100% restored to 1860s conditions, Fort Larned offers a truly isolated, unique experience that is hard to beat.

    The Bully Boys Mess are raising 3 initial companies, with a 4th added as needed. The overall commander will be Dom Dal Bello as Colonel with his staff TBD. Company A to be comprised of the 24th Missouri, Company B of Holmes Brigade, and Company C TBD shortly. Company D will be raised if the caps are met for Companies A-C.

    Field Music is currently being discussed with Kelly Ford.

    When: October 19-21, 2018

    Registration: Registration will open in Spring of 2018 and the amount is TBD. Registration will include all meals for the weekend; you will not have to bring anything with you. Any funds left over from registration will be donated to Fort Larned for preservation of their buildings and grounds. Please use the following Facebook Page for updates and information: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS 1863 - CLICK HERE FOR THE FACEBOOK PAGE.

    Guiding Impression, 12th KS Infantry:

    The guiding impression for this event will be 12th Kansas Volunteer Infantry. This unit was assigned to Fort Larned at various times in 1863 as part of the Department of Missouri, District of Kansas (District of the Frontier). Their primary mission of the men of Fort Larned was to guard the Santa Fe Trail.

    “From 1821 to 1880 the Santa Fe Trail was one of America’s most important overland routes. It carried several million dollars per year in commercial traffic between Independence, Missouri and Santa Fe. The acquisition of the vast new territories by the United States after the War with Mexico, and gold rushes of 1849 and 1858, further boosted the Trail traffic. Inevitably the influx of merchants, gold seekers, and adventures disrupted the Indians’ way of life. Believing their existence in jeopardy the tribes struck back, attacking the commerce, mail shipments, and travelers on the Trail"

    To counter such attacks the army set up a military post on October 22 1859, west of Lookout (now Jenkins Hill) on the bank of the Pawnee River about five miles from where it joins the Arkansas river. Called “Camp on Pawnee Fork” at first, it soon became “Camp Alert.” In June 1860 the camp was moved farther west, where a more durable sod-and adobe fort was built and named for Col. Benjamin F. Larned, US Paymaster-General (1854-62)

    ….Most of Fort Larned’s buildings were poorly built then and not adequate to withstand large-scale Indian war that many high-ranking officers predicted. Fund for construction were finally appropriated in 1866, and the fort’s garrison began an extensive building program. By winter of 1868 the adobe structures were gone replaced by nine new stone and timber buildings around the parade ground”

    UNIFORM GUIDELINES

    Headgear: Based upon initial research, most original photos show a mixture of forage caps and civilian style hats. These will be the primary impression items with a focus on those types over Hardee hats.

    Forage Cap
    Civilian Hat
    Hardee Hat

    Shirt:

    Contract Issue Flannel Shirt
    Domet Flannel Shirt
    Civilian Shirt

    Drawers:

    Army Issue Drawers of Canton flannel
    Civilian Drawers
    US Sanitary Commission Drawers

    Jacket: Based upon surviving original photographs at the time of unit at Fort Larned, the sack coat was the most common jacket type, followed by a type of state jacket with no epaluets, and 9 button fronts. These will be accepted, but in limited quantities.

    Sack Coat
    Infantry Jacket - See notes above
    Frock Coat

    Trousers:

    Sky Blue Foot Pattern Trousers

    Socks:

    Socks of 19th Century Pattern

    Braces:

    19th Century Pattern Suspenders
    Period Waist Belt

    Boots:

    Brogans
    Army Boots
    Civilian Boots

    Field Gear:

    1848-1861 Cartridge Box and Cap Box
    Two Rivet or Seven Gaylord Scabbard
    1857 Belt with Leather Keeper or no Keeper
    1858 Tarred Haversack
    1858 Smooth side Canteen with Leather or Linen Strap/ Hemp or string Keeper
    1855 Double Bag Knapsack or Blanket Roll
    US Issue Blanket
    Civilian Blanket or Coverlet
    Gum Blanket
    Extra Shirt, Socks, Personal Items of period documentation

    Weapons:

    Import Smoothbore Muskets of .69 or .70
    1841 Springfield
    1842 Springfield
    1861 Springfield and 1853 Enfield permitted

    Mess Furniture:

    Tin Plate or Canteen Half, Cup and Utensils required. This is an encampment event.

    Penknives, watches, jewelry, etc. must be of period style. "Comfort items," such as camp hats, balaclavas, scarves, mittens, gloves permitted. NO MODERN EYEWEAR. Period personal hygiene items permitted. Prescription medications/contact lens care items should be concealed in period containers. Smoking items permitted, except for modern cigarettes.
    Last edited by Eric Tipton; 04-09-2017, 09:17 PM.
    Tyler Heusinkveld

    18th/19th Century Apprentice Tailor
    Member of:
    24th Missouri
    Bully Boys Mess
    Carolinas Militia Company
    Founding Member - Civil War Period Tailors FB Page

    "Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling."

    --Abraham Lincoln, November 20, 1860 Remarks at Springfield, Illinois

  • #2
    Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

    Awesome, looking so forward to this event.
    Frank Siltman
    24th Mo Vol Inf
    Cannoneer, US Army FA Museum Gun Crew
    Member, Oklahoma Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission
    Company of Military Historians
    Lawton/Fort Sill, OK

    Pacifism is a shifty doctrine under which a man accepts the benefits of the social group without being willing to pay -- and claims a halo for his dishonesty. Robert A. Heinlein

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

      The Hairy Nation Boys are honored to be enlisting stalwart Union men for Co. C. Please contact myself or Nation Hellwig if you are interested falling in with us.
      Mike Palada
      aka Lemuel Ellington, Hairy Nation Boys

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

        The website is up and running. FORT LARNED EVENT. You can pre-register if you want, but when registration opens in the spring of 2018, you will have to submit payment at that time to complete the registration process when the total registration cost is determined. Looking forward to making this a bully event for everyone.
        Tyler Heusinkveld

        18th/19th Century Apprentice Tailor
        Member of:
        24th Missouri
        Bully Boys Mess
        Carolinas Militia Company
        Founding Member - Civil War Period Tailors FB Page

        "Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling."

        --Abraham Lincoln, November 20, 1860 Remarks at Springfield, Illinois

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

          For a second I was like, "Why is this right after Wauhatchie?!??!?!?!?!" And then I saw that it was for next year.
          This is only 13 hours away from me. It's so close compared to what I'm used to. Count me in!
          Kenny Pavia
          24th Missouri Infantry

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

            "1857 Belt with Leather Keeper or no Keeper:

            Not understanding why this designation of belt, given the time period?
            Kevin Dally

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

              Originally posted by Pritchett Ball View Post
              "1857 Belt with Leather Keeper or no Keeper:

              Not understanding why this designation of belt, given the time period?
              I got this great response to my question...

              Kevin
              A couple of months back you asked a question on the event Facebook page why the guiding impression called out a waist belt with leather keepers or with leather keepers removed. I responded we were in the process of refining our impression via research and here’s what we found and the decision we made.

              We were able to obtain the “Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-67, 1870-76” found in the National Archives in Washington D.C. The records for Company H, 12th Kansas Infantry reflected the company had been issued 75 “Waist belts, Privates”. Obviously that doesn’t provide any specific insight as to what type of keeper was utilized on these waist belts.

              I decide to further research waist belts in the 2nd edition of “The Columbia Rifles Research Compendium” which I’m sure you know is an excellent source for material culture research of the Federal Infantry Soldier. There is chapter dedicated to “Waist belts for Infantry Privates” on page 134 of the compendium a section discusses the topic of waist belt keepers. It sites a collector and author, Paul Johnson whom, “places the introduction of the brass keeper around the 2nd quarter of 1863, the 1862 Ordnance Manual still specified a leather keeper”. The compendium author asserts, “With this in mind, reproduction belts should probably have no brass keepers if the scenario is prior to the first Quarter of 1863. Furthermore, they should not be present in any great quantity for the remained of 1863 as well, since production had just started and there is always a time lag between the introduction and the general usage of any military equipment”

              Company H was issued their accoutrements when they muster into Federal Service at Paola, Kansas in October 1862. They were posted to Fort Larned from May to December 1863, which is the time frame we are portraying for the event. After digesting this information we decided that waist belts with a leather keeper still seem most appropriate for our guiding impression. Now that is not to say it wasn’t possible that some soldiers may have had brass keepers on their waist belts. I’m sure we all agree equipment wears out and needs to be replaced continually. As Ft. Larned’s quartermaster supplies flowed from the larger Forts of Leavenworth and Riley which were huge supply points for the frontier army, I would imagine their might be a “sprinkling” of brass keepers but, we believe leather keepers being more “typical” or “common” for a majority of the company. Having said that, I think if your waist belt has a brass keeper wearing it would not be a problem.

              I hope this answers your question. We are still refining the impression and will publish it on the FB event page hopefully soon. We hope this will be a quality event at a quality location and we are glad you are excited about it. If you have any question please don’t hesitate to let us know.

              Thanks Kevin
              Jim Scheidel

              I love getting detailed answer's like this that I (and others) can learn from!

              I was under the impression that the brass leather keeper was a pre-war design, didn't know it was a during the war feature. Am most happy with Jim's answer!
              Kevin Dally

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

                Looking forward to joining y'all for this event!
                Pvt. K.R. Malcolm
                Co. H, 8th USI

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

                  REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR GUARDIANS OF THE SANTA FE TRAIL!!!

                  Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1900961283463945/

                  Registration page: https://theusinkveld5.wixsite.com/fortlarned
                  Tyler Heusinkveld

                  18th/19th Century Apprentice Tailor
                  Member of:
                  24th Missouri
                  Bully Boys Mess
                  Carolinas Militia Company
                  Founding Member - Civil War Period Tailors FB Page

                  "Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling."

                  --Abraham Lincoln, November 20, 1860 Remarks at Springfield, Illinois

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

                    Guardians of the Santa Fe Trail 1863 19-20 Oct 2018
                    Guiding Impression
                    The guiding impression for this event will be Company H, 12th Kansas Volunteer Infantry. Company H of the 12th Kansas was assigned to Fort Larned from May-Dec 1863 as part of the Department of Missouri, District of Kansas (District of the Frontier). Taking over the primary mission of the Fort from recently departed Regular Army troops sent back east to participate in the conflict ragging there, these men were “Guardians of the Santa Fe Trail”. May to December 1863 was a period of heighten tensions between the native tribes of the area and the soldiers garrisoned at Fort Larned.

                    UNIFORM & EQUIPMENT GUIDELINES:
                    Uniform, weapons, and accoutrement guidelines for this event are based on the research conducted utilizing the original “Clothing Record Book of Company H, 12th Kansas Infantry” found in the Kansas State Archives and the “Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores on Hand in Regular and Volunteer Army Organizations, 1862-67, 1870-76” found in the National Archives in Washington D.C.

                    The Clothing Record Book revealed Company H was very well uniformed having been issued three different uniform coats. A “Dress Coat” (Frock coat), “Infantry Jacket” (Shell jacket) and a “blouse” (sack coat). As we are portraying a company in garrison on the frontier we will ask participants to bring a sack coat for fatigue duty and drill and an Infantry Frockcoat for retreat and dress parades. The NHS has a number of Frockcoat that maybe barrowed up to size 46. If you don’t have a frock or you are larger than a size 46 a sack coats for parade is permissible.

                    The Clothing Record book revealed company H was issued a “Company Hat with feather and trimmings” just prior to their posting at Fort Larned. If you have a Hardee Hat please bring it, again the NHS has a number of Hardee hats up to size 7 3/8 that maybe barrowed. If you don’t have a Hardee or wear a size larger than 7 3/8 a forge cap for parade is permissible.

                    The Summary Statements of Quarterly Returns of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores revealed Company was issued Enfield rifled muskets. Cartridge Boxes where issued without “Cartridge Box belts”, as such boxes would have to have been worn on the waist belt.


                    Headgear:
                    Forage Cap
                    Hardee Hat with Eagle, Feather and trimmings (For Dress Parade)

                    Shirt:
                    Contract Issue Flannel Shirt
                    Domet Flannel Shirt
                    Civilian Shirt

                    Drawers:
                    Army Issue Drawers of Canton flannel
                    Civilian Drawers
                    US Sanitary Commission Drawers

                    Jackets:
                    Sack Coat
                    Frock Coat for (Dress parade)

                    Coat:
                    Infantry Pattern, Great Coat, Sky Blue

                    Trousers:
                    Sky Blue Foot Pattern Trousers

                    Socks:
                    Socks of 19th Century Pattern

                    Braces:
                    19th Century Pattern Suspenders

                    Shoes/Shoes:
                    Army Bootee
                    Army Boots (NCO’s only)

                    Accoutrements:
                    M1861 Cartridge Box, Elongated Ball, .58 Caliber with Box plates, without sling, box attached to waist belt.
                    Waist Belt, Privates with leather keepers or with keepers removed
                    Cap Pouch 1850 model variant or shield type
                    NCO waist belts and keepers (NCO’s/ Musicians only)
                    Bayonet Scabbard Two Rivet with Bayonet

                    Field Gear:
                    1858 Tarred Haversack
                    1858 Smooth side canteen with leather or Linen Strap/ Hemp or string Keeper
                    1855 Double Bag Knapsack
                    1 or 2 US Issue Blanket
                    Gum Blanket
                    Extra Shirt, Socks, Personal Items of period documentation

                    Weapons:
                    1853 Enfield (Preferred)
                    1861 Springfield (Accepted)

                    Sword:
                    1840 NCO Sword (NCO’s only)
                    1840 Musicians Sword (Musicians only)
                    With NCO, Musicians’ sword belts and plates

                    Mess Furniture:
                    Tin Plate or Canteen Half, Cup and Utensils.

                    Penknives, watches, jewelry, etc. must be of period style. "Comfort items," such as camp hats, balaclavas, scarves, mittens, gloves permitted. NO MODERN EYEWEAR. Period personal hygiene items permitted. Prescription medications/contact lens care items should be concealed in period containers. Smoking items permitted, except for modern cigarettes.

                    Civilian clothing standards for
                    “Guarding The Santa Fe Trail – 1863”
                    Women
                    All clothing must be made according to period construction techniques and patterns. At a minimum, all Buttonholes need to be hand done.
                    1. Female Civilians are required to wear a period correct dress made of cotton, wool, silk, or linen. Please keep in mind age appropriate styles, no blouse/skirt/jacket combinations unless you are a child or teenager. White collars and cuffs or neckerchiefs need to be worn.

                    2. Underclothing correct to the period including a corset or stays is required. This includes chemise, under petticoats, hoop or corded petticoat, drawers (depending on age). Stockings may be wool or cotton. Keep in mind that drawers may not be worn by some women depending on age, and social standing.

                    3. Aprons of a period correct fabric (cotton, wool, or linen) and period construction are highly encouraged. An apron is a key element in a working impression. An apron may not be needed by women of a higher social economic class, but a fancy silk apron may be worn to serve lunch or tea.

                    4. Shoes or boots of a period style with all leather soles and made of leather and correct materials are required.

                    5. Head covers such as slat bonnets, corded bonnets, quilted bonnets, or fashion bonnets are encouraged. Be sure to pick a style that is appropriate to your age and social economic status.

                    6. Hair must be worn in a period correct style. Generally it is to be parted in the center, no bangs, and confined at or below the nape of the neck. Hairnets may be worn if made of correct materials and are appropriate to your first person portrayal. No Snoods.

                    7. Eyewear must be correct to the time period or to an earlier period. Contact lenses are permitted. No modern eye wear is allowed.

                    8. Outerwear must be made with correct construction and patterns to the time period. Outerwear includes but is not limited to jackets, shawls, mantels, sontags, saques, and capes.

                    9. Accessories such as gloves, parasols and jewelry must be period in style and construction. Jewelry can be limited and simplistic, or elaborate and fancy in style, whichever is appropriate to the economic status of your persona. Gloves typically would be of black or brown leather.

                    Men
                    NO MILITARY UNIFORMS CAN BE WORN BY CIVILIAN MALES.
                    All clothing must be made according to period construction techniques and patterns. All Buttonholes need to be hand done.
                    1. A suit of clothes that can include a coat, vest/waistcoat, over shirt and trousers is required. The cloth should be of period materials appropriate to the garment type and socio economic level of the wearer. Garments can be made of wool, cotton, silk, linen or period blends such as jean cloth and linsey. Frock, Paletot, Tail, Sack and Roundabout coats are all acceptable patterns. Suitable weaves for coats, vests and trousers include broadcloth, cassimere, satinette and kersey. Over shirts are commonly made with flannel or drill.

                    2. Outerwear such as capes and overcoats are encouraged. These outer garments are to be of period construction and materials appropriate to the social economic status of the wearer.

                    3. Buttons should be made with period materials: shell, glass, china or bone buttons on shirts; bone or tin buttons on pants; 1851 patent hard rubber buttons, cloth or “coin” buttons on coats.

                    4. Shirts should be made of cotton, wool, or appropriate blends. Shirts made of woven checks and stripes, appropriate cotton prints, or solid colors. Most often, well to do and aspiring men would wear white shirts, but documented shirts made of patterned or printed material are acceptable.

                    5. Suspenders must be of correct construction, no “Y” backs.

                    6. Neckwear of correct pattern and materials appropriate to the socio economic status of the wearer are encouraged. If tied, please ensure they are tied correctly. Pre-tied Cravats or “Cheater” ties did exist and documented styles are acceptable.

                    7. Shoes, bootees or boots with all leather soles and made of leather and correct materials are required.

                    8. Eyewear must be correct to the time period or to an earlier period. Contact lenses are permitted. No modern eye wear is allowed.

                    9. Underclothing that is period appropriate and made of correct material is encouraged. No visible modern underwear.

                    10. Hats of straw or felt that are properly blocked or caps are required and should be worn outdoors.

                    11. Head and facial hair must be worn in a period correct style.

                    12. Accessories such as gloves, canes, pocket watches, satchels and wallets should be of documented styles and construction. Modern items such as wrist watches are not to be worn or visible during the event.


                    Children

                    CHILDREN’S CLOTHING NEEDS TO BE IN THE SAME SOCIAL ECONOMICAL CLASS AS THEIR PARENTS.
                    Prints (documented to the period) and plaids in cotton, wool or linen are appropriate for children of all ages. White outfits may be appropriate for very small babies.
                    Girls
                    1. Dresses with open necklines (bateau) are very common in warmer weather. High necklines (jewel) may be worn, as well as necklines between the two extremes. Dresses should be back fastening. Zouave jackets, white blouse with dark skirts maybe worn by upper class girls and teenagers.
                    2. Dresses for teenage girls may follow the guidelines of adult women except in regards to hemlines.
                    a. 13-14 years old hemmed at mid-calf
                    b. 14-15 years old hemmed to lower calf to mid shin
                    c. 15-18 years old hemmed within a hand span of the ankle bone
                    d. 17- 20 or married women hemmed at adult women’s length.

                    3. Young women less than 16 years old should be wearing back fastening bodices with appropriate supportive undergarments for their figure.
                    4. Girls should wear drawers, petticoats and chemises under their dresses. Corded petticoats or small hoops are acceptable for all girls who are walking.
                    5. Slat bonnets, corded bonnets, fashion bonnets, quilted bonnets or hats are appropriate for girls and small children.
                    6. Pinafores or smocks in period correct fabric maybe worn, this allows the children to play and get dirty.
                    Boys
                    1. Trousers with a shirt, coat and hat or cap are appropriate for boys of all socio economical status. The materials would be dictated by their parent’s socio economic status.
                    2. Boys that have not been toilet trained are to be dressed in frocks or smocks and petticoats. These same frocks and smocks maybe wore over trousers for toilet trained boys.
                    Jim Scheidel
                    Andover, Kansas
                    24th Missouri Volunteer Infantry
                    www.24thmissouri.org

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Guarding the Santa Fe - Fort Larned, KS, 1863. Event: Oct 19-21, 2018

                      Registration ends/closes September 19th. Get your registrations in!
                      Tyler Heusinkveld

                      18th/19th Century Apprentice Tailor
                      Member of:
                      24th Missouri
                      Bully Boys Mess
                      Carolinas Militia Company
                      Founding Member - Civil War Period Tailors FB Page

                      "Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling."

                      --Abraham Lincoln, November 20, 1860 Remarks at Springfield, Illinois

                      Comment

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