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  • Knapsacks & Blanket Rolls Redeux

    I have a recipe for making the chemical to paint onto the canvas/ducking. I am in need of dimensions for making an oilcloth. Also recomendations as to what kind of grommets to put onto one of the oilcloths I am making. I want to do this right. Please Help.

    Full name on every post. We do not allow anonymous or unsigned post on the AC Forums. John Stillwagon, Forum Moderator
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    Last edited by Yellowhammer; 05-17-2004, 05:34 PM.
    Paul B. Boulden Jr.


    RAH VA MIL '04
    (Loblolly Mess)
    [URL="http://23rdva.netfirms.com/welcome.htm"]23rd VA Vol. Regt.[/URL]
    [URL="http://www.virginiaregiment.org/The_Virginia_Regiment/Home.html"]Waggoner's Company of the Virginia Regiment [/URL]

    [URL="http://www.military-historians.org/"]Company of Military Historians[/URL]
    [URL="http://www.moc.org/site/PageServer"]Museum of the Confederacy[/URL]
    [URL="http://www.historicsandusky.org/index.html"]Historic Sandusky [/URL]

    Inscription Capt. Archibold Willet headstone:

    "A span is all that we can boast, An inch or two of time, Man is but vanity and dust, In all his flower and prime."

  • #2
    Re: Oilcloth Dimensions

    Originally posted by Stonewall_Greyfox
    I have a recipe for making the chemical to paint onto the canvas/ducking. I am in need of dimensions for making an oilcloth. Also recomendations as to what kind of grommets to put onto one of the oilcloths I am making. I want to do this right. Please Help.
    A safety comment here, I believe some of the traditional means of treating canvas use sources known to be hazardous in California (somebody else help me out here, I don't recall the specifics :( ) Personally, I wouldn't sleep overnight with my face close to one (when the average life span was less then fifty, many folks avoided cancer by dying!)

    Comment


    • #3
      Painted Cloth????

      I plan on making a run of painted oilcloth belts as well as oilcloth groundcloths. I have several recipees (period and non-period) and non-toxic. What I do not have yet is dimensioning. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Go to this link for recipee...

      http://www.geocities.com/union_guard...ccoutermen.htm

      Sincerely,

      Paul B. Boulden Jr.

      RAH VA MIL '04
      Last edited by Stonewall_Greyfox; 01-08-2004, 07:53 PM.
      Paul B. Boulden Jr.


      RAH VA MIL '04
      (Loblolly Mess)
      [URL="http://23rdva.netfirms.com/welcome.htm"]23rd VA Vol. Regt.[/URL]
      [URL="http://www.virginiaregiment.org/The_Virginia_Regiment/Home.html"]Waggoner's Company of the Virginia Regiment [/URL]

      [URL="http://www.military-historians.org/"]Company of Military Historians[/URL]
      [URL="http://www.moc.org/site/PageServer"]Museum of the Confederacy[/URL]
      [URL="http://www.historicsandusky.org/index.html"]Historic Sandusky [/URL]

      Inscription Capt. Archibold Willet headstone:

      "A span is all that we can boast, An inch or two of time, Man is but vanity and dust, In all his flower and prime."

      Comment


      • #4
        What exactly is a "comfort"?

        Pulled this from a letter in "Army Life of an Illinois Soldier", the letters of Pvt. Charles Wills, 8th Illinois.

        He writes:

        Bird's Point, MO., November 24, 1861
        "I'm in clover. I've got a great big "comfort," weighs a ton, that has been sent to my partner and myself from a young lady in Blooimington. We've tramped so much since I recieved that pair of blankets from you, and we never know when we start whether we're coming back here again or no, that being unable to carry them I sold them."

        I'm a little confused as to what a "comfort" might be. At first, I thought it might just be a large comfortable blanket, but at the same time, he states that it "weighs a ton" ... ? The regiment is in winter quarters, therefore I took it that it probably had something to do with staying warm.
        [SIZE="4"][B][COLOR=RoyalBlue]Eric Michael Burke[/COLOR][/B][/SIZE]
        [B][I][SIZE="2"][COLOR="SlateGray"]"BLACKJACK!"[/COLOR][/SIZE][/I][/B]
        [I][URL="http://www.saltriverrifles.com"]Salt River Rifles[/URL][/I]

        [URL="http://xvcorps.blogspot.com/"]Forty Rounds: Fifteenth Army Corps, 1862-1865[/URL], Blog Owner.

        [SIZE="1"][i][U][B][COLOR="DimGray"]In Proud Memorium:[/COLOR][/B][/U]
        [B]Pvt. James Swingler Chandler (3x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Co. H, 111th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
        [B]Pvt. John D. Linthicum (4x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Co. F, 118th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
        [B]Pvt. Martin Van Buren Straight (3x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Co. E, 23rd Missouri Volunteer Infantry
        [B]Cpl. Andreas Schoen (3x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Co. A, 30th Missouri Volunteer Infantry
        [B]Pvt. Madison Burke (3x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Battery B, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery
        [B]Pvt. Eli Bell (4x Great Grandfather)
        [/B]Co. C, 31st Alabama Infantry[/i][/SIZE]

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

          Eric,

          It's a scarf. I've also heard them referred to as "comforters."
          Jason R. Wickersty
          http://www.newblazingstarpress.com

          Received. “How now about the fifth and sixth guns?”
          Sent. “The sixth gun is the bully boy.”
          Received. “Can you give it any directions to make it more bully?”
          Sent. “Last shot was little to the right.”
          Received. “Fearfully hot here. Several men sunstruck. Bullets whiz like fun. Have ceased firing for awhile, the guns are so hot."

          - O.R.s, Series 1, Volume 26, Part 1, pg 86.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

            Can also be a tied quilt, or perhaps a whole cloth quilt (not pieced). As your soldier mentioned, they could get heavy, especially wet, so were preferred for home and hospital rather than on the march, where wool blankets were best.

            [Little Rock] Old-Line Democrat, January 5, 1860, p. 4, c. 3
            Cotton Laps! Cotton Laps!
            For making quilts and comforts, for sale very low, by Brugman & Co.
            Oct. 13, 1859.

            [Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, July 25, 1861, p. 2, c, 3
            An Appeal to the Women of Arkansas.
            It has been wisely suggested by a contemporary that the patriotic women of the country should knit socks for the volunteers.
            In addition to this we beg leave to call the attention of the true hearted women of the country to some other points.
            There will be, if the war continues, a scarcity of blankets, woolen cloth, flannel, etc. These our soldiers will need. As regards blankets, each family can spare some. Those who stay at home can use counterpanes and comforts. The latter are easily and cheaply made, are warm and will supply the places of blankets in the house.—.....

            [Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 22, 1861, p. 1, c.6
            Clothing for the Soldiers—Circular
            Letter from the Military Board.
            Office Military Board, } Little Rock, August 20, 1861. }
            . . . Blankets are greatly needed and are indispensable to the comfort of our soldiers. In many instances domestic blankets may be manufactured. In others they may be supplied by a division of the articles of that kind which families have provided for themselves. There is scarcely a house in the State in which there is not an excess of bed-clothing. It is not making too great a call on the patriotism of the county, at a time like this, to ask that the soldiers be supplied from this surplus and abundance. Where blankets cannot be supplied comforts may be substituted; but brankets [sic] are much preferred. . . .

            [Marshall] Texas Republican, August 24, 1861, p. 1, c. 5-6
            Letter from Virginia.
            Richmond, Va., August 6th, 1861.
            R. W. Loughery, Esq.,
            . . . Whatever may be our means to buy them—blankets are going to be hard to get for our soldiers next fall. Let me make a suggestion to our ladies. Every household has several blankets, cotton is plenty, and calico is comparatively cheap. Let our ladies go at once to manufacturing "comforts" for home use and send the blankets to the soldiers....

            Mobile Register and Advertiser, August 24, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
            Cotton Batting for Comforts.
            All persons wishing to make COMFORTS for Winter Covering, cam obtain COTTON BATTING for the same at the Rooms of the MILITARY AID SOCIETY, No. 75 North Conception, between State and Congress streets.
            Those who prefer to pay the Society for the BATTING, can do so, otherwise it will be furnished free of charge.
            aug11 1m AD. Chaudron, Secretary.

            Daily Chronicle & Sentinel [Augusta, Ga.], August 31, 1861, p. 2, c. 1-2
            Remember the Soldier.
            . . . The weather has recently been very wet in Virginia, and it is even now getting quite cool, especially in the mountains. And right now the soldiers need good blankets and flannel shirts almost as much as they every will. . . .
            It has been urged that as blankets are very scarce, if indeed it be possible to buy them at all, the people should give their own to the soldiers. We agree to this heartily, and when families can not afford to give them, let them sell their blankets. Every family can readily furnish from one to half a dozen, and use comforts, or something of that sort for themselves. Blankets are the only covering that will answer for the soldier in camp, and these ought to be lined with oil-cloth if possible. Comforts, sheets, coverlets and such like, should be contributed for hospital purposes, but the blankets alone for the soldiers in service. Remember the soldier, and provide liberally and fully for all the wants of those who are fighting for us who stay at home.

            Natchez Daily Courier, September 11, 1861, p. 1, c. 2
            The committee appointed by the ladies of Baton Rouge, La., to procure blankets for the use of the army, reported 700 as the result of their explorations within the limits of that city--besides many quilts and comforters which have been contributed.

            Natchez Daily Courier, September 17, 1861, p. 1, c. 1
            We learn that the Military Aid Society has shipped over 1000 lined blankets to the seat of war in Virginia, and that they have over one thousand yet on hand to line. They will be sent off as soon as they are made ready.
            Although our people have been liberal--extremely so--in supplying the societies with blankets, there are still more wanted. Bring them forth, and place comforts on your own beds in their stead. We would suggest to the ladies that cotton batting can be obtained at Jackson; a most excellent and convenient article for making comforts.

            The Southern Watchman [Athens, Ga.], September 18, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
            [left edge cut off, but gives dimensions for hospital shirts, short bed gowns, cotton drawers, comforts (42x78), pillow sacks, mattress sacks--can get copy from original???]

            Albany [Ga.] Patriot, November 14, 1861, p. 3, c. 1
            To the Ladies of the different Societies, and Also to the Ladies of Dougherty County, Generally.
            I have been requested by Capt. W. J. Lawton to set before you the wants of his Company, and not having the time and convenience to visit you at your homes, therefore take this method of informing you that I am authorized by Capt. Lawton to procure the materials for making up 85 comforters for his men. Blankets are too short and costly, and do not cover the wants of the soldiers--hence it was determined to have comforters made in their stead.--It was thought by us that osnaburgs would be the best material for making them, but I am informed through the ladies that calico is best. It shall therefore be left with them to choose the best goods for the purpose. Now a comforter should be six feet in length, and two breadths in width, less than that will not answer. Each and every lady wishing to engage in this noble work can procure the materials in Albany, having them charged to Capt. W. J. Lawton, who has given me the assurance that he will settle all such claims. It is needless for me to say more on the subject, for I feel assured that the [fold] fact that these things are absolutely wanted by the brave men who are enduring every thing for the protection of our homes and firesides, will be sufficient to engage the patriotic needle of every lady in Doughterty county.
            D. F. Bailey.


            [Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, August 6, 1862, p. 1, c. 6-7
            To the Ladies.
            Office, Medical Director, Trans Miss. Dist., }
            Little Rock, July 30th, 1862. }
            To promote the recovery of sick soldiers in Hospitals, they must have better and more cleanly bed clothing than the blankets used by them in camp. With this view, the undersigned earnestly solicits the ladies, every where throughout the district, to manufacture and send to Dr. Silverberg, Medical Purveyor at this place, the largest quantity possible, of Cotton Goods, suitable for Comforts and Sheets, the former to be dyed, as white is not a proper color. Reasonable prices will be paid promptly on delivery.
            James M. Keller,
            Aug. 6.


            Southern Confederacy [Atlanta, Ga.], November 1, 1862, p. 2, c. 2
            The Women! Their Unbounded Patriotism!
            The Chattanooga Rebel of the 30th says:
            We are authorized to state that the ladies of Chattanooga will use their surplus dresses in making comforts for the soldier, if they can get cotton. They are willing to pay for it if any person will furnish them what they want for this purpose. Will not the men furnish the cotton without requiring the ladies to pay for it?
            Now, wont somebody in Atlanta send a bale or two of cotton up to the ladies of Chattanooga, by Express, to-day?

            [Little Rock] Arkansas True Democrat, November 12, 1862, p. 1, c. 3
            Wanted—300 Bed Comforts for the use of the Army, for which a good price will be paid. The seller to furnish everything. For further particulars apply to E. Silverberg, Medical Purveyor, Little Rock, Ark.

            Vicki Betts
            vbetts@gower.net

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Painted Cloth

              I am no help on deminsions, but would like to know those period recepies.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                From Godey's Lady's Book, September 1857:

                Jason R. Wickersty
                http://www.newblazingstarpress.com

                Received. “How now about the fifth and sixth guns?”
                Sent. “The sixth gun is the bully boy.”
                Received. “Can you give it any directions to make it more bully?”
                Sent. “Last shot was little to the right.”
                Received. “Fearfully hot here. Several men sunstruck. Bullets whiz like fun. Have ceased firing for awhile, the guns are so hot."

                - O.R.s, Series 1, Volume 26, Part 1, pg 86.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                  Based on the internal references,i.e- It's heavy, meant for both him and his pard, and it's mention is followed by a discussion of the blankets he had sold -I think it's a pretty sure bet he is referring to a large thick quilt of some kind used on the bed.
                  Heck, In my neck of the woods the term comforter is still used to refere to a usually down filled bed cover used in winter.
                  Leland Hares, 10th Tennessee (U.S.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                    I don't know of any period references but I've been told the heavy blanket on my bed is a comfort, or comforter! Now this is totally modern, however it had to come from somewhere.

                    Roman Fox
                    Roman Fox

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                      Hah! Comforter ... never thought about that. Thanks guys!
                      [SIZE="4"][B][COLOR=RoyalBlue]Eric Michael Burke[/COLOR][/B][/SIZE]
                      [B][I][SIZE="2"][COLOR="SlateGray"]"BLACKJACK!"[/COLOR][/SIZE][/I][/B]
                      [I][URL="http://www.saltriverrifles.com"]Salt River Rifles[/URL][/I]

                      [URL="http://xvcorps.blogspot.com/"]Forty Rounds: Fifteenth Army Corps, 1862-1865[/URL], Blog Owner.

                      [SIZE="1"][i][U][B][COLOR="DimGray"]In Proud Memorium:[/COLOR][/B][/U]
                      [B]Pvt. James Swingler Chandler (3x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Co. H, 111th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
                      [B]Pvt. John D. Linthicum (4x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Co. F, 118th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
                      [B]Pvt. Martin Van Buren Straight (3x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Co. E, 23rd Missouri Volunteer Infantry
                      [B]Cpl. Andreas Schoen (3x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Co. A, 30th Missouri Volunteer Infantry
                      [B]Pvt. Madison Burke (3x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Battery B, 1st Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery
                      [B]Pvt. Eli Bell (4x Great Grandfather)
                      [/B]Co. C, 31st Alabama Infantry[/i][/SIZE]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                        "Comforter" is pretty common in the MidWest. Is it a Southern term also?

                        Thunderation. This could open up a whole discussion of regional expressions. Which would be interesting.

                        If anyone is interested in starting a new thread on that topic, please do. Regional American idioms are supposed to be quickly vanishing.
                        Fred Grogan
                        Sykes' Regulars

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                          I would call 10 mil in the bank a comfort but I am sure it refers to cotton blankets stuffed with insulation. Here are few references Vicky didn't post...

                          TEXAS REPUBLICAN [Marshall, TX] September 21, 1861, p. 2, c. 1

                          We hope that every family in Harrison county will contribute every blanket they can spare to our noble, self-sacrificing, brave volunteers. Supply their places with comforts, and send in the blankets without delay. Winter is nearly upon us, and our soldiers are stationed in rigorous latitudes, where they will need every blanket we can send them. It will never do for those at home to be surrounded with every comfort, and our friends abroad, engaged in the defense of all that we hold dear, to be suffering. Let us make them feel that our hearts are with them and the glorious cause which they are defending, and that all that we possess is at the service of our country.

                          TEXAS REPUBLICAN [Marshall, TX], November 8, 1862, p. 1, c. 5

                          A lady of this place sends us the following welcome communication: Who Will Help?

                          Our soldiers are sadly in need of blankets, or something to shield them from the severity of the coming winter. I can furnish material for several comforts, but need the cotton. If some of the planters will furnish this, (and a few pounds from your ten, twenty, fifty, or hundred bales would not be missed) much might be done to relieve the sufferings of our brave soldiers during the approaching winter. Everybody keeps a scrap bag, and from their contents, much could be put into use in this way. Besides this, old calico or worsted dresses, cloth, linsey, old sheets, or domestic of any kind, can be manufactured into comforts, which when quilted will last at least during one winter. In your lumber rooms and closets, being destroyed by moth, there is much which your dexterous fingers could fashion into a comfort. No matter if faded and ugly, they will do. If too light, from the wood materials for dying can be procured, and garments too much worn for other use will answer the purpose well. The work to make them is trifling—four ladies can complete three in a day; and where so much might be done, it is not our privilege, as well as our duty to work with willing hearts and hands.

                          Who will furnish the cotton? It can be left at almost any public house in town, convenient to all who are willing to aid. I will undertake to make six at east to begin with, and hope that everybody will aid in the cause, and we may soon have a supply sufficient for the comfort of our soldiers, who will be subject to almost every exposure of winter. Already the severity of the cold is telling upon the health of our thinly-clad troops in Virginia, Kentucky, and Arkansas, many of whom have not a blanket to cover them, when they seek the cold hard earth for rest, after days of marching and toil. Who will, or rather who will not help? Let everybody go to work with a will, and while we repose upon downy beds at home, the brave volunteer will bless us as he wraps his weary limbs our hands have furnished, and feel that though exiled he is still remembered, still cherished. All are our brothers and friends. Who would not labor to alleviate the sufferings or promote the happiness and welfare of a brother?

                          H. A. P.
                          __________________________________________________ ______________

                          Vicky, the Natchez Daily Courier is not a paper I have read. Do you remember anything in that one about the Texas troops in Virginia?


                          Va-Yank, for Southern word usage, a source I find useful is the http://docsouth.unc.edu website. Just do a key word search and you can see just how prevalent a word or phrase was in the 19th century south.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                            Most parts of the country call a down or cotton filled blanket a "comforter" which is long for "comfort." It's an insulation thing - makes em warmer...but a royal pain when it rains. Would love to see photos of an original.
                            Soli Deo Gloria
                            Doug Cooper

                            "The past is never dead. It's not even past." William Faulkner

                            Please support the CWT at www.civilwar.org

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: What exactly is a "comfort"?

                              Kevin--

                              Right off hand, I don't recall anything about Texas troops in Virginia in the Natchez Daily Courier, but I'm mostly looking for civilian information, or military material culture stuff (blankets, shoes, pharmaceuticals, flags, etc.). And I confess, I'm not as thorough on information out of Virginia because I figure other people are covering Virginia in great detail. I'll pick up more Western Theatre information, and *much* more Trans-Mississippi stuff, because I figure it's more likely to have been overlooked.

                              Vicki Betts
                              vbetts@gower.net

                              Comment

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