Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

    Originally posted by markj
    If you want to see a man wearing a typical early-war Indiana-issue uniform, go this URL and scroll down to "Philander Wisehart" (bottom row, far left). Wisehart served in the 8th IVI and was KIA at Rich Mountain so the image dates to early June 1861 (the 8th and 10th IVI's deployed to Western Virginia on 19 June).
    Mark:

    The URL seems to be missing. I'd like to take a look at the soldier you are talking about. Being early war, the impression is going to be interesting to figure out.
    Eric Tipton
    AC Owner
    Founding Member, Mess No. 1
    Cincinnati, Ohio

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

      Try this link:

      http://www.civilwarindiana.com/soldiers/reg008.html

      Then just scroll down to "Philander Wisehart" (he's at the very bottom on the far left).

      I also have extensive information about early-war uniform, equipment, and arms issues to the Indiana regiments that were deployed to Western Virginia (much of which does not appear in Todd's Military Equipage).

      Regards,

      Mark Jaeger
      Regards,

      Mark Jaeger

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

        I decided to take a look at the 19th OVI. At this time in the war they were still a 3 month Regiment. Else where in the forum it does mention for armaments: 600(+) Pondir Muskets .69 Calibre, and 200 Enfields. See Ohio Arms Part 1, in the Forum Index.

        I will look through our historical society images to see what is available. I do like the image that Mark mentioned. Mark do you have any details on the Jacket that is shown in the picture.

        Just as a side note: We have in our Museum Collection one of the Enfields from Company A, 19th OVI.
        Todd Morris

        Proprietor, Morris & Company Historical Clothiers

        http://morrisclothiers.com

        Canton Lodge #60 F&AM Canton, Ohio


        In Memorium: Pvt. Simon Morris, Co. G, 78th OVI Died: April 14, 1863 Jefferson Barracks, Missouri
        Joseph Rezin Thompson, 1st W.Va. Light Artillery
        Azville W. Lindsey, Co. G, 12th W.Va. Volunteer Infantry

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

          Originally posted by Canton Zouave
          I decided to take a look at the 19th OVI. At this time in the war they were still a 3 month Regiment. Else where in the forum it does mention for armaments: 600(+) Pondir Muskets .69 Calibre, and 200 Enfields. See Ohio Arms Part 1, in the Forum Index.

          I will look through our historical society images to see what is available. I do like the image that Mark mentioned. Mark do you have any details on the Jacket that is shown in the picture.

          Just as a side note: We have in our Museum Collection one of the Enfields from Company A, 19th OVI.
          Yep, I sure do. To wit:

          Indianapolis Daily Sentinel, 26 April 1861:

          QUARTER-MASTER GEN. DEPAR'T.,‎
          INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 25, 1861‎

          PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THIS DEPARTMENT until Monday evening, the 29th ‎inst., at six o'clock P. M. for furnishing the following articles for the use of the six regiments ‎now mustered into the service of the United States., viz:‎

          Coat and pants of strong, cheap woolen goods. Samples of materials to accompany ‎proposition.‎
          Two (2) Flannel Shirts.‎
          Two (2) Pairs Cotton Drawers.‎
          Two (2) " Wool Socks.‎
          Two (2) " High-quarter Shoes.‎

          Samples to accompany propositions.‎
          Also, one Felt Hat or Woolen Cap. Samples to accompany propositions.‎
          Also, four thousand seven hundred (4,700) pairs of Grey Blankets, of about 6 lbs. in ‎weight, and the usual army size. Samples to accompany propositions.‎
          Each bidder will specify the number of the above articles he can furnish, and the time ‎within which he can deliver them. The early delivery will be an inducement in awarding the ‎contract.‎
          Specifications in detail will be embraced in each contract, and the articles will be subject ‎to inspection under the contract before being received.‎
          The above propositions will be sealed and marked, "Proposals for Clothing," and be ‎directed to the Quarter-master General of Indiana Militia, City Quarters, Indianapolis.‎
          T. A. Morris, Q. M. Gen.‎

          Cin. Times, Daily Enquirer, Daily Commercial, and Daily Gazette copy one time and ‎send bill to this office.‎

          apr. [26]‎

          [same date and paper]

          QUARTER-MASTER GEN. DEPAR'T.,‎
          INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 25, 1861‎

          PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THIS DEPARTMENT until Monday evening, the 29th ‎inst., at six o'clock P. M. for furnishing the following accoutrements, according to patterns to be ‎exhibited at this office, viz:‎

          ‎4,000 Cartridge Boxes.‎
          ‎4,000 Cap Boxes.‎
          ‎4,000 Belts and Plates.‎
          ‎4,000 Bayonet Scabbards.‎

          Each proposition must state the number of the above articles that he can furnish, and the ‎time within which he can deliver them. The early delivery will be an inducement in awarding ‎the contract.‎
          The above propositions will be sealed and marked "Proposals for Accoutrements," and be ‎directed to the Quarter-master General of Indiana Militia, City Quarters, Indianapolis.‎
          T. A. MORRIS, Q. M. Gen.‎

          Cin. Times, Daily Enquirer, Daily Commercial, and Daily Gazette copy one time and send bill to ‎this office.‎

          apr. 26‎

          Indianapolis Daily Sentinel, 3 May 1861:

          ‎3 May 1861:‎

          UNIFORMING TROOPS.--The Quartermaster General yesterday [Thursday, 2 May] awarded ‎contracts for uniforms their six regiments as follows:‎

          Two regiments to Glaser & Brothers. Suits to consist of jacket and pants, of cadet ‎satinett, at $7 90 per suit.‎

          J. W. Geisendorff & Co., one regiment. Jeans jackets and pants at $6 50 per suit.‎

          Merritt & Coughlin and E. A. Hall, one regiment. Jeans jackets and pants at $7 00 per ‎suit.‎

          S. J. Smith, Arthur Orr and B. N. Lanham, of Madison [Indiana], one regiment. Grey ‎satinett, at $6 75 per suit.‎

          ‎(Suits for the 11th regiment have been contracted for by Col. Wallace some days since.)‎

          Contracts for flannel shirts and cotton drawers for five regiments were awarded to Glaser ‎& Brothers. Shirts at $1 40 each; drill drawers at 40 cents each.‎

          Nearly the entire contract for shoes was awarded to Benedict & Hall, of New York, at $1 ‎‎15 per pair.‎

          The entire contract for blankets was awarded to D. W. Parish, of Philadelphia. All to be ‎delivered within twenty-five days, under a penalty of $3,000 on each contract.‎

          Light-colored taper crown felt wool hat--to be looped under each side, at $1 25 each--for ‎five regiments, was awarded to Dodd & Co., of Cincinnati.‎

          ‎[NOTE: The above hats were furnished to the 6th-10th IVI's; the 11th IVI wore gray ‎‎"kepi-style" caps with red crowns).‎


          The hat adopted for the five regiments and contracted for yesterday [Thursday, 2 May], will be ‎found to be a very comfortable covering for the head, and with its loop on the side will look neat. ‎It will be far better for the men than caps, and will afford protection from the sun without adding ‎much more weight than the cap.‎

          Indianapolis Daily Sentinel, ‎9 May 1861:‎

          Capt. Blake's company [C] of the 10th Regiment got their arms yesterday [Wednesday, 8 May]. ‎They are the rifle muskets with the Maynard primer [i.e., .69 M1816 Remington conversions]. The company in their march to the armory ‎was accompanied by the celebrated Pickard Lafayette Band, and marched soldierly and well. It ‎is one of the best companies in the regiment and are to carry the colors and no one could look at ‎them without feeling assured that the regimental flag would be safe in their hands. Fifty of the ‎men are over six feet high and they all look like they had fight in them--enough to satisfy Jeff ‎Davis that Indianians are the men to resent an insult to their State and to the flag of the Union.‎

          [same paper and date]

          ARMY CONTRACTS.‎

          OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER GENERAL
          INDIANAPOLIS, May 8, 1861.‎

          SEALED PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THIS office until Monday, May 20, at six ‎o'clock P. M., for supplying four regiments of Indiana volunteers with the following articles: ‎UNIFORMS--Consisting of jackets and pants of woolen goods--jackets to be wadded in the ‎breast, to be lined throughout with a dark colored jeans or blue denim, with inside pocket, and ‎trimmed with nine regulation buttons in front and two on each sleeve.‎
          PANTS to be lined throughout with medium sheeting or drilling. FLANNEL SHIRTS of a gray ‎mixture, with pocket, cuffs and collar. Brown Drill Drawers, Woolen Socks, high cut Brogans, ‎with pegs cut out, and each shoe strung with leather strings. Felt Wool Hat, Camping Blankets.‎
          Goods to be delivered, free of expense, at this office, on or before the 10th day of June next, ‎under penalty of a forfeiture of thirty per cent, of the amount of each contract, to be paid for, in ‎cash, by the State of Indiana, on delivery and acceptance by the Quartermaster General.‎
          Each article of clothing to have sewed on it a ticket, on which shall be marked the size of the ‎garment.‎
          All bids must be accompanied by samples, on each of which should be a ticket with the ‎bidder's name and price marked on it.‎
          Parties making bids must state the security they can give for the performance of the ‎contract., if one be awarded to him.‎
          No bid will be considered for less than one regiment of 740 men.‎
          J. H. VAJEN.‎
          Quartermaster General

          Indianapolis Daily Sentinel, 10 May 1861:

          ‎10 May 1861:‎


          ARMY CONTRACTS.‎

          QUARTER-MASTER GEN. DEPAR'T.,‎
          INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 9, 1861.‎

          PROPOSALS WILL BE RECEIVED AT THIS DEPARTMENT until Friday evening next [May ‎‎17th, 1861.], for furnishing--‎

          ‎4,600 leather strap knapsacks.‎
          ‎4,600 canteens.‎
          ‎4,600 canvas or duck haversacks.‎

          All bids must be accompanied by samples. Goods to be delivered within fifteen days from the ‎time of signing the contract. Goods to be paid for in cash on delivery and inspection.‎

          J. H. VAJEN,‎
          may10tf Quartermaster General.‎

          Here are some additional notes from the unpublished diary of Private Valentine Thuma, 8th Indiana Volunteer Infantry (maintained at the Indiana Historical Society):

          2 May 61 - Thuma reports the 8th IVI received "U. S. muskets" rather than the hoped-for "minnie rifles."

          18 May 61 - Thuma indicates "the suit of uniform we are to have...is of dark gray color."

          19 May 61 - "The suit consists of pants and roundabout."

          24 May 61 - "We received our hats to day. They are gray, rough and ready with the left side buttoned up."

          There's plenty more, but this will keep you occupied for a while! :wink_smil

          I have long mulled over how to obtain similar uniforms for an event and, frankly, the jackets, trousers, and hats seem to be very similar to "commutation style" uniforms offered by various vendors. Some folks could almost wear their "Rebel" stuff and get away with it. Furthermore, the Dirty Billy "Confederate Hardee" hat is a reasonably close match to what Wm. Dodd & Co. provided to the State of Indiana.

          The real problem lies in rifles. Almost nobody would have access to "Remington conversion" M1816's or even M1842's. Therefore, unless organizers were willing to bend the rules, the most obvious unit selections would be either the 19th Ohio, which was partially armed with Enfields (although I don't know if these were 2 or 3-banders) or the 13th IVI, which had two companies armed with them just before it departed for Western Virginia in early July 1861.

          Before I forget, you might also be interested in this item taken from the 10 May 1861 Columbus OH "Weekly Gazette" (p. ‎‎3, col. 3) describing A. M. Denig's knapsack- making operation for the State of Ohio. It's clear ‎he extensively used prison labor:‎

          KNAPSACKS.--Strolling through the workshops in the [Ohio State] Penitentiary the other day, we tarried ‎awhile with A. M. Denig & Co., to witness the process of manufacturing knapsacks, this firm having ‎recently taken a contract for supplying the government with two thousand of these indispensable articles ‎‎[making "500 a week, at the rate of two dollars for each...."] for the convenience of the soldier. About forty ‎hands were employed in cutting, stitching, strapping, buckling, boxing, covering and lettering, and so ‎rapidly was the work executed that no difficulty was found in providing daily for a Company of a hundred ‎men. The material of which these knapsacks are made of is called enamelled duck having a bright ‎morocco finish, warranted water proof. ‎
          The pattern was selected with great, good judgement, from the most tasty of those worn by the New York ‎troops. There are three sets of straps to each; breast straps, shoulder straps and blanket straps, so ‎fastened as to make the knapsack self adjusting, thus preserving at all times, when worn, a graceful ‎appearance. The inside boxes are made by machinery, strong but light, the knapsack complete weighing ‎less than three pounds.‎
          ‎ The firm of A. M. Denig & Co., has long been extensively engaged in the manufacture of children's ‎cabs, buggies, light wagons, hobby horses and the like, and the nature of such a business of course, ‎gives them peculiar advantages over all others in the manufacture of knapsacks.‎
          ‎ We trust the officers of State awarding contracts, will make it a point to encourage home enterprise, ‎and that they will endeavor to avoid the too common practice of passing by our own mechanics to swell ‎the pockets of the millionaires of the East, even though they may not save a few dollars by the operation. ‎Let the taxes raised in Ohio, be expended in Ohio, to the advantage of the people of Ohio.‎

          ‎[END QUOTE]‎

          ‎"A. M. Denig & Co." definitely provided several thousand knapsacks to the states of Ohio and Indiana in ‎the first year of the war--the 1863 Indiana QMG Report as well as 1861 Indiana newspaper notices ‎specifically mention this firm.‎

          Regards,

          Mark Jaeger
          Last edited by markj; 07-19-2004, 04:20 PM.
          Regards,

          Mark Jaeger

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

            Comrades:

            We are assembling a group to visit with the Rich Mountain Battlefield Foundation September 10th-12th. So far, we are considering either an Indiana or Ohio unit on the Federal side and a Virginia unit on the Confederate side. Todd Morris is already working on info for the Federals and Mark Jaeger has been providing some excellent information as well.

            Now, we are looking for someone who can help on the Confederate side. If you have an excellent working knowledge of Virginia units - including uniforms and campaigns and would be interested in helping to establish the Confederate impression, please shoot me an e-mail at etinohio@msn.com. We would need you to attend the meeting with us in September.

            Thanks.
            Eric Tipton
            AC Owner
            Founding Member, Mess No. 1
            Cincinnati, Ohio

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

              Greetings,

              Some of you will enjoy the attached letter (in Adobe pdf). However, "caveat lector" since some of the writer's "facts" are contradicted by other accounts. I will transcribe another letter dealing with the actions of the 13th IVI and will post it in due course.

              Regards,

              Mark Jaeger
              Last edited by markj; 06-04-2007, 03:10 PM.
              Regards,

              Mark Jaeger

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                Very interesting discussion.

                There very well may be a way to keep all happy as far as National forces go.

                Ohio, in late April 1861, called up ten additional regiments of infantry for "State" service. These regiments were organized for the most part at Camp Jackson/Chase in Columbus. The regiments were somewhat different in one sense than the initial Ohio regiments (per the call of 75,000) eleven of which, were organized at Camp Dennison as they were under State authority. They should not be confused with the three-year regiments organized later in 1861, almost all of which went into Kentucky. For example, the Twentieth OVM that organized in Columbus, which served in Western Virginia, was a separate organization than the Twentieth OVI, organized for three-years, regardless of what was recorded later in the Official Rosters. BTW, when trying to figure all this out, it doesn't help that they all referred to themselves all as "OVM."

                Uniforms and equipment's for the three-year regiments at Dennison were paid for by Ohio, but purchases were made under direction of McClellan's (Federal) Quartermaster Capt. John H. Dickerson, beginning in early May 1861.

                The fellow who procured clothing for the State regiments in Columbus was named A. D. Bullock and was a member of the Ohio Military Board. We are fortunate to have testimony from Bullock regarding these purchases from the Van Wycke Committee investigation of army contracts in late 1861 and contained in the Serial Set.

                Both procurement officers initially advertised and purchased clothing per the United States Regulations, including blouses. Bullock however noted in his testimony that the market for army goods was so advanced, that he was forced to purchase non-regulation goods in order to provide enough uniforms to the State troops organizing in Columbus.

                These non-regulation goods were gray cloth jackets/suits. One image of an unknown soldier of the Fifteenth OVM can be found on the "Ohio in the War" site under "15th OVI" and resides in the Strayer collection, several Id'd images are known, including the 19th Ohio. We have been aware of these jackets for some time, being listed in both Todd's, as well as an article by Kochan in M. C. & H. The Ohio Executive Documents (same document the list of arms comes from) has a list of all clothing purchased by Ohio in 1861, and includes 5700 gray cloth jackets. Just for the sake of clarity, only 1,100 jackets "other type" besides MSJ's are noted, lest we confuse these with the "Ohio" jacket as it is understood/perceived in reenacting.

                A June 1861 article in one of the Cincinnati papers has a list of clothing furnished both regiments at Camp Jackson/Chase, and to the three-year regiments at Camp Dennison.

                On the list, these gray jackets are noted as being of the "Indiana" pattern. The clothing purchased from several of the very same contractors supplying Indiana as Mark noted, including Glaser & Bros of Cincinnati.

                The AG records at OHS contains a list of what early Ohio regiments received, and who made it, therefore, we can match up contractors with regiments. There is a chance* that we might* find that the Nineteenth Ohio received clothing from the same house as for example, the Eighth Indiana, maybe of the same pattern.

                As for the Sixth Ohio. In Ebb Hannafords "Story of a Regiment" he mentions that at the outset of the history of the regiment, uniforms of gray cloth of the same pattern as that of the Guthrie Grays fatigue jackets were purchased with private contributions and given to several companies at their initial camp of instruction, Camp Harrison, near Cincinnati.

                There is more to the story. What happened was that the members of the Guthrie Grays, when they were knocking about the idea of expanding to a full strength regiment, voted to represent the City of Cincinnati as the Seventh New York did the City of New York. The officers of the organization placed private contracts for a thousand plus uniforms of gray material, of which we have a very good description, and maybe, one surviving example in a private collection.

                Unfortunately the public didn't respond as was expected, and the Regiment was only able to raise enough cash to purchase four hundred, leaving the balance in limbo. The officers went to the Cincinnati City Council and were rejected, and complained a lot about it in the city papers. So much so, including a threat by the several companies who didn't receive the uniforms to leave camp, that at least one of the papers started to refer to the Guthries as "spoiled" and as "pets."

                Eventually the State bailed these officers out by purchasing the balance, and the Sixth received them.

                One thing to keep in mind is that at Dennison, Dickerson was allowing regiments to draw clothing per the Regulations. Most of the regiments once reorganized for three years, received both uniforms (uniform coat, blue satinet trousers) and fatigue uniforms (blouse, gray satinet trousers, some with black stripes). Private soldiers, once they mustered in, were allowed to draw clothing from their allowance as opposed to it being "issued" to them. This amounts to "credit" and as today, some of these boys were more responsible than others.

                We have the clothing account book of the First Kentucky for this period. When the First left the Cincinnati public landing in July 1861, for the mouth of the Kanawha, it seems none embarked with quite the same amount of clothing. Some soldiers purchased three shirts, some two pairs of shoes, some overcoats, some left with three pairs of trousers, some decided to not draw anything extra.

                Meigs complained about this of volunteers later in the year in his official report to the War Department and the House, and it probably has at least something to do with limitations of what soldiers were to take when on campaign, and noted in the General Orders of several departments found in the OR's.

                Members of the Sixth were no different from others in the Army, and it is probable that some of their members left with knapsacks literally packed with clothing. Later on in the Regimental, Hannaford mentions that members tossed clothing, and specifically mentions the hard fought for gray jackets, when they arrived in Western Virginia at the first sound of the guns, during a pushed advance to meet them.

                We don't know what exactly the Sixth was wearing at Rich Mountain, but they left Ohio with blouses/trousers, uniform coats/trousers, and gray "Guthrie Gray" satinet jackets/trousers, besides anything individually drawn . These volunteers were not Regulars by God!

                At least one regiment, the Ninth, voted to leave without drawing uniform clothing, preferring to crush the Rebellion in their fatigue clothing. Thereby saving the balance for a later period of the campaign. Their officers were all German veterans, and obviously knew what they were about.

                It should also be noted too that the Sixth complained bitterly in the fall for want of clothing. Some may have simply used up their allowance earlier.

                Anyway, gray jackets. Would be something to see Federals in gray jackets/suits!

                Rich Mountain was pivotal in the first campaign of the Civil War on the sacred soil of old Virginia, Bull Run be Danged. Would be fitting to do this right.

                Will outline all of this with sources when I'm feeling a bit better, having just returned from surgery. Neat idea Eric, keep it up.

                Regards,

                John

                John Sarver
                Cincinnati
                John Sarver

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                  John,

                  Excellent post in reference to the uniforms of the (OVM= Old Volunteer Mules).

                  The information will be valuable in the formation of the Federal Portrayal for this event.

                  I am plannign a trip to Columbus to go through what AG records that I can in reference to a 19th OVI portrayal. Me and Mark can then compare notes.

                  The hinge pin for all of this will be the meeting that Eric is setting up with the board at Rich Mountain. After the meeting and tour (especially the tour) there should be a good idea on which direction the impression is going to go. The talk with W. Hunter Lesser should be of emmense help in the formation of this plan.
                  Todd Morris

                  Proprietor, Morris & Company Historical Clothiers

                  http://morrisclothiers.com

                  Canton Lodge #60 F&AM Canton, Ohio


                  In Memorium: Pvt. Simon Morris, Co. G, 78th OVI Died: April 14, 1863 Jefferson Barracks, Missouri
                  Joseph Rezin Thompson, 1st W.Va. Light Artillery
                  Azville W. Lindsey, Co. G, 12th W.Va. Volunteer Infantry

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                    You'll like this (see Adobe pdf attachment). I whipped it together during some free time this afternoon.

                    Regards,

                    Mark Jaeger
                    Last edited by markj; 06-04-2007, 03:10 PM.
                    Regards,

                    Mark Jaeger

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                      Originally posted by Eric
                      Comrades:

                      I'm adding this to the potential calendar for 2006 in the spirit of deconfliction. I haven't seen anything else scheduled for July 2006, so here goes:

                      Discussion is very preliminary, but I should know more in the next week or so from the Rich Mountain Battlefield Foundation. The initial proposal is currently in their hands for discussion and we plan to meet in August to discuss potential logistics. They have a mainstream reenactment in odd-years, so the site is open as far as that goes.

                      Event Name: Rich Mountain 145th Anniversary
                      Location: Beverly, West Virginia
                      Date: July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)
                      Host: Sixth Ohio - Mess #1. Seeking a co-host on the Confederate side if concept is approved.
                      Sponsor: Rich Mountain Battlefield Foundation and potentially the CWPT (Proposed)
                      Discussion Format: To Be Determined.
                      Contact: Federal: Eric Tipton, etinohio@msn.com
                      Contact: Confederate: To Be Determined.
                      Citizen: To Be Determined.
                      Website: Would most likely be an off-shoot of the <!--EZCODE LINK START-->
                      Rich Mountain Web Site<!--EZCODE LINK END-->.
                      Comments: General plan is for movement in the vicinity of Laurel Hill, the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike in and around the Rich Mountain Battlefield to follow in the steps of the original battle in July of 1861. If concept is approved, the scenario to be worked through with the Battlefield Foundation historians. A tour of the site is tentatively scheduled for August.
                      Event Point of Contact: Same as Federal POC, above
                      Event Type: Campaign, semi-immersion event
                      Impression(s): Federal - Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Confederate - To Be Determined. Early war impressions, obviously. Uniform standards would be in line with other EBUFU events.
                      Preservation: To Be Determined. Preliminary discussions have begun with the Rich Mountain Battlefield Foundation and the plan would be to donate all net proceeds to the preservation of the battlefield.
                      Registration: To Be Determined.

                      That's all for now. We have a very long way to go, but it's a start. If we can get past the concept stage, I'm going to need some help. John Cleaveland has agreed to "consult" a bit and I'll be calling him if we can get this meeting set up.

                      Does anyone have an idea about a good Confederate unit that could be portrayed? I'm just starting my homework on that part.
                      Did this event happen already ?!?
                      Ken Cornett
                      MESS NO.1
                      Founding Member
                      OHIO
                      Mason Lodge #678, PM
                      Need Rules?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                        I am not sure. But if it did they better not make me drop my knapsack. I could not pass a night without my blankie.....
                        [FONT=Times New Roman][b]Tripp Corbin[/b][/FONT]
                        [URL=http://www.westernindependentgrays.org/]Western Independent Grays[/URL]
                        [URL=http://www.armoryguards.org/]Armory Guards[/url]

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                          Mr. Messiah, when you registered for forum membership, you agreed to sign your real first and last name to every post and reply. Please remember to do so in the future.

                          Regards, Elizabeth Clark, Forum Moderating Team Member.
                          Last edited by ElizabethClark; 09-07-2006, 10:05 PM.
                          Warren Hook
                          First Sibley Mess
                          New Madrid Guards
                          WIG



                          "...And to Missouri we
                          Extend both heart and hand
                          And welcome her a sister
                          Of our Confederate band
                          Tho surrounded by oppression
                          No one dare deter
                          Her adding to our Bonnie Blue Flag
                          Her bright and twelfth star! "

                          Lyrics, Bonnie Blue Flag, by Harry McCarthy, 1861.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                            For those of you still basking in the warm glow of the successful Rich Mountain event, y'all might be interested in this image I just discovered on eBay showing a true "Face of Rich Mountain":

                            http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...ME:B:WNA:US:12

                            Regards,

                            Mark Jaeger
                            Regards,

                            Mark Jaeger

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                              For what it's worth, a Rich Mountain 2006 event report will be in the March/April 2007 issue of Civil War Historian magazine.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Rich Mountain - July 14-16, 2006 (Proposed)

                                This report would've been out long ago, if someone hadn't dropped the ball. Sorry Eric...


                                Mike Phineas
                                Arlington, TX
                                Mike Phineas
                                Arlington, TX
                                24th Missouri Infantry
                                Independent Volunteer Battalion
                                www.24thmissouri.org

                                "Oh, go in anywhere Colonel, go in anywhere. You'll find lovely fighting all along the line."

                                -Philip Kearny

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X