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Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

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  • Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    Semi immersive event 1 hour south of Chicago

    The scenario will be a portin of the the skirmishing and aftermath of the Battle of Brices Crossroads
    US Impression -113th Illinois
    CS Impression- 7th Kentucky Mounted Infantry
    Civilian Impression -citzens of Guntown

    Registration will be up soon

    POC-Rod Miller Rmhisteach@aol.com
    Rod Miller
    [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
    [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


    [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
    A. Lincoln[/FONT]

    150th Anniversary
    1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
    1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
    1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
    1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
    Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
    1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
    Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

  • #2
    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

    I attended the initial event last year and it was very nice. The grounds are a good place to do this type of event and I thoroughly enjoyed it.
    Michael Comer
    one of the moderator guys

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

      I'm looking forward to this event Rod. See you there!
      Your humble servant....
      Sean Collicott
      [URL="www.sallyportmess.itgo.com"]Sally Port Mess[/URL]
      [URL="http://oldnorthwestvols.org/onv/index.php"]Old Northwest Volunteers[/URL]

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

        This event had some of the best impressions in the midwest maybe the nation . The best event in the midwest ! Please contact me if you have questions or if you want to raise a company .
        Rod
        Rod Miller
        [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
        [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
        [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


        [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
        A. Lincoln[/FONT]

        150th Anniversary
        1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
        1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
        1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
        1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
        Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
        1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
        Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

          CS Officer- Mike Comer
          US Officer-Jeremy Brevard
          Civilian Coordinator Nanci Gaisel
          Event Coordinator-Rod Miller
          Rod Miller
          [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
          [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
          [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


          [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
          A. Lincoln[/FONT]

          150th Anniversary
          1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
          1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
          1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
          1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
          Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
          1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
          Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

            The website and registration will be up in March . We have folks planning on attending from ILL, Mo., Oh. ,Wi.,Mi ,Ia and In. It is already shaping up!
            Rod Miller
            [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
            [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
            [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


            [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
            A. Lincoln[/FONT]

            150th Anniversary
            1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
            1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
            1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
            1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
            Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
            1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
            Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

              Registration is open ! https://sites.google.com/site/routedatguntown/
              Rod Miller
              [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
              [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
              [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


              [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
              A. Lincoln[/FONT]

              150th Anniversary
              1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
              1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
              1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
              1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
              Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
              1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
              Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                Registrations are coming in .
                30-federal spots
                45-CS spots
                25- Civilian spots
                Rod Miller
                [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
                [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
                [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


                [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
                A. Lincoln[/FONT]

                150th Anniversary
                1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
                1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
                1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
                1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
                Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
                1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
                Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                  Rod,

                  Can you send me an email to chris@southunionmills.com so I will have your email address? I've tried sending PMs but your inbox is full. I wanted to get with you about some USCC things.

                  Thanks!

                  Chris
                  Chris Utley
                  South Union Mills
                  www.southunionmills.com
                  www.facebook.com/southunionmills

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                    I have heard nothing but great things about the last events Rod has done at this site. I am looking foward to being part fo this one. It will also be the next event I can get to this year.
                    Respectfully,

                    Jeremy Bevard
                    Moderator
                    Civil War Digital Digest
                    Sally Port Mess

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                      Registration fee goes for Rations . This event is what they used to call a n empty haversack event:-)
                      Rod Miller
                      [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


                      [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
                      A. Lincoln[/FONT]

                      150th Anniversary
                      1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
                      1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
                      1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
                      1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
                      Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
                      1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
                      Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                        As I prepare some other folks for an event on the historical ground at Brice's Crossroads in a few days, I though y'all might enjoy this. Today, the quiet field and forests of GunTown, Mississippi provide a good bit of period dyestuffs for my iron kettles and copper pots.

                        From the larger diary of Samuel Agnew, as transcribed in the collection of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Documenting the American South Collection
                        http://docsouth.unc.edu/imls/agnew/agnew.html


                        June 9, 1864

                        Forrest gone towards Rienzi

                        Many days have intervened since I wrote in this journal, but now (June 14) I will proceed to the task. On the 9th during the forenoon I assisted Uncle Jo in making some rope on our rope works. The news we had was that Rucker had gone with his Brigade towards Rienzi. General Forrest with his entire command has gone towards Rienzi. The Yankees were reported to have gone in the same direction. We hence felt very easy, thinking that for the present we would not be troubled with Yankees. Late this evening Thompson Phillips came over, telling us that Oliver Nelson had sent word down that the Yankees were coming down the Ripley road this evening, and it was not known whether they would go towards Baldwyn or Guntown. Sent the mules off to the wood lot. Went over and told Uncle Joseph of the facts, Brought the mules in at dark. We were discredit[ing] the Yankee news. The day was pleasant.

                        June 10, 1864

                        Yankees coming--

                        The morning was cloudy. At breakfast learn that the Yankees

                        Page 301
                        camped at Stubbs' last night. Although we did not suppose they would travel this road I went out early with the mules into the woods back of the Watson field. Went over to Uncle Jo's to notify him of the report. Got lost on the way. While at Uncle Jo's hear a roaring towards Lyons Gin which I did not understand. Came on back. Stopped at the far end of the lane to take observation. While there hear two horsemen approaching down through the thickets back of the farm. Await untill I could hear them conversing, then put my horse to the run and escaped to the thickets. I have reason now to think that the approaching horsemen were Yankees. Got back to camp. Loll about and read Harris Highlands of Ethiopia. About 10 o'clock heard the report of cannon towards Baldwyn. Suppose that the enemy had gone down the Baldwyn road and had met Forrest there. Walked over to the western fence of the Watson field to note directions of the cannonading. Concluded it was about the Cross Roads. The cannonading continued with brief intermission for several hours. While at the Watson field saw Arch skulking through the woods. He told me that the Yankees were at our house and had taken everything we had to eat. About 50 waggons were in the front of our road, and the yard was full of thousands of negroes. This was bad news but I hoped that Arch being badly frightened had exagerated. His news caused us to keep quiet, and not attempt to communicate with the house. Listen intently and anxiously to the firing.

                        The battle--danger from shells

                        The battle raged long and doubtfully for some time in the

                        Page 302
                        direction of the Cross Roads. About 5 o'clock the firing evidently drew nearer, and I was satisfied it was near Holland's. About 6 o'clock to my surprise shells began to fall in the woods where I was hid. At the time I first noticed them, I was near the Watson field, taking observations. Shells coming over rapidly with a whizzing noise we deemed it prudent to get out of the way. Just as we were leaving the back of the field I heard some persons talking near us. I supposed it was Pa conducting Mother & Nannie and came very near going to their assistance, but just then a shell came whizzing with a peculiarly unpleasant noise over my head and I betook myself to the mules. The negroes there told me that a shell had fallen near them, cutting off a limb from a tree. As speedily as we could we moved down. Saw Uncle Jo in the woods. He told me the Yankees were in our wheat field in thousands. It was them that I heard just before I left the Watson field. He could give no intelligence from home. I was greatly uneasy. The battle evidently was then raging there.

                        Battle at the Cross Roads

                        I rode with the mules down near Uncle Young's and stopped N of his home farm. Walked over and got supper, Erskine with me. They could give me no news from home. The battle was fought principally around the Cross Roads. 12 Yankees had come on a scout to Uncle Young's. They fired on him as he was leaving home. His fine clothing and hat was captured. He was taking them to a place

                        Page 303
                        of safety, but in the race lost them. The battle at the Cross Roads was very severe. The ground all around the Cross Roads is covered with the wounded and the dead. Gen. Lee had a son killed. The enemy fought desperately, making a stubborn fight, but finally were driven back and at last accounts the fighting was going on about our house. Forrest was in the front, pursuing with vigor.

                        June 11, 1864

                        Appearances about home

                        Was in the woods all night. It was showery. By light was up, and walked over to Uncle Young's. Got no additional information. I was very anxious in reference to the family and came on up home cautiously. Find that the Yankees have been driven away. Our once pleasant home was a wreck. My very heart pained me when I beheld the desolation wrought. Thanks to a merciful God the lives of the family were preserved although they were exposed to great danger. The garden and yard fences were torn down. Our yard was full of horses. Soldiers were stalking through the yard and house, without any ceremony. Yankee waggons line in the road. Before I reached the house I found the road filled with shoes, and articles of almost every description which had been thrown away by the Yankees in the retreat. Dead negroes lay stretched cold in death on the road side. I saw 2 before I came to the gate. The road was filled with soldiers passing to and fro. When I saw these things I knew that Forrest had gained a great and complete victory, but my heart sank within

                        Page 304
                        me at the prospect of our own losses & found Mother, Nannie, Mary and Margaret in the back piazza. They were laughing and talking but under their mirth I could see a sadness conceiled.

                        House plundered--no food left

                        They told me that the Yankees had taken away every ear of corn, and every pound of meat, leaving us nothing to eat. That they had not eaten a bite since the previous morning. That the house had been plundered. I walked through the rooms and find everything turned upside down and nearly everything we had taken from us. Dead and wounded men were lying in the house. The walls of the house had been perforated by a good many canister and grape balls. One shrapnell struck the guttering on the south side of the dining room. Negroes and white men both plundered the house and nothing could move their hearts to pity, but with vandal hands they rifled trunks, bureaus and rooms. They entered every room but the catch-all. Destruction seemed to be their aim. I have heard of many things they took away, but cannot recapitulate. Even the negroes were robbed of their clothing &c. The expedition was commanded by Gen. Sturgis, a resident of Chicago, Ill. Grierson commanded the cavalry.

                        Negroe troops--insolence

                        The negroes were especially insolent. As they passed the road they shook their fists at the ladies and told them they were going to show Forrest that they were his rulers. As they returned their tune was changed. With tears in their eyes they came to my Mother

                        Page 305
                        and asked her what they must do. Would Mr. Forrest kill them. Poor fools, many a simpleton lies rotting along the road this day. I felt sorry when I saw the first one, but when I heard how they did I lost all my sympathy for the black villians. The Yankees as they went along estimated their force at 50,000. As they went back they said they had 12000 while Forrest had 30,000. They acknowledged on the retreat that they had got the worst whipping they ever had had. On the retreat Sturgis was in the front going at a trot. 2 Yankees surrendered to Mother before the battle here.

                        Our yard a battle-ground

                        While the fighting was going on at the Cross Roads Yankees were on the place all the time. When it was evident that there would be a fight here a Yankee told Mother that she had better leave the house as the Rebs were agoing to shell it. They told the negroes that if the whites left the house they would burn it. When the fight commenced Mother and the rest of them closed the doors and window-blinds and lay flat on the floor in Margaret's room, and remained safely untill our men drove them away. The Yard was a battle ground, the Southerners on the South side and the Yankees next the crib. The Yankees made a breast work of the fence between the Yard and Crib lot. The Yankee battery was in front of our gate. Rice's artillery was just below the garden. The fight here was nearly as stubborn as at the Cross Roads. Capt. Rice told me that the artillery saved the day here. When he came up the cavalry were retreating. The cavalry say this is the only

                        Page 306
                        time the artillery ever did them any good. In front of the house the marks of the bullets are plainly to be seen. These and many other things I heard.

                        Uneasiness about Pa

                        Crowds thronged the whole country. Many came from distant neighborhoods to view the battleground. Rode down to Uncle Young's. My heart was so full at our situation that I could hardly talk. Came back and Pa was still absent. Mother & May were crying about him and I must acknowledge I myself was uneasy about him. Rode over to Uncle Jo, and with him scour the branch bottom this side of his house, but with no success. Then came on home via Lyons' Gin House. Saw many waggons filled with ammunition, crackers and many other things. The dog Lincoln was out with Pa. He came in this evening. Some fear that he has been found by the Yankees and killed, others that he has been captured and taken off. While others think that he has become faint in the woods, and perhaps has lain down, unable to go. He was seen yesterday evening, back of the Davis patch by J. N. Haddon. He, Uncle Jo, Martin Beaty, Hickey Holmes and myself commenced searching in that direction and found him in the thickets after a brief search. He has seen the trains of waggons on the roadside, and supposing they were still held by the Yankees he kept the bushes. His discovery lifted up a load of anxiety from my breast. The neighbors are very kind, Uncle Jo especially so. Forrest today is after the Yankees, we have various reports from him.

                        Page 307

                        June 12, 1864

                        Burying the dead--rain

                        Sabbath. A very rainy day, and such crowds have been passing: so many guns have been firing and so many persons have been about the house that it has not seemed like a sabbath. Pa, Uncle Jo & Martin took the negroes and buried the Yankee's negroes whoose bodies lie near. It rained so much that operations were suspended untill the afternoon. Some Yankee prisoners--4 in number--were brought out this evening, to assist in burying the dead. They were from Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Illinois. They are down upon their officers, say that in a fight they are always in the rear, and on a retreat at the front. Three white men are buried near us, viz Rice of the 7th Tenn. King of Rice's Battery, and A. J. Smith. The Yankees are buried shallow, the negroes especially so.

                        Wounded and sick with us

                        I sat about the house the entire day, doing nothing of great moment. Pa had the negroes repairing his fencing. Some Kentuckians are camped under the crib. Some just from Paducah report the draft progressing in Ky. A good many of the drafted men are joining our army. Of 4500 drafted in Cincinnatti only 50 have reported. We have with us a Mr. Carr of Yallabusha Co. who is seriously wounded in the abdomen. Dr. Jackson is waiting on him. The Dr. seems to be an intelligent, steady physician and kind man. A Mr. Alex Bobo and Jessie Andrew of Panola. Co. belonging to Chalmers' 18th Reg't

                        Page 308
                        are also here. They furnish their own rations. These all seem to be nice. Three other wounded men were here but they were removed to the Hospital on saturday. The people are riding over the battle field from some distance. Although the day has been rainy I notice many ladies riding over the road.

                        June 13, 1864

                        The stench--return of Forrest

                        The road has been still the scene of continued travelling by the soldiers. The waggons which were captured are being taken down the road. Forrest has made a rich capture.

                        This morning walk over the ground near us. Find many dead horses and mules and the stench is great. Gen. Forrest passed back today. I noticed nothing special in his appearance. Understand he is in a bad humor--having been informed that the citizens have been "stealing" many of the articles from the Yankee waggons. Gen. Buford also passed. He is a large chuffy man. Gen. Lyon also went down. A good many troops passed down today. The pursuit of the enemy has been discontinued. They were followed to Salem. Some troops followed farther. At Ripley an Saturday there was a sharp fight. Pa rode over to Hollands to concert some measures in reference to obtaining some supplies from Forrest. His provisions were taken from him and were all captured by Forrest, and he thinks that perhaps he can have it restored to him. Officers tell him that they think an application will be successful. Holland and Brice will act with him. And will go down and see the General as

                        Page 309
                        soon as matters get quiet. 800 Yankee prisoners passed down today, under guard. It is impossible to find one who will acknowledge that he ever plundered. One remarked as he came up here's the man that caught your Turkeys. Another was heard to say here's the place where we got the wine. Some officers were among them. Nice looking men they were. A few negroes brought up the rear. The most of the negroes were shot, our men being so much incensed that they shoot them wherever they see them. It is certain that a great many negroes have been killed. The prisoners pointed out their positions here. One was in the yard, one in the road, another in the woods & one pointed out a tree and said I shot at a big fat rebel from behind that tree. A good many regiments were along, I do not know all, the 9th Minnesota, 2 Iowa Cav'l'y, 81st, 104 Illinois, &c. The day was showery.

                        Wrote to Mrs. McKell today in haste to give her an account of the recent battle and assure her of our safety.

                        June 14, 1864

                        At the Cross Roads--sad scenes

                        Affairs are becoming quieter, but there are many still passing. Commence bringing up this journal. This evening rode over to Hollands' to see him about the proposed application to Forrest for provisions. Find the roads badly cut up by the waggons and artillery that are passing every hour. The lane of Wm. Phillips has become impassible, and the waggons go in by Mrs. Phillips house now. See

                        Page 310
                        several graves on the road-side. The negroes are covered with very little dirt. The stench from dead horses is almost insupportable. It is sickening to pass along the roads. With Holland rode on over to Brice's. See the marks of the battle: but not so apparent as I had supposed. His house and yard are public property now. Sick men occupy the rooms. Some poor fellows are mortally wounded. I felt sorry when I looked on the poor fellows, dieing so far from the dear ones at home. They are lying on pallets. Some Yankees are also there. The Church seems to be occupied by sick prisoners. The principle surgeon was operating on a Yankee while I was there. He was lieing on a table insensible being under the influence of Chloroform. His right foot had been amputated and his left hand 1/2 taken out. As I came home saw a gentleman just from Johnson army. On the 8th he was still about New Hope Church in quietness. See a Prairie News of this morning. It called the battle of friday the battle near Baldwyn. In Virginia Grant and Lee very near each other. The battles of the 4 & 5th of May were not decisive. In some places the lines of the armies are only 50 yds. apart. The decisive battle is yet to be fought. In Georgia the armies present about the old appearance. And the decisive battle is yet to be fought there also. The N. Y. Herald of the 8th announces that on the 8th the Republican convention nominated Abraham Lincoln for the Presidency and Andrew Johnson of Tennessee for the Vice Presidency. They are a delicious duo. Mr. Boyd, the gentleman just from Johnston's army lives near Portersville Tenn. A Mr. Sergant of this county is here tonight. He is

                        Page 311
                        just from Richmond on the 4th June. Luther Richey and William Agnew were well at that time. He says Lee cannot be whipped.
                        Terre Hood Biederman
                        Yassir, I used to be Mrs. Lawson. I still run period dyepots, knit stuff, and cause trouble.

                        sigpic
                        Wearing Grossly Out of Fashion Clothing Since 1958.

                        ADVENTURE CALLS. Can you hear it? Come ON.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                          thanks for the diary post ,Terre!
                          Rod Miller
                          [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
                          [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
                          [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


                          [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
                          A. Lincoln[/FONT]

                          150th Anniversary
                          1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
                          1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
                          1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
                          1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
                          Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
                          1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
                          Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                            Interested.. So you all are doing Brice's Crossroads that happened in Guntown MS? But the event is in Illinois. Would Mississippi not let y'all in?? Just kidding.
                            Thank You,

                            Brent Dacus

                            The AC Admin
                            The Company of Military Historians
                            Member, Civil War Preservation Trust

                            Are you reading? I still am...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Routed at Guntown. a semi immersion event in Bourbonnais, Illinois on september 5-7, 2014

                              Originally posted by bdacus View Post
                              Interested.. So you all are doing Brice's Crossroads that happened in Guntown MS? But the event is in Illinois. Would Mississippi not let y'all in?? Just kidding.
                              Brent
                              The folks involved in this effort have been part of LH events at most of the civil war battle fields in accross the US . We have done immersion an semi immersion events in the midwest for a few years now. Mostly an attempt to have a quality event in which we don't have to drive 8 hours or more to get on sight. Let me know if you have additional questions.
                              Rod Miller
                              [COLOR=SlateGray]Old Pards[/COLOR]
                              [COLOR=DarkRed]Cornfed Comrades[/COLOR]
                              [COLOR=Navy]Old Northwest Volunteers[/COLOR]


                              [FONT=Palatino Linotype]"We trust, Sir, that God is on our side." "It is more important to know that we are on God's side."
                              A. Lincoln[/FONT]

                              150th Anniversary
                              1861 Camp Jackson-Sgt. German Milita US
                              1st Manassas- Chaplain T. Witherspoon, 2nd Miss. Inf. CS
                              1862 Shiloh -Lt. ,6th Miss. Inf. CS
                              1863 VicksburgLH-Captain Cephas Williams, 113th Co.B US
                              Gettysburg BGA- Chaplain WilliamWay, 24th MI US
                              1864 Charleston Riot-Judge Charles Constable "Copperhead".
                              Bermuda Hundred Campaign-USCC Field Agent J.R. Miller

                              Comment

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